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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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February 24 2015

Mummy Hair Reveals Ancient South American Diet


The hair of 2,000-year-old mummies, long locks adorned with embroidered textiles, is helping researchers determine what these ancient people ate in the weeks and months before their deaths, a new study finds.

A chemical analysis of the mummies' hair suggests these ancient individuals, who once lived on the southern coast of modern-day Peru, likely ate corn, beans, and marine plants and animals, the researchers found.


Related: Healers Once Prescribed Chocolate Like Aspirin

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February 24 2015

Marijuana may be even safer than previously thought, researchers say


Compared with other recreational drugs — including alcohol — marijuana may be even safer than previously thought. And researchers may be systematically underestimating risks associated with alcohol use.

Those are the top-line findings of recent research published in the journal Scientific Reports, a subsidiary of Nature. Researchers sought to quantify the risk of death associated with the use of a variety of commonly used substances. They found that at the level of individual use, alcohol was the deadliest substance, followed by heroin and cocaine.


Alt: No, smoking pot will likely NOT make you psychotic

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February 24 2015

Feeding Babies Foods With Peanuts Appears To Prevent Allergies


Babies at high risk for becoming allergic to peanuts are much less likely to develop the allergy if they are regularly fed foods containing the legumes starting in their first year of life.

That's according to a big new study released Monday involving hundreds of British babies. The researchers found that those who consumed the equivalent of about 4 heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting when they were between 4 and 11 months old, were about 80 percent less likely to develop a peanut allergy by their fifth birthday.

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February 24 2015

How hand-washing dishes may prevent kids from getting allergies


Moms and dads -- grab a sponge and step away from the dishwasher.

A new study suggests that hand-washing dishes (and leaving some microbes on a fork, bowl, or plate in the process) may help reduce the risk of allergy development in young children.

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February 24 2015

Saunas May Help You Live Longer


Sweating it out on a regular basis in saunas is something that the Finns, Russians and many other people particularly of cold climate cultures have sworn by for centuries. And now science has proven there may in fact be some life-extending benefits to the temperature extremes of the sauna.

For the study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, followed a group of 2,315 middle-aged men (42 to 60 years old) from eastern Finland. They then checked in on the men after 21 years to learn how many had died and from what causes.

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February 24 2015

Fluoride in drinking water may trigger depression and weight gain, warn scientists


Fluoride could be causing depression and weight gain and councils should stop adding it to drinking water to prevent tooth decay, scientists have warned.

A study of 98 per cent of GP practices in England found that high rates of underactive thyroid were 30 per cent more likely in areas of the greatest fluoridation.


Alt: Water fluoridation in England linked to higher rates of underactive thyroid

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February 24 2015

Deepest Ocean Water Teems With Life


A few years ago, film director James Cameron spent hours scouring the world's deepest ocean canyon for any sign of life. He found a few bizarre animals, but it turns out the real action in the Mariana Trench happens beyond the reach of a submersible's camera.

Researchers from Japan discovered microscopic bacteria thrive in the canyon called Challenger Deep, which is the lowest point on Earth's surface and the deepest part of the Mariana Trench, the team reports today (Feb. 23) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In particular, they found an unusual community of bacteria there called heterotrophs, or microbes that cannot produce their own food and must eat what they find in the water.

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February 24 2015

After Thousands of Years, Earth's Frozen Life Forms Are Waking Up


What's happening in Siberia's thawing permafrost and Greenland's melting glaciers sounds borderline supernatural. Ancient viruses, bacteria, plants, and even animals have been cryogenically frozen there for millennia—and now, they are waking up.

Cryofreezing is best known for its appearances in science fiction, but self-styled "resurrection ecologists" are now showing the world just how real it is.

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February 24 2015

Spots, Stripes and Spreading Hooves in the Horses of the Ice Age


During the upper Palaeolithic (that is, between 40,000 and 10,000 years ago), prehistoric people in Europe and Asia (and elsewhere) depicted the animals they saw in thousands of piece of cave art. They drew, sculpted and painted rhinos, mammoths, giant deer and lions, but they also produced illustrations of less exotic beasts, like owls, mustelids and rabbits. Comparisons made with living animals and fossils reveal that these depictions are, on the whole, biologically accurate and often result from informed observation. The greatest concentration of cave art occurs in southern France and northern Spain where horses and bison are the most frequently depicted animal.

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February 24 2015

Are Siberia's mysterious craters caused by climate change? 4 new enormous holes in northern Russia


Four new mysterious giant craters have appeared in the Siberian permafrost in northern Russia, sparking fears that global warming may be causing gas to erupt from underground.

Scientists spotted the new holes, along with dozens of other smaller ones, in the same area as three other enormous craters that were spotted on the Yamal Peninsula last year.

The craters are thought to be caused by eruptions of methane gas from the permafrost as rising rising temperatures causes the frozen soil to melt.

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February 24 2015

Drones to scan for evidence of ancient civilizations in Amazonia


A UK-led initiative to scan the Amazon rainforest for new signs of ancient settlements was announced at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Jose, California. The project, which has already been awarded $1.9m grant from the European Research Council, will include conducting laser scans via drone.


Related: Christ the Redeemer mapped by drone to create first ever accurate model

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February 23 2015

Eye tracking is the next frontier of human-computer interaction


Eye tracking devices sound a lot more like expensive pieces of scientific research equipment than joysticks – yet if the latest announcements about the latest Assassin's Creed game are anything to go by, eye tracking will become a commonplace feature of how we interact with computers, and particularly games.

Eye trackers provide computers with a user's gaze position in real time by tracking the position of their pupils.

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February 23 2015

Maya Mural Reveals Ancient 'Photobomb'


An ancient Maya mural found in the Guatemalan rainforest may depict a group portrait of advisers to the Maya royalty, a new study finds.

Most Maya murals depict life within the royal sphere, but the newfound mural, uncovered in the Guatemalan rainforest in 2010, shows a vibrant scene of intellectuals consulting with the royal governor, who is dressed as the Maya wind god.

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February 23 2015

Did light-skinned, redheaded Neanderthal women hunt with the men?


A team of Spanish researchers theorizes, based on grooves and nicks on the teeth of Neanderthals, that gender roles among that species were similar to gender roles of modern Homo Sapiens. Neanderthal men prepared the cutting tools and weapons, while women saw to the leather garments and clothing.

But there was at least one duty that men and women may have shared: Neanderthal women, these researchers think, hunted big game with the men.

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February 23 2015

Evolution made humans compassionate before intelligent


Evolution led early humans to develop compassion and kindness before intelligence, a scientist has said.

Penny Spikins, from York University, has said normally we think of human evolution as being driven by intelligence – but this is not the case.


Alt: Skulls of early humans show they developed compassion up to 3 million years ago - before they could even SPEAK

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February 23 2015

Out of Africa: Did humans migrate quickly and all-at-once or in phases based on weather?


Considerable debate surrounds the migration of human populations out of Africa. Two predominant hypotheses concerning the timing contrast in their emphasis on the role of the Arabian interior and its changing climate. In one scenario, human populations expanded rapidly from Africa to southern Asia via the coastlines of Arabia approx. 50,000 to 60,000 years ago. Another model suggests that dispersal into the Arabian interior began much earlier (approx. 75,000 to 130,000 years ago) during multiple phases, when increased rainfall provided sufficient freshwater to support expanding populations.

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February 23 2015

Stone Age Skull Shows Striking Diversity


A piece of human skull could prove that early humans were incredibly diverse. The 22,000-year-old skull fragment, found at a site in Kenya, suggests that early humans living in Africa were much more varied than previously thought.

It appears the skull is not a new species, as it is clearly that of an anatomically modern human. However, it displays marked differences from skulls from the same time found in Africa and Europe.

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