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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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May 27 2015

Is This a 1.7-Million-Year-Old Man-Made Bridge?


According to ancient Indian legend, King Rama built a bridge between India and Sri Lanka more than a million years ago. Some have looked at NASA satellite images and noted what looks like the remnants of such a bridge. The question is whether it is man-made or a natural formation.

The Encyclopedia Britannica describes it as a “chain of shoals,” but notes: “Traditionally, it is said to be the remnant of a huge causeway constructed by Rama, the hero of the Hindu epic ‘Ramayana,’ to facilitate the passage of his army from India to Ceylon (Sri Lanka) for the rescue of his abducted wife, Sita.

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May 27 2015

Mission to Europa will test Jupiter moon's friendliness to life


Is Europa habitable? That's the big question that NASA hopes to answer in a future mission to the icy moon, slated to launch sometime in the 2020s. New details emerged on Tuesday when NASA revealed the nine scientific instruments chosen to chip away at Europa's mysteries.

Europa is thought to be the best candidate for hosting extraterrestrial life in the solar system, thanks to its suspected ocean beneath a crust of ice that could be up to several kilometres thick.

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May 27 2015

How Arctic ozone hole was avoided by Montreal Protocol


The Antarctic ozone hole would have been 40% bigger by now if ozone-depleting chemicals had not been banned in the 1980s, according to research.

Models also show that at certain times, a large hole would have opened up at the other end of the globe.

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May 27 2015

Saving coffee from extinction


Two billion cups of coffee are drunk around the world every day and 25 million families rely on growing coffee for a living. Over the past 15 years, consumption of the drink has risen by 43% - but researchers are warning that the world's most popular coffee, Arabica, is under threat.

Although there are 124 known species of coffee, most of the coffee that's grown comes from just two - Arabica and Robusta.

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May 27 2015

Scientists Conclusively Link BP Oil Spill with Unprecedented Dolphin Die-Off


Scientists have for the first time made a conclusive link between the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and an unprecedented dolphin die-off along the Gulf's northern coast.

Bottlenose dolphins in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama experienced an "unusual mortality event" beginning in February 2010 and continuing into 2014, according to the study, written by a team of 22 researchers.

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May 27 2015

Mammoth DNA could help ‘woolly elephants’ roam wild in Britain


The DNA of woolly mammoths could prevent endangered elephants dying out by equipping them with hardier genes

Woolly mammoth DNA could be used to make super hardy elephants which could roam wild in British countryside, an evolutionary biologist has suggested.


Related: How to Clone a Mammoth: But should we?

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May 27 2015

Java Sparrows: Percussionists of Bird World


Male Java sparrows (Lonchura oryzivora) produce bill-click sounds along with their songs during courtship displays as well as when they sing to themselves when alone, has found a team of ornithologists at Hokkaido University, Japan.

Birds may communicate using both vocalizations and movement, as for instance occurs during courtship displays, but scientists’ understanding of how they coordinate their movements with the sounds they produce is limited.

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May 27 2015

Animal behaviour: Inside the cunning, caring and greedy minds of fish


By revealing that fish cooperate, cheat and punish, Redouan Bshary has challenged ideas about brain evolution.

Redouan Bshary well remembers the moment he realized that fish were smarter than they are given credit for. It was 1998, and Bshary was a young behavioural ecologist with a dream project: snorkelling in Egypt's Red Sea to observe the behaviour of coral-reef fish. That day, he was watching a grumpy-looking grouper fish as it approached a giant moray eel.

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May 27 2015

Should animals have the same rights as humans?


A New York court will resume hearing a case this week about the possible illegal detention of two chimps at a university lab.

Lawyers acting for the chimps, Leo and Hercules, want them to be moved to an animal sanctuary.


Related: Many Americans Support Equal Rights for Animals

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May 27 2015

Can a little loving kindness improve our mental health?


Mindfulness -- an ancient Buddhist approach to meditation -- is attracting increasing attention in the 21st century as a non-invasive treatment for stress and depression. But can it improve mental well-being in young people?

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May 27 2015

Humans are able to learn abstract relations even before the first year of life


Two pennies can be considered the same -- both are pennies, just as two elephants can be considered the same, as both are elephants. Despite the vast difference between pennies and elephants, we easily notice the common relation of sameness that holds for both pairs. Analogical ability -- the ability to see common relations between objects, events or ideas -- is a key skill that underlies human intelligence and differentiates humans from other apes.


Related: Development of face perception earlier in Japanese children than Western children

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May 27 2015

Having children can permanently affect the female brain, studies claim


Having children can permanently affect the brain of women because the surge in female sex hormones during pregnancy can influence the development of key parts of the central nervous system, a series of studies has shown.

The findings suggest that childbirth can affect the female brain, but they could also shed light on the controversy over whether hormone replacement therapy in menopausal women affects the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in later life, scientists said.

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May 27 2015

Blood turned into nerve cells by Canadian researchers


Canadian scientists have discovered how to turn a simple blood sample from a man or woman into a variety of nerve cells, including those that are responsible for pain, numbness and other sensations.

The technology will allow researchers to test potential drugs for treating pain using the nerve cells in a lab, all based on an individual patient's own genetic signature, said Mick Bhatia, who led the team of researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton.

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May 27 2015

Iris scanners can now identify us from 40 feet away


Biometric technologies are on the rise. By electronically recording data about individual’s physical attributes such as fingerprints or iris patterns, security and law enforcement services can quickly identify people with a high degree of accuracy.

The latest development in this field is the scanning of irises from a distance of up to 40 feet (12 metres) away.

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May 26 2015

Uploading human brain for eternal life is possible – Cambridge neuroscientist


People could “live inside a machine” by turning their brain into a program code once a computer capable of recreating some 100 trillion connections is built, a popular Cambridge neuroscientist said at a UK mass event this weekend.

Although the human brain is enormously complex, scientists are beginning to better understand its separate parts’ functions, Critchlow said, describing the brain as a complex circuit board. The scientist claimed it “would be possible” to recreate it as a computer program.

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May 26 2015

Ecstasy may soon be a treatment for social anxiety among autistic adults


Researchers are planning the first pilot study of MDMA-assisted therapy for the treatment of social anxiety in autistic adults.

In a recent review in press in the journal, Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, a team of researchers led by Alicia Danforth, laid out their proposed methods and study rationale for what will be the first assessment of the therapeutic effects of MDMA, the active component of the street drug Ecstasy, for social anxiety in autistic adults.

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May 26 2015

Can you see what I hear? Blind human echolocators use visual areas of the brain


Certain blind individuals have the ability to use echoes from tongue or finger clicks to recognize objects in the distance, and use echolocation as a replacement for vision. Research shows echolocation in blind individuals is a full form of sensory substitution, and that blind echolocation experts recruit regions of the brain normally associated with visual perception when making echo-based assessments of objects.

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