News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  next  >>>

 

December 28 2014

6,000-Year-Old Temple Unearthed in Ukraine


A team of archaeologists led by Dr Mykhailo Videiko of the Kyiv Institute of Archaeology has discovered the remains of a 6,000-year-old temple at a Trypillian culture village near modern-day Nebelivka, Ukraine.

Trypillian culture derives its name from the village of Trypillia in Kyiv region, Ukraine, where artifacts of this ancient civilization were first discovered in 1896.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Archaeologists Investigate Early Modern Human Adaptability in South African Rock Shelters


A number of rock shelters and caves in South Africa have long been known to contain remarkable evidence for the cognitive abilities of some of our earliest modern human ancestors. Rock shelters and caves such as Blombos, Sibudu, Diepkloof, Spitzkloof, and Sehonghong have yielded stone tools, rock art and other evidence of an active human presence during the Middle Stone Age (280,000 – 50,000 years ago)—humans that, with the mounting evidence, seem to be more and more like us in terms of their thinking and creative abilities.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

The Englishman returning wildlife to Cambodia's Angkor Wat temple complex


The forests surrounding the ancient temple complex of Angkor Wat in Cambodia are once more echoing to the eerie, whooping calls of the pileated gibbon, a species, like so many in south-east Asia, that has been decimated by hunting and deforestation.

Conservationists have reintroduced the gibbons as part of an ambitious project for the "re-wilding" of Angkor Wat, a vast "temple city" that was once surrounded by forests teeming with deer, monkeys, birds and big cats before the arrival of commercial hunters with guns, traps and an appetite for money.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Satellite Photos Show Hundreds of Syrian Heritage Sites Damaged In Ongoing Fighting


It's no secret that ancient Syrian relics and heritage sites can be counted among the many victims in the country's ongoing civil war. Smugglers, looters and even government forces have been seen stealing ancient artifacts—trading history for cash and guns. Though some of the damage to historical sites can hardly be helped—heavy fighting on the streets has taken its toll on Aleppo, one of the world's oldest cities—the damage has been far more widespread.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Mysterious Explosions and Flashes, Filmed but Still Unexplained


Over the last few weeks, we have been hearing an awful lot about mysterious “bangs” that have been heard in various locales around the world. From the various recordings made of these noises, the sounds being reported often seem to bear the acoustic hallmarks of fireworks, military weapons and aircraft tests, and even thunder.


Related: Organized UFO Sky Watch in Yucatan

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

HIV May Decrease Hearing Ability


Adults with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have poorer hearing than those without the HIV infection, according to a recent study.

Researchers from San Diego State University in California found that high-frequency pure-tone average (HPTA) and low-frequency (LPTA) were significantly higher (i.e. poorer hearing) for adults with HIV compared with adults without the infection for the better ear.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Whooping cough proteins evolving 'unusually' fast


Whooping cough may be evolving to outsmart the currently used vaccine, say researchers.

Analysis of strains from 2012 shows the parts of the pertussis bacterium that the vaccine primes the immune system to recognise are changing.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

'Athena' is the first humanoid robot to be a paying airline passenger


Robots are becoming an ever-increasing presence in our lives, and today one will board a commercial airline as a passenger for the first time. According to the Los Angeles International Airport's Twitter feed, a humanoid robot named Athena will take off on a commercial Lufthansa flight to Germany this afternoon as a paid passenger. Athena is going to be accompanied by two scientists and is a full humanoid robot with a head, arms, and legs.


Alt: More images here

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Why living off the grid will get a lot easier in 25 years


In 25 years it won't be just doomsday preppers living off the grid.

As the technology behind renewable energy evolves—and improves—more consumers will opt to cut ties with utility companies and become their own power source.

Much like how people abandoned land lines for mobile devices, consumers will likely begin to adopt new ways of powering their homes instead of being completely reliant on utility companies.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Elon Musk: The new Tesla Roadster can travel some 400 miles on a single charge


Car nerds, you just got an extra present under the tree.

Tesla announced Friday an upgrade for its Roadster, the electric car company’s convertible model, and said that the new features significantly boost its range -- beyond what many traditional cars can get on a tank of gasoline.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

How algae can harvest precious metals and biofuel from mining’s toxic sludge


Groundbreaking project under way at Wheal Jane tin mine in Cornwall could have benefits worldwide

A groundbreaking research project to clean up a flooded Cornish tin mine is using algae to harvest the precious heavy metals in its toxic water, while simultaneously producing biofuel.

If the project, which is at a very early stage, is proven to work, it could have huge environmental benefits around the world.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

A Former Ground Zero Goes to Court Against the World’s Nuclear Arsenals


Tony de Brum was 9 years old in 1954 when he saw the sky light up and heard the terrifying rumbles of “Castle Bravo.” It was the most powerful of 67 nuclear tests detonated by the United States in the Marshall Islands, the remote Pacific atolls he calls home.

Six decades later, with Mr. de Brum now his country’s foreign minister, the memory of those thundering skies has driven him to a near-Quixotic venture: His tiny country is hauling the world’s eight declared nuclear powers and Israel before the International Court of Justice. He wants the court to order the start of long-promised talks for a convention to ban atomic arsenals, much like the treaties that already prohibit chemical, biological and other weapons of mass destruction.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Here's What Yellowstone's Thermal Springs Looked Like Before Humans Visited


Tourists from all over the world flock to Yellowstone's geothermal pools, like Morning Glory (seen above), to witness their brilliant hues. But according to a new study, those same visitors completely changed the pools' appearance.

The study, by researchers from Montana State University, used a mathematical model to analyze measurements taken at geothermal pools across Yellowstone to reconstruct what the pools might have looked like before humans first set foot in the area.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Belize's 'blue hole' may hold secret to Mayan demise


Everything from overhunting and a peasant uprising to deforestation and an alien invasion has been proposed to explain why the Mayan civilization collapsed, Smithsoniannotes.

But one theory has been gaining ground in recent years: extreme drought. Now more evidence has surfaced to support the drought postulation—and the proof may just lie in Belize's most famous underwater cave.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

Recordings That Made Waves: The Songs That Saved The Whales


In the mid-20th century, whale populations were dwindling. More than 50,000 whales were killed each year by commercial whalers.

But then in the 1960s, a song — or rather, many songs — sparked a movement.

It started with some underwater equipment that, for the first time, captured the sound of humpback whales.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 28 2014

OU professor wants to send 'pee power' to Mars


Not many would jump at the chance to drink their own urine, but professor Gerardine Botte hopes her "pee power" technology will have astronauts on Mars doing just that.

Botte, director of Ohio University's Center for Electrochemical Engineering Research, said she realized that hydrogen and water could be extracted from urine while working on fuel-cell technology in 2002. The fuel-grade hydrogen can be used to power an iPod or a small electronic device.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 27 2014

Mars Has 'Macroweather,' Just Like Earth


Mars, like Earth, experiences "macroweather" — atmospheric effects that lie in between short-term weather and long-term climate, researchers say.

The discovery might not only shed light on how Earth's atmosphere behaves but could also yield insights on all planets and moons with atmospheres, scientists added.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default