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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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February 1 2015

Regular Walking Can Help Ease Depression


Moderate-intensity exercise, or even just walking, can improve quality of life for depressed middle-aged women, a large Australian study suggests.

Women who averaged 150 minutes of moderate exercise (golf, tennis, aerobics classes, swimming, or line-dancing) or 200 minutes of walking every week had more energy, socialized more, felt better emotionally, and weren't as limited by their depression when researchers followed up after three years.

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February 1 2015

Sync your sport to your body clock for a personal best


From diet to running shoes to volcanic crater training, there are lots of ways to maximise sporting performance. For the most committed, there might be another option: timing the activity to suit your body clock.

Natural early risers, or larks, hit peak performance around noon, according to a study that tested elite hockey players at different times of the day. The night owls among them did best at around 7 pm – irrespective of what time they got up that day.

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February 1 2015

Future passwords will use typing style and other ‘cognitive fingerprints’


New password systems could look for physical clues about users instead of relying on passwords or fingerprint sensors.

New technologies are being developed by the US military that could recognise users by the rhythm and speed of their typing or the errors they make, or how they move mice.


Related: These Are The Worst Passwords You Could Have

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February 1 2015

Smart scarf carries multimodal language to convey emotions


A rise in wearables reflects an interest by designers and engineers to tread in self-help, fitness territory—smart watches to measure heart rates, medallions strapped to chests, biometric shirts. Now research from a University of Maryland researcher and Microsoft Research team has come up with a wearable concept that could aid in interpreting emotions. They are exploring the potential of wearable "affective technology" that may help people reflect on their own emotional state, modify their affect, and interpret the emotional states of others.

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February 1 2015

Forensic holodeck to transport jury to the crime scene


Guilty or innocent? To help them decide, judges and juries are often presented with reams of evidence: crime scene photos, medical documents or suspected bullet trajectories – all on paper. But could allowing people to watch the crime unfold from the comfort of the courtroom lead to more informed judgments?


Related: I just saw the first movie from Oculus, and it is the future

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February 1 2015

'Cold plasma' kills off norovirus


Norovirus, the most common cause of gastroenteritis in the world, can be killed with "cold plasma," researchers in Germany have reported.

The virus, which elicits vomiting and diarrhea, has gained international notoriety for causing outbreaks on cruise ships. However, such incidents represent merely a fraction of the tens of millions of cases that occur around the world each year.

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February 1 2015

Some potentially habitable planets began as gaseous, Neptune-like worlds


Two phenomena known to inhibit the potential habitability of planets -- tidal forces and vigorous stellar activity -- might instead help chances for life on certain planets orbiting low-mass stars, University of Washington astronomers have found.

In a paper published this month in the journal Astrobiology, UW doctoral student Rodrigo Luger and co-author Rory Barnes, research assistant professor, say the two forces could combine to transform uninhabitable "mini-Neptunes" -- big planets in outer orbits with solid cores and thick hydrogen atmospheres -- into closer-in, gas-free, potentially habitable worlds.

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February 1 2015

Mysterious Planet X May Really Lurk Undiscovered in Our Solar System


"Planet X" might actually exist — and so might "Planet Y."

At least two planets larger than Earth likely lurk in the dark depths of space far beyond Pluto, just waiting to be discovered, a new analysis of the orbits of "extreme trans-Neptunian objects" (ETNOs) suggests.

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February 1 2015

How 40,000 Tons of Cosmic Dust Falling to Earth Affects You and Me


Astrophysics and medical pathology don't, at first sight, appear to have much in common. What do sunspots have to do with liver spots? How does the big bang connect with cystic fibrosis?

Astrophysicist Karel Schrijver, a senior fellow at the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, and his wife, Iris Schrijver, professor of pathology at Stanford University, have joined the dots in a new book, Living with the Stars: How the Human Body is Connected to the Life Cycles of the Earth, the Planets, and the Stars.

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February 1 2015

Mars Fossils? Curiosity Rover Team Questions Report on Potential Microbe Traces


In a paper published last month in the journal Astrobiology, geobiologist Nora Noffke drew attention to features in Martian rocks that she suggested bore striking resemblance to trace fossils of microbial mats on Earth.

Not everyone agreed with her interpretation. As Curiosity's project scientist Ashwin Vasavada explained to other news outlets (including Space.com), the team had evaluated the features as non-biological, likely having been shaped by erosion or the transport of sand in water.

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February 1 2015

Have gamma rays killed off alien life? Extreme radiation may explain why we have not spotted ET


Powerful bursts of radiation may have wiped out life on the majority of other planets and even caused a major extinction on Earth, according to research.

Physicists have calculated that gamma-ray bursts - caused by some of the largest explosions in the universe - may have prevented the development of complex life in 90 per cent of galaxies.

The intense high energy radiation given off by these explosions is known to be lethal to even the most hardy of organisms and can strip away important gases in the atmosphere.

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February 1 2015

Missing link in metal physics explains Earth's magnetic field


Earth's magnetic field shields the life on our planet's surface from cosmic rays. It is generated by turbulent motions of liquid iron in Earth's core. Iron is a metal, which means it can easily conduct a flow of electrons. New findings show that a missing piece of the traditional theory explaining why metals become less conductive when they are heated was needed to complete the puzzle of this field-generating process.


Related: Metal explosions 'driven by charge'

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February 1 2015

Eyeglasses that turn into sunglasses—at your command


Imagine eyeglasses that can go quickly from clear to shaded and back again when you want them to, rather than passively in response to changes in light. Scientists report a major step toward that goal, which could benefit pilots, security guards and others who need such control, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

When wearers are driving or wearing a baseball cap, for example, the lenses stay clear rather than switching to a darker shade even in broad daylight.

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February 1 2015

Organ donors gave more than 2 million years of life to sick patients


Hearts, kidneys and other donated organs have added more than 2 million years to the lives of the American patients who received them, according to a new analysis.

That tally, published this week by the journal JAMA Surgery, covers 25 years of organ donation in the U.S. Researchers started with 1987, the year when the United Network for Organ Sharing began keeping track of all organ transplants in the U.S.

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February 1 2015

Vertical Gardens Beat Soil Made Salty by Climate Change


KHULNA, BANGLADESH—The soil in Knolkhol village in southwest Bangladesh has become increasingly salty because of incursions of seawater. The situation became particularly acute in the aftermath of Cyclone Aila in 2009, which brought storm surges that broke embankments and flooded farmland. After 2009 vegetable crops planted in the ground there yielded only meager returns—if they didn’t fail completely.

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February 1 2015

2,500-Year-Old Pharaonic Carvings, Two Obelisks Discovered in Egypt


A unique 2,500-year-old wall relief showing an unidentified pharaoh and two deities, a rare depiction of obelisks being cut and loaded onto boats, and two large sandstone obelisks have been discovered within the ancient quarry of Gebel el Silsila, 65 km north of Aswan, by archaeologists from the Gebel el Silsila Survey Project.

The ancient wall relief (46 x 38.5 cm in size) shows an unidentified Egyptian pharaoh presenting offerings to the gods Amun-Ra and Thoth, a unique combination rarely depicted as a pair. The combination of the pair may be due to a lunar aspect of the cult at Gebel el Silsila.

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January 31 2015

650-Year Drought Triggered Ancient City's Abandonment


A once-thriving Mesoamerican metropolis dried up about 1,000 years ago when below-average rainfall triggered centuries-long droughts that largely prompted people to abandon the city for greener opportunities, a new study finds.

Scientists have long debated whether it was drought or cultural forces that led to the abandonment of Cantona, a once-fortified city located just east of modern-day Mexico City.

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News desk archive...

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