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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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October 20 2014

Ancient fish reveals the roots of sex


The sexual act where two creatures physically join together to create new life first began 385 million years ago, according to a new fossil study.

The extinct Devonian-age armoured fish Microbrachius dicki, a kind of antiarch placoderm (the first jawed animals), had genital structures that enabled it to reproduce by internal fertilisation -- where the male inserts semen into the female.


Alt: Sex 'emerged in ancient Scottish lake'

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October 20 2014

Blind cave fish may provide insight on eye disease and other human health issues


Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit to teach us about the causes of many human ailments, including those that result in loss of sight. A team of researchers, led by Suzanne McGaugh, an assistant professor in the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences, is looking to the tiny eyeless fish for clues about the underpinnings of degenerative eye disease and more.

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October 20 2014

Did T. rex play with its food?


Washington — Tyrannosaurus rex, the seven-ton, dagger-toothed, Cretaceous-period killing machine, may have had a playful side, according to a University of Kansas paleontologist.

Professor Bruce Rothschild says that the 40-foot predator engaged in play, or at least exhibited behavior consistent with play seen in modern-day animals.

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October 20 2014

Human intestine grown in mouse for first time as scientists say there is hope to create 'spare parts


A segment of human intestine has been grown in laboratory mice for the first time as part of research that could one day produce transplant “spare parts” for repairing diseased tissues and organs using a patient’s own skin cells.

The miniature intestine grew from a single stem cell to the size of a fingertip and was able to carry out many of the functions associated with digesting and absorbing food, scientists said.

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October 20 2014

‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys


Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions.

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October 20 2014

Scientists prove ship's dog on the doomed Mary Rose was male


She was a scrappy sea mongrel who went down with her ship. Now nearly 500 years after Hatch the crossbreed drowned with the crew of the Mary Rose, it has emerged that the world's most famous sea dog, and the only known female aboard, was male.

Hatch's remains went on display four years ago at the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth, where some of the 19,000 objects from Henry VIII's ill-fated flagship are on show. She quickly became a popular attraction, but ongoing DNA testing of the crew has revealed the true sex of the unfortunate hound, which was named after divers discovered her remains near the hatch entrance to the Mary Rose's carpenter's cabin.

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October 20 2014

Scientists recreate 172-year-old shipwrecked beer


Three years ago, the oldest batch of still-drinkable beer was discovered off the coast of Finland, with living bacteria inside. Scientists have analysed the bacteria to successfully recreate the beer, which they're now selling locally.

Back in 2010, five bottles of beer and 168 bottles of champagne were found in a submerged schooner near the Åland Islands off the coast of Finland. The shipwreck is believed to have been down there since 1842, and the discovery remains the oldest batch of still-drinkable beer.

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October 20 2014

Anthropology Unveils clues about Roman gladiators’ eating habits


It has been found that Roman gladiators consumed a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors discovered during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos.

Historic sources claim that gladiators had their own diet, one that comprised of beans and grains. Contemporary reports referred to gladiators as “hordearii” “barley eaters”).

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October 20 2014

Unique 3,000-year-old Sanxingdui artifacts to be revealed in all their glory


Amid the once-tranquil village of Sanxingdui, in a quiet part of Sichuan province in China, a remarkable discovery took place which immediately attracted international attention and has since rewritten the history of Chinese civilisation. Two giant sacrificial pits were unearthed containing thousands of gold, bronze, jade, ivory and pottery artifacts that were so unusual and unlike anything ever found in China before, that archaeologists realised they had just opened the door to an ancient culture dating back between 3,000 and 5,000 years.

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October 20 2014

Skeletal Remains of “Old Giants” Reportedly Found in Russia


Modern researchers and proponents of the idea that a lost race of “giants” once existed on Earth have often looked to old newspaper reports for evidence of discoveries that involve human bones of exceptional size. Specifically, nineteenth century dailies were once rife with such reports, which are often dismissed offhandedly by skeptical researchers as being hoaxes.

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October 20 2014

Where Mud Is Archaeological Gold, Russian History Grew on Trees


VELIKY NOVGOROD, Russia — The note, from father to son, was the sort of routine shopping list that today would be dashed off on a smartphone. In 14th century Russia, it was etched into the bark of a birch tree and curled into a scroll.

The scroll and a dozen others like it were among the finds from this year’s digging season, adding to a collection of more than 1,000 birch-bark documents uncovered here after being preserved for hundreds of years in the magical mud that makes this city one of the most extraordinary archaeological sites on earth.

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October 20 2014

A Comet’s Brush With Mars


WASHINGTON — A comet the size of a small mountain whizzed past Mars on Sunday, dazzling space enthusiasts with the once-in-a-million-years encounter.

The comet, known as Siding Spring (C/2013 A1), made its closest encounter with Mars on Sunday at 2:27 p.m. E.D.T., racing past the Red Planet at a breakneck 126,000 miles per hour.

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October 20 2014

New solar cloud identified after space weather study


Research led by the University of Dundee has identified a new population of solar clouds – the `space weather’ that is generated by the Sun and thrown across the solar system.

The Sun always releases solar wind into the heliosphere, the area that defines our solar system. It also generates extreme events from solar flares, sending storms of energised particles across the solar system at light speed. These can be followed by huge magnetic clouds.

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October 20 2014

Partial Solar Eclipse to Darken US Skies This Week


Mark Thursday (Oct. 23) on your calendar as "Solar Eclipse Day," for if the weather cooperates, you should have no difficulty observing a partial eclipse of the sun.

Nearly all of North America, except for a portion of eastern Canada and a slice of eastern New England, will experience the partial solar eclipse this week. People who live east of a line running from roughly Quebec City to Montauk Point, New York, will miss out on the solar show, since the sun will set before the dark disc of the moon begins to encroach upon it.

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October 20 2014

Hot explosions on the cool sun


The Sun is more spirited than previously thought. Apart from the solar eruptions, huge bursts of particles and radiation from the outer atmosphere of our star, also the cooler layer right below can be the site of explosions: in some areas magnetic energy builds up and discharges within only a few minutes in temperature eruptions of up to 100000 degrees. Researchers under the lead of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research have now for the first time found evidence of such short-lived heat pockets in data from NASA's space telescope IRIS.

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October 20 2014

Air Umbrella creates “force field” that keeps you dry


Rainy days typically mean lugging around a soggy, wet umbrella – but that might not always be the case. Air Umbrella, which was developed by a company in China with the same name, uses forced air, not fabric, to make a canopy that keeps the raindrops from falling on your head. Once you have arrived at your destination, you can place the dry device in your bag until you’re ready to go out again.

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October 19 2014

What heaven's really like - by a leading brain surgeon who says he's been there


When I was a small boy, I was adopted. I grew up remembering nothing of my birth family and unaware that I had a biological sister, named Betsy. Many years later, I went in search of my biological family, but for Betsy it was too late: she had died.

This is the story of how I was reunited with her — in Heaven.

Before I start, I should explain that I am a scientist, who has spent a lifetime studying the workings of the brain.

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News desk archive...

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