Underwater Ruins

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Click for larger image(Left, above left & above) Terraces and steps: perspectives of the south face of the main monument, Yonaguni.
(Above right & right) Terraces and steps: prehistoric rock-hewn structures at Sacsayhuaman (above) and nearby Qenko (below) in the high Andes mountains of Peru.
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Click for larger image(Left) Turtle figure carved into the top of the eastern side of the main monument.
(Below left & below) Two views of the "Basin", a pool-like structure near the apex of the main monument. It features a right-angled internal corner, sheltered by surrounding elevations.
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Click for larger imageClick for larger image(Above) View of the internal right-angle of the Basin. It is difficult to see how such a feature in such a protected setting could have been produced solely by natural forces such as waves or tidal action.
(Right and far right) Graham Hancock diving in the "Basin" at Yonaguni.
(Below) A series of three vertical holes run in alignment along the Basin's straight edge. Some geologists have described them as pot-holes, which they may well be. However their direct and immediate association with another curious feature - the Basin itself - should force us to consider other possibilities as well.
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Click for larger image(Right) Megalithic entrance tunnel leading to parallel megaliths.
(Below right) Parallel megalithic blocks oriented east to west and lying at the north-west corner of the main monument.
(Below) Parallel megaliths with diver for scale.
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(Above) Curious feature, close to parallel megaliths, with an apparent curving sloped stone path flanked by parallel curving walls.Click for larger image(Left) Second area of terracing half a kilometre south of the main monument. Found at the base of a sheltered east-west defile and at a depth of 27 metres, it could not have been subjected to the &wave and tidal forces& that some geologists believe were responsible for the Yonaguni anomalies.
Click for larger image(Left & right) Two-ton megalith surmounting a carved platform 300 metres to the east of the main monument.Click for larger image
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All photographic images are copyright © 1999 Santha Faiia. None of the images may be reproduced without the prior written permission of the copyright holder.

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