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Author of the Month

Henry Hudson in a Time of Prophecy
By Evan Pritchard

Books by Evan Pritchard

Henry Hudson and the Algonquins of New York

Henry Hudson and the Algonquins of New York

US - UK - CA

Native New Yorkers

Native New Yorkers

US - UK - CA

Native American Stories of the Sacred

Native American Stories of the Sacred

US - UK - CA

No Word For Time

No Word For Time

US - UK - CA

Evan Pritchard

For August 2010 Author of the Month on the Graham Hancock web site we a pleased to welcome writer, seeker and teacher Evan Pritchard. Evan is a descendant of the Micmac people (part of the Algonquin nations) and is the founder of The Center for Algonquin Culture. He has taught in Native American studies at Marist and Vassar Colleges, and Pace University, and is currently Professor of Native American history at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, where he also teaches ethics and philosophy.

He is the author of Henry Hudson and the Algonquins of New York and Native New Yorkers, The Legacy of the Algonquin People of New York.

He is also the author of the widely praised No Word For Time, the Way of the Algonquin People, and many other books, including an Algonkian language series.

Professor Pritchard has given "Native New Yorker" walking tours of lower Manhattan for the Smithsonian Institute, The Open Center, South Street Seaport, and other institutions. He has recently shared his findings on Native American life in Manhattan on Leonard Lopate's New York And Company show, on WBAI/ Pacifica Radio, ABC news, several NPR shows, New Dimensions, Maryknoll Productions and on other stations around the country. Native Peoples Magazine published a feature article on Native New Yorkers in the November/December 2002 issue, and a recent Village Voice cover article by Erik Baard was based, in part, on Pritchard's book

Please welcome Evan Pritchard to the www.grahamhancock.com Forum and message boards. See his website at http://www.wilkesweb.us/algonquin/index.htm

Henry Hudson in a Time of Prophecy
Excepts and Essays by Evan Pritchard

There are a great number of issues addressed in my new book Henry Hudson and the Algonquins of New York. In this essay, I will focus on the Seven Fires Prophecies and the mathematical problems they present in terms of astronomy and the timing of human events. I welcome your polite comments.
Evan Pritchard
7/21/10

Excerpt from Chapter One: Henry Hudson and the Algonquins of New York
by Evan T. Pritchard, published by Council Oak Books 2009

.…It should not be surprising to learn that the Algonquin perspective concerning Henry Hudson’s historic visit would be different than that told in most English history books. I for one firmly believe that the saga of the Half Moon of 1609 began 392 years before, on a tiny island in the Bay of Fundy still called Fire Island by the Mi’kmaq people who live nearby and who consider it a sacred shrine. It was there in what would become St. Johns, New Brunswick, Canada, that a series of eight prophets arrived, according to the Red Sky Scrolls. They brought warnings for the future and teachings for the ages. They brought these to the Algonquian speaking people, and, so some believe, for all humankind. They spoke of “medicine wheels,” and hoops within hoops of what we’d call ecosystems, and hoops within hoops of what we’d call “time,” though there still today is no such word in the local language of the Mi’kmaq people.

In order to warn the people of certain moments far into the future at which time they would have to make decisions that might affect the future of the planet, the prophets provided a calendar of sorts. There was already a cycle of the day and the positions of the sun and moon; already a cycle of the month, which went from new moon to new moon; and there was a solar “year” and a lunar “year” marked out on the backs of “moon turtles.” The prophets also taught of a “life walk” cycle, of 56 years, 14 years per each of the four directions, which each of us walks in our own way. I was taught by Wabanaki elders (the late Irvin Polchis among others) that this wheel or hoop took 56 years to complete, 14 years per each of the directions [traveling clockwise starting in the east at birth and arriving in the south at the age of 14, arriving in the west at age 28, arriving in the north at age 42, and coming full circle in the east again at 56. This wheel corresponds with the moon wheel around the edge of certain turtles’ backs, such as the spotted pond turtle and the snapper, which is divided into 28 scutes by nature. Several of the great stone Medicine Wheels on the eastern slope of the continental divide have 28 spokes, and even suggest the turtle’s shape in other ways as well. Divide each of these spaces in two and you have your 56 spoke wheel as can be used as a calculator to keep track of the “life walk” cycles.]

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