News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  next  >>>

 

March 18 2015

Older Really Can Mean Wiser


Behind all those canned compliments for older adults — spry! wily! wise! — is an appreciation for something that scientists have had a hard time characterizing: mental faculties that improve with age.

Knowledge is a large part of the equation, of course. People who are middle-aged and older tend to know more than young adults, by virtue of having been around longer, and score higher on vocabulary tests, crossword puzzles and other measures of so-called crystallized intelligence.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

Repeated remembering 'wipes similar memories'


Recalling a particular memory can cause us to forget another, similar memory - and neuroscientists have now watched this process happen using brain scans.

Inside the brains of human subjects, they pinpointed the unique imprints of two visual memories that were triggered by the same word.


Alt: Memories Weaken Without Reinforcement, Study Finds

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

Breast-Feeding Boosts Chances Of Success, Study In Brazil Finds


Babies who are breast-fed may be more likely to be successful in life, a provocative study published Tuesday suggests.

The study followed more than 3,000 babies into adulthood in Brazil. The researchers found those who were breast-fed scored slightly higher in intelligence tests in their 30s, stayed in school longer and earned more money than those who were given formula.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

A Hug a Day Keeps the Doctor Away


During my final semester of undergrad, I made two signs that read, “Feeling stressed about exams? Have a free hug!” Then I recruited a friend and we stood in the entrance of the campus library, held up the signs, and waited. Passerbys had one of two reactions: Either they quickly looked down at their phones and awkwardly shuffled by, or their faces lit up as they embraced us. Most people were enthusiastic. Some exclaimed, “You made my day!” or “Thank you. I needed this.” One leapt into my arms, nearly toppling me over. After two hours of warm interactions, my friend and I couldn’t believe how energized and happy we felt.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

Severe Solar Storm Paints the Sky Green on St. Patrick's Day


Green beer and emerald rivers? Pah. How about a vibrant light show of green and red auroras dancing across the night sky. Earth is currently experiencing a "severe" solar storm, probably due to clouds of charged particles that came racing off the sun on March 15. When high-speed particles from such coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, hit our atmosphere, they excite molecules of gas in the air and trigger brilliant displays of lights, most commonly around the Poles.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

A second minor planet may possess Saturn-like rings


There are only five bodies in our solar system that are known to bear rings. The most obvious is the planet Saturn; to a lesser extent, rings of gas and dust also encircle Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune. The fifth member of this haloed group is Chariklo, one of a class of minor planets called centaurs: small, rocky bodies that possess qualities of both asteroids and comets.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

Superconductors Could Help Physicists Find 'Gravity Particles'


It may be possible to draw energy from a vacuum using gravity, a theoretical physicist says.

If researchers succeed in showing that this can happen, it could prove the long-postulated existence of the graviton, the particle of gravity, and perhaps bring scientists one step closer to developing a "theory of everything" that can explain how the universe works from its smallest to largest scales.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 18 2015

Ice makes unlikely rocket fuel for CubeSats


Ice would make a fine rocket fuel, if you're a CubeSat.

These lightweight, low-cost satellites are made up of 1 litre modules, making them popular for student projects. Once they have hitched a ride into Earth orbit, they can do real science, such as monitoring the atmosphere or searching for extrasolar planets.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Flying car will go on sale in 2017, Aeromobil says


Ever wanted to buy a flying car? You only have a couple more years to wait, says a company that has built prototypes that can both drive and fly.

The flying roadster, a sporty two seater that transforms into a light sports aircraft, aims to go on sale in just two years from Slovakia-based Aeromobil.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Robot capable of sorting through and folding piles of rumpled clothes


Advancements in robotics have enabled humankind to automate a whole range of industrial processes, leading to more efficient and safer production and helping to expand our knowledge through scientific discovery. Why is it, however, that we can send a robot into space to take samples of Martian rocks, but still can't delegate the ironing to a household robot?

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

This Chemistry 3D Printer Can Synthesize Molecules From Scratch


Say you're a medical researcher interested in a rare chemical produced in the roots of a little-known Peruvian flower. It's called ratanhine, and it's valuable because it has some fascinating anti-fungal properties that might make for great medicines. Getting your hands on the rare plant is hard, and no chemical supplier is or has ever sold it. But maybe, thanks to the work of University of Illinois chemist Martin Burke, you could print it right in the lab.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Bio-Art: 3D-Printed Faces Reconstructed from Stray DNA


Do you know where all your DNA is?

From stray hairs to wads of gum, people shed their cells in public spaces all the time. And that physical detritus contains a surprising amount of information, experts say.

Because DNA can reveal so much about the person who left it behind, its casual presence everywhere could endanger people's security and privacy.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Ancient ‘sex switch’ comes out of retirement


Scientists have brought a retired sex gene in mammals back to life—proving it can still switch on male development in mice, despite not having done so for millions of years.

The gene Dmrt1 is no longer used by mammals to determine sex but still plays a key role in determining sex in many vertebrates, including frogs, fish, and birds.

The work provides valuable insights into the evolution of genes responsible for determining sex in humans and animals, researchers say.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Why the coco-de-mer evolved such giant seeds


The fruit of the double coconut palm or coco-de-mer, which houses the tree’s enormous seeds, are the largest among plants. The fruit can weigh up to roughly 39 pounds and can reach a diameter of over one-and-a-half feet.

The palm has developed a clever mechanism to optimize the provision of nutrients for itself and its offspring—and as a result produces large seeds. It is the only plant species that takes care of its offspring in order to increase their chances of survival.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

The perils of feeding bread to ducks


It's a seemingly innocent pastime. But experts warn that feeding ducks bread is not just bad for the bird's health - it can damage entire ecosystems, says Justin Parkinson.

Throwing crumbs of stale bread in a pond or river is a ritual of family days out dating back to at least the 19th Century.


Alt: Feed ducks frozen peas instead of stale bread, charity asks

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Ancient whale swam hundreds of miles up African river


A 22-foot beaked whale that apparently took a wrong turn up an African river about 17 million years ago may offer clues to the climate-change forces that shaped human evolution.

Lost for more than 30 years, the fossilized beak with part of the jaw bone helps determine that the East African Plateau probably began rising no earlier than 17 million years ago, according to a study published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 17 2015

Himalayan Yeti 'Mystery' Looks Even Less Mysterious, Scientists Argue


Mystery solved? Not Yeti, but close. A year ago, geneticists reported that RNA extracted from hair samples attributed to the Himalayan Yeti monster, a.k.a. "the Abominable Snowman," were actually most similar to the 40,000-year-old genetic signature of a now-extinct breed of polar bear. They suggested there might be a yet-to-be-discovered bear species lurking in the remote Himalayan snows.

Now a different research team says the hairs were just as likely to come from a type of brown bear that's common in the Himalayas.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default