News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  next  >>>

 

November 14 2014

Research suggests Jupiter's Great Red Spot is caused by the Sun


The Great Red Spot is the distinguishing feature that makes Jupiter one of the most easily recognizable planets in our solar system. Until recently, it was widely believed that this blemish was formed as a result of reddish-colored chemicals rising up from within the planet itself. However, using information obtained by analysis of data from the Cassini fly-by mission of Jupiter, researchers working at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have discerned that the planet's Great Red Spot may have more to do with the external action of the sun than some internal mechanism.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 14 2014

Mars' Atmosphere Provides Insights into Weather on Venus, Saturn's Titan &amp; the Gas Giants


New research on Mars weather promises to advance scientists’ understanding of the dynamics of Earth’s own atmosphere – and could provide insights into the weather of Venus, Saturn’s moon Titan, and possibly the gas giants Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

The new study finds a three-part pattern applies to atmospheric conditions on Mars. The results also show that the sun plays a major role in determining macroweather. “Macroweather,” has been used to describe the relatively stable regime between weather and climate. The findings indicate that weather on Mars can be predicted with some skill up to only two days in advance, compared to Earth’s 10 days.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 14 2014

Could There Be Organic Matter on Mars?


Several Mars lander missions have detected chloromethane, a chemical sometimes produced by living organisms, but most scientists think the findings were contamination from Earth.

Now, a team of researchers has replicated these experiments on a meteorite found on Earth, and found that it produced chloromethane from organic materials contained in the space rock. The findings suggest the chloromethane on Mars may have come from meteorite debris on the planet's surface or the Martian soil itself, rather than from Earths.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 14 2014

Strange comet behaviour puzzles researchers


Two comets from the far-flung reaches of the Solar System are surprising astronomers with how much dust they are putting out — or not.

Comet Siding Spring barrelled past Mars on 19 October, enveloping the planet in a billowing cloud of dust and lighting up the Martian atmosphere. But astronomers have also spotted a mysteriously dust-free object from the Oort cloud, the deep-freeze reservoir beyond Neptune that is the origin of many comets, including Siding Spring.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 14 2014

Rare Mineral Discovered in Ancient Meteorite Impact Crater


A rare mineral known from just three massive meteorite impacts has now turned up in a Wisconsin crater.

Researchers discovered the mineral, called reidite, at the Rock Elm impact structure in western Wisconsin. Reidite is a dense form of zircon, one of the hardiest minerals on Earth.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 14 2014

First Views From Inside Those Mysterious Siberian Holes


When is the best time to explore a mysterious crater that opened unexpectedly in the Siberian tundra with no warning and no explanation? When it’s frozen and whatever is inside is plugged up with ice, of course. That’s why researchers from the Russian Centre of Arctic Exploration waited until winter (isn’t it always winter in Siberia?) before rappelling down the sides of the largest crater found earlier this year in the northern Siberia area of Yamal.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 14 2014

Listen to a Glacier, Forecast a Flood


They’re not as catchy as Vanilla Ice’s self-aggrandizing single, nor as funky as the pioneering blues of Muddy Waters. But tuning in to the harmonies produced as water courses through icy cracks in a glacier could eventually come as life-saving music to the ears of their neighbors.

Scientists recently analyzed data that was collected using seismometers during two summer months at a Swiss Alps glacier in 2007. They discovered potentially revelatory harmonic properties of ice quakes, which are minor rumbles produced when cracks in the ice are reshaped by water flowing through them.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Rosetta's comet sings a mysterious 'song'


The Rosetta mission has detected a mysterious signal coming from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Plasma is a charged gas and the RPC is tasked with understanding variations in the comet's activity, how 67P's jets of vapour and dust interacts with the solar wind and the dynamic structure of the comet's nucleus and coma.

But when recording signals in the 40-50 millihertz frequency range, the RPC scientists stumbled on a surprise — the comet was singing, they report.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Comet Landing A Success: European Craft Makes 'Fairly Gentle Touchdown'


Hundreds of millions of miles from Earth, a man-made object was flung at a comet Wednesday — and now it's sticking to the rock as it hurtles through space.

"We are on the comet," Stephan Ulamec, Philae Lander Manager, announced Wednesday, marking a historic achievement.


Alt: Problems hit Philae after historic first comet landing
Alt: Landing on a Comet, a Mission Aims to Unlock the Mysteries of Earth
Alt: Philae has landed – first image from the surface

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Twisted light sends Mozart record distance through air


MOZART and Schrödinger flew through the air over Vienna recently. Their digital images were encoded in twisted green light, marking an important step towards long-distance communication in free space.

Light offers the best way to communicate between Earth and orbiting satellites, but atmospheric turbulence can destroy the signal. Polarised light is resistant to the effects of turbulence, but polarised photons can carry only one bit of information apiece. So researchers have looked for other properties of light that could boost the bit rate.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Electric Barrier 'Punches' Sharks in the Nose


A high-tech version of the reputedly life-saving punch to a shark's nose is being tested in an effort to protect humans without harming the toothy predators or other sea creatures.

In the blue waters of a small bay in Cape Town, a revolutionary experiment with an electronic barrier seeks to exploit the super-sensitivity of a sharks' snout to keep swimmers and surfers safe.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Sleep conditioning with rotten eggs can help kick smoking habit


Kicking the tobacco habit is difficult, as any smoker will tell you. Various methods of suasion administered while he's awake are pretty useless. But new research done in Israel indicates that conditioning during sleep, with the help of particularly revolting smells, may help do the trick.


Alt: Behavioral changes seen after sleep learning: Volunteers smoked less after a night of olfactory conditioning

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

No magic gene behind supercentenarians' longevity


WHAT does it take to live to a 110? If supercentenarians have a magic gene that helps them reach this age, it is lying low. A thorough search for longevity gene variants in 17 supercentenarians – average age 112 (the oldest was 116) – has drawn a blank.

Previous studies identified genes coding for proteins that might play an important role in longevity, including insulin-like growth factor-1.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Gut–brain link grabs neuroscientists


Idea that intestinal bacteria affect mental health gains ground.

Companies selling ‘probiotic’ foods have long claimed that cultivating the right gut bacteria can benefit mental well-being, but neuroscientists have generally been sceptical. Now there is hard evidence linking conditions such as autism and depression to the gut’s microbial residents, known as the microbiome. And neuroscientists are taking notice — not just of the clinical implications but also of what the link could mean for experimental design.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Bilingual People Are Like Brain 'Bodybuilders'


People who speak two languages may have brains that are more efficient at language processing and other tasks, new research suggests.

Scientists have long assumed that the "bilingualism advantage" — the enhanced ability to filter out important information among nonimportant material — stems from how bilingual people process language. The new study confirms that assumption, and goes on to suggest that bilingual people are more efficient at higher-level brain functions such as ignoring other irrelevant information, said Ellen Bialystok, a psychologist at York University in Toronto, who was not involved in the research.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Why Chimps Haven't Evolved Culture Like Humans


Human culture is remarkably varied, characterized by differences in religion, dress and social customs. Chimpanzees, humanity's closest living relatives, differ from group to group, too. But chimp culture is not nearly as complex as human culture.

Now, a new study hints at one reason why: Chimps just aren't as motivated to learn from one another as humans are.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
November 13 2014

Do homing pigeons navigate with gyroscope in brain?


No one knows how homing pigeons do it, but now a team of Swiss and South African scientists have discovered that the bird's navigation is affected by disturbances in gravity, suggesting that they navigate using a gravity map and that they may carry an internal gyroscope to guide them home.

Human communication has long been associated with an unlikely companion, the homing pigeon; but how these pigeons find their way home is still largely a mystery.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default