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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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February 21 2015

Why the Washington Monument Has ‘Shrunk’ By 10 Inches


Symbol of the nation's capital loses a little of its stature

The Washington Monument now stands 10 inches shorter than when it was completed in 1884, or at least that’s what a new government measurement announced Monday suggests.


Related: North american plate shattered speed records a billion years ago

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February 21 2015

Colombia seeks 'environmental corridor' across Andes, Amazon


Colombia on Monday proposed creating an "environmental corridor" across northern South America to protect a vast, biologically rich swath of mountains and jungle from the impact of climate change.


Related: World's largest offshore wind farm approved for UK coast

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February 21 2015

Utah Suicides Linked to Air Pollution


Suicide may be linked to air pollution, according to new research that finds spikes in completed suicides in the days following peak pollution levels.

The research took place in Utah, part of the United States' western "suicide belt." Suicide is the 10th-leading cause of death in the United States; in Utah, it is the eighth. Though the notion that suicide and air quality could be linked may not seem intuitive, similar studies in South Korea, Taiwan and Canada have also linked the two.

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February 21 2015

An Empty Stomach Can Lead to an Empty Wallet


UMN study reveals hunger influences purchase decisions in the nonfood domain

Looking to save money on your next shopping trip? Better eat something before you head to the mall. According to new research from the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, hunger increases our intention to acquire not only food, but also nonfood objects.

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February 21 2015

Judge a man by his fingers? Link between lengths of fingers and male behavior towards women


Men with short index fingers and long ring fingers are on average nicer towards women. This phenomenon stems from their fetal life, and the hormones these men have been exposed to in their mother's womb. The findings might help explain why these men have more children.

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February 21 2015

New tattoo removal cream promises to fade ink, doesn't hurt and only costs £3


A Canadian student has developed a new method of tattoo removal that could save people a good deal of pain and expense, allowing them to get rid of regrettable tats by simply rubbing cream into them.

"When comparing it to laser-based tattoo removal, in which you see the burns, the scarring, the blisters, in this case, we've designed a drug that doesn't really have much off-target effect," 27-year-old PhD student and inventor Alec Falkenham told CBC.

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February 21 2015

Tobacco plants could help dying bumblebees stay healthy


Chomping on tobacco is not the first thing that springs to mind when considering how to lead a healthier life – yet the nicotine-rich plant is exactly what bees should feast on if they want to reverse their alarming decline.

Scientists have discovered the naturally occurring chemicals found in the flowers of tobacco and other plants can reduce infection levels of a common bumblebee parasite by more than 80 per cent.

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February 21 2015

Ants Maintain 'Toilets' in Their Nests, First-Ever Study Shows


The first in-depth look at ant bathroom habits has found that some of the insects maintain "toilets" in their intricate underground colonies.

Scientists studying black garden ants discovered that the bugs pile their waste in dedicated corners of their nests. This makes sense: With thousands of ants confined to such a small space, organization is key.


Related: Tropical fire ants traveled the world on 16th century ships

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February 20 2015

A New Theory on How Neanderthal DNA Spread in Asia


In 2010, scientists made a startling discovery about our past: About 50,000 years ago, Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of living Europeans and Asians.

Now two teams of researchers have come to another intriguing conclusion: Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of Asians at a second point in history, giving them an extra infusion of Neanderthal DNA.

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February 20 2015

Ancient Shrines Used for Predicting the Future Discovered


Three shrines, dating back about 3,300 years, have been discovered within a hilltop fortress at Gegharot, in Armenia.

Local rulers at the time likely used the shrines for divination, a practice aimed at predicting the future, the archaeologists involved in the discovery say.

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February 20 2015

Meditation booms as people seek a way to slow down


Meditation, primarily a 2,500-year-old form called mindfulness meditation that emphasizes paying attention to the present moment, has gone viral.

The unrelenting siege on our attention can take a good share of the credit; stress has bombarded people from executives on 24/7 schedules to kids who feel the pressure to succeed even before puberty. Meditation has been lauded as a way to reduce stress, ease physical ailments like headaches and increase compassion and productivity.


Related: Watkins’ Spiritual 100 List for 2015

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February 20 2015

Human DNA enlarges mouse brains


For centuries, biologists have wondered what made humans human. Once the human and chimp genomes were deciphered about a decade ago, they realized they could now begin to pinpoint the molecular underpinnings of our big brain, bipedalism, varied diet, and other traits that have made our species so successful. By 2008, almost two dozen computerized comparisons of human and ape genomes had come up with hundreds of pieces of DNA that might be important. But rarely have researchers taken the next steps to try to prove that a piece of DNA really made a difference in human evolution.

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February 20 2015

Brain-altering devices have hit the mainstream


Motivation and habit change are hard, and no heart-monitoring bracelet is going to magically solve that problem.

But there are wearables that can. Thync, a brain-shocking wearable, has been heralded as the first mood-altering device on the market. Through gentle shocks, you can use Thync to give yourself energy or calm yourself down, and the team is working on expanding those capabilities.

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February 20 2015

A good night's sleep keeps your stem cells young


Environmental stress is a major factor in driving DNA damage in adult hematopoietic stem cells, researchers have found, concluding that a good night's sleep keeps your stem cells "young."


Related: Support for sleeping in? Half of parents favor later school start times for teens
Related: Common biomarkers of sleep debt found in humans, rats

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February 20 2015

Beethoven’s own irregular heart rhythms may have inspired his most famous works


Many scientists have speculated that Beethoven had an arrhythmia (an abnormal heart rhythm), and some of his music is evidence of that. It seems that certain parts of the opening of the Piano Sonata in E-flat major (Opus 81a) were “transpositions” of irregular heart rhythms.

In fact, in the book A History of the Disorders of Cardiac Rhythms by German electrophysiologist Berndt Lüderitz, he mentions that Beethoven was thought to have an arrhythmia. I looked further and found that a few others had mentioned this as well.

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February 20 2015

Crocodiles Play, Too, Study Says—Why Do Animals Have Fun?


Several crocodile relatives amuse themselves by splashing water and giving each other piggyback rides, a new study says.

When Vladimir Dinets first heard several years ago that a Cuban crocodile at Ohio's Toledo Zoo appeared to be playing with an inflatable ball, he didn't think anything of it—at first.

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February 20 2015

Sea Snail Teeth Top Spider Silk as Strongest Material on Earth


Step aside, Spider-Man: The world's strongest stuff isn't your silk; it's sea snail teeth.

The teeth of the common limpet species (Patella vulgata) are tougher than Kevlar and stronger than spider silk, researchers report in the Feb. 18 issue of the Royal Society journal Interface.

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News desk archive...

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