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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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October 16 2014

Were Lunar Volcanoes Active When Dinosaurs Roamed the Earth?


The Moon’s a very dusty museum where the exhibits haven’t changed much over the last 4 billion years. Or so we thought. NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has provided researchers strong evidence the Moon’s volcanic activity slowed gradually instead of stopping abruptly a billion years ago.


Related: Violent eruptions in Mercury's past could hold clues to its formation

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October 16 2014

First Photos of Water Ice on Mercury Captured by NASA Spacecraft


The first-ever photos of water ice near Mercury's north pole have come down to Earth, and they have quite a story to tell.

The images, taken by NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft (short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging), suggest that the ice lurking within Mercury's polar craters was delivered recently, and may even be topped up by processes that continue today, researchers said.

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October 16 2014

Bizarre 'pyramid' on comet: How did it get there?


The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has sent home several spectacular images that show a large pyramid-shaped boulder studding the surface of its target comet.

Rosetta mission team members have named the 82-foot-tall (25 meters) boulder on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko "Cheops," after the largest pyramid in Egypt's famous Giza complex. The rock is much smaller than its namesake, however, which rises 456 feet (139 m) into the Egyptian sky.

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October 16 2014

First Alien “Ice-Giant” Planet Found


Our view of other star systems just got a little more familiar, with the discovery of a planet 25,000 light-years away that resembles our own Uranus (Voyager 2 image above). Astronomers have discovered hundreds of planets around the Milky Way, including rocky planets similar to Earth and gas planets similar to Jupiter. But there is a third type of planet in our solar system—part gas, part ice—and this is the first time anyone has spotted a twin for our so-called “ice giant” planets, Uranus and Neptune.

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October 16 2014

Milky Way Has Half As Much Dark Matter As Previously Thought


For years, mysterious dark matter has eluded scientists, and now, a new study shows there may be less of it to find.

Using a century-old equation, scientists have found that the Milky Way galaxy holds half as much dark matter — the invisible stuff believed to make up a sizable chunk of the universe — as scientists had previously thought.

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October 16 2014

Early galaxies were bad at making stars


Star formation in the early universe was far less efficient than it is now, confirms new research.

Based on observations of the star-producing power of two nearby galaxies, the study offers astronomers a fresh insight into the early Universe.

"We believe this is the first observational evidence to confirm theoretical predictions that star formation was not as efficient in early galaxies compared to spiral galaxies such as our Milky Way,".

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October 16 2014

Scientists Close In on Creating Black Hole in Lab


Scientists have come closer than ever before to creating a laboratory-scale imitation of a black hole that emits Hawking radiation, the particles predicted to escape black holes due to quantum mechanical effects.

The black hole analogue, reported in Nature Physics, was created by trapping sound waves using an ultra cold fluid. Such objects could one day help resolve the so-called black hole ‘information paradox’ - the question of whether information that falls into a black hole disappears forever.

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October 15 2014

Earth’s magnetic field could flip within a human lifetime


It’s not as bizarre as it sounds. Earth’s magnetic field has flipped – though not overnight – many times throughout the planet’s history. Its dipole magnetic field, like that of a bar magnet, remains about the same intensity for thousands to millions of years, but for incompletely known reasons it occasionally weakens and, presumably over a few thousand years, reverses direction.

Now, a new study by a team of scientists from Italy, France, Columbia University and the University of California, Berkeley, demonstrates that the last magnetic reversal 786,000 years ago actually happened very quickly, in less than 100 years – roughly a human lifetime.

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October 15 2014

Ecstasy and Acid in Your Medicine Cabinet? Doctors Explore Psychedelics


Graham is quoted in this article from Newsweek:


Psychedelics, the drugs of choice for many in the 1960s counterculture movement, may be making a comeback in the most straight-laced of places: research labs and doctors’ offices.

Scientists, doctors and scholars who have researched the health potential of drugs such as LSD, magic mushrooms and ecstasy, gathered at the Horizons conference in New York City this past weekend to discuss innovations in the field.

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October 15 2014

Embryonic Stem Cells Restore Vision In Preliminary Human Test


Scientists are reporting the first strong evidence that human embryonic stem cells may be helping patients.

The cells appear to have improved the vision in more than half of the 18 patients who had become legally blind because of two progressive, currently incurable eye diseases.


Alt: Stem cells improve vision enough for horse riding

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October 15 2014

Study shows increase of CO2 in the atmosphere is lower than predicted because of plants


A team of researchers in the U.S. claims that climate models used to predict the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere are approximately 17 percent too high because they incorrectly approximate how much CO2 plants pull from the atmosphere. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they studied the ability of plants to absorb increased amounts of CO2 and discovered that they are capable of pulling more out of the atmosphere than has been previously thought and the difference is approximately equal to the error difference reported by simulation models.

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October 15 2014

Storing greenhouse gas underground—for a million years


When Canada switched on its Boundary Dam power plant earlier this month, it signaled a new front in the war against climate change. The commercial turbine burns coal, the dirtiest of fossil fuels, but it traps nearly all the resulting carbon dioxide underground before it reaches the atmosphere. Part of this greenhouse gas is pumped into porous, water-bearing underground rock layers.


Related: Hydraulic fracturing linked to earthquakes in Ohio

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October 15 2014

1934 drought was worst of the last millennium, study finds


The 1934 drought was by far the most intense and far-reaching drought of the last 1,000 years in North America, and was caused in part by an atmospheric phenomenon that may have also led to the current drought in California, according to a new study.

New research finds that the extent of the 1934 drought was approximately seven times larger than droughts of comparable intensity that struck North America between 1000 A.D. and 2005, and nearly 30 percent worse than the next most severe drought that struck the continent in 1580.

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October 15 2014

Elephants Able To Detect Rainstorms 150 Miles Away


Lions may be the kings of the animal world, but at least elephants could make for spunky meteorologists. New research is revealing that elephants have a radar-like spidey sense, capable of detecting an approaching rainstorm up to 150 miles off.

While this may seem like an impractical talent, researchers say elephants' weather-predicting could help human conservationists save the animals from poachers.

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October 15 2014

What humans can learn about kindness - from vampire bats


The world would be a much happier place if humans were more like vampire bats. It’s their unselfishness I’m talking about: the free giving of something you need but are prepared to surrender to another.

We humans like to think that altruism in any form is uniquely human: a real and above all moral division between us and the rest of the animal kingdom. Vampire bats contradict this view.

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October 15 2014

How the fruit fly could help us sniff out drugs and bombs


A fly's sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs, new University of Sussex research has found.

Brain scientist Professor Thomas Nowotny was surprised to find that the 'nose' of fruit flies can identify odours from illicit drugs and explosive substances almost as accurately as wine odour, which the insects are naturally attracted to because it smells like their favourite food, fermenting fruit.

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October 15 2014

Lovely grub—are insects the future of food?


Officials at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) became interested in the role of insects in food security about a decade ago, after documenting the significant part that insects play in Central African diets. Since then, the FAO has been commissioning studies, issuing reports, and arranging small meetings on eating insects. The gathering in Ede, jointly organized by the FAO and Wageningen University and Research Center, is the culmination of all these efforts—the first major international conference to bring together entomologists, entrepreneurs, nutritionists, chefs, psychologists, and government officials. They are here to discuss how to expand the use of insects as food and feed, particularly in the Western world.

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