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April 23 2015

Egyptologists Unearth Tomb of Long Lost Pharaoh so Ancient Only His Name is Known


Many people think of ancient Egyptian dynasties as fairly well-documented, but there were many kings whose lives and deeds are lost in the dust of time. One was King KhaBa of the Old Kingdom’s Third Dynasty of 2650 to 2575 BC.

As with so many kings, KhaBa’s name, which means ‘The Soul Appears’ or ‘Radiant Soul’, is recorded but very little else is known about him.


Related: In the epic rivalry between ancient Egypt and Nubia, one god had enduring appeal

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April 23 2015

Old Kingdom mastaba found in the Delta


A team of archaeologists under the auspices of the Egypt Exploration Society, led by Dr Joanne Rowland (Free University of Berlin), has located an Old Kingdom mastaba at Quesna.

Dr Mamdouh El Damaty, Minister of Antiquities, said, "It is the first time to discover an Old Kingdom tomb in Quesna which is known for Roman period antiquities.”.


Related: Ruins of Egypt’s most ancient capital of Memphis unearthed

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April 23 2015

Americans with illegal Iraq War souvenirs go unprosecuted


As the elected Iraqi government seeks diplomatic respect and struggles to save its ancient sites from the rampages of the Islamic State group, American military members, contractors and others caught with culturally significant artifacts they brought home from the war there are going largely unprosecuted.

Years after the war, swords, artifacts and other items looted from Saddam Hussein's palaces are still turning up for sale online and at auctions, and in some cases U.S. agents have traced them to American government employees, who took them as souvenirs or war trophies.

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April 23 2015

Aboriginal Australian Art Tells the Most Important Ancient Stories


In 1770, a ship called The Endeavour made land in a lovely cove not yet called Botany Bay, observed by Gweagal men. Spears were waved on one side; shots fired on the other. An Aboriginal man was wounded. When the arrivals picked up the fleeing men’s belongings, they found not weapons but fishing equipment. And so began the history of white Australia, soon to be spattered with such tragic communication failures like bloodstains on a beach.

Some of the artefacts retrieved by the first explorers found their way to the British Museum.

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April 23 2015

How Inuit women were wearing fur thongs 130 years ago


During the 19th century Inuits in Greenland would have entertained polite company in their settlements while wearing a thong made of seal fur.

Traditionally known as a 'naatsit', the underwear is adorned with beads and would have been sewn together by a woman using strips of seal pelt.

It is currently on display at the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen as part of its animal-skin clothing collection.

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April 23 2015

Study finds ancient clam beaches not so natural


In their second study to be published in just over a year, an SFU led team of scientists has discovered that ancient coastal Indigenous people were more than hunter-gatherers.

Lepofsky's research team has discovered that Northwest Coast Indigenous people didn't make their living just by gathering the natural ocean's bounty. Rather, from Alaska to Washington, they were farmers who cultivated productive clam gardens to ensure abundant and sustainable clam harvests.

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April 23 2015

Neanderthal who fell down sinkhole 150,000 years ago starved to death and fused with its walls


It was a gruesome death that is the stuff of most people's nightmares.

Now scientists have identified the unfortunate individual whose bones were found fused to the walls of a cave in Lamalunga, near Altamura, in southern Italy.

Using analysis of DNA extracted from the bones sticking out from the limestone rock, researchers have found he was a Neanderthal who fell down a sinkhole around 150,000 years ago.

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April 22 2015

Did Neanderthals Die Off Because They Couldn't Harness Fire?


Neanderthals may have died off because they failed to harness the power of fire to the extent their human cousins did, a new data analysis suggests.

Using fire for cooking would have allowed these other groups of ancient human relatives to get more calories from the same amount of food, thereby edging out the Neanderthal population. Over time, the anatomically modern human population would have risen, while the Neanderthal population plummeted toward extinction, according to the model.

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April 22 2015

Ancient Hangover Cure Discovered in Greek Texts


Hiding a hangover in ancient Egypt would've taken some work. Rather than popping an ibuprofen for a pounding drunken headache, people in Egypt may have worn a leafy necklace.

That's according to a newly translated and published papyrus written in Greek with the recipe for a "drunken headache" cure. The alcohol victim would have strung together leaves from a shrub called Alexandrian chamaedaphne (Ruscus racemosus L.), possibly wearing the strand around the neck, the text revealed.

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April 22 2015

170-Year-Old Champagne Recovered (and Tasted) From a Baltic Shipwreck


The term “vintage” may now have a whole new meaning for wine lovers—a treasure trove of 170-year-old champagne has been unearthed from the bottom of the sea. In 2010, a group of divers in the Baltic Sea happened upon the remains of a sunken trade schooner just off the coast of Finland.


Related: Coast Guard Aircraft Spots 100-Year-Old Shipwrecks

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April 22 2015

Japan plans moon mission in three years


Japan has announced that it is getting ready to launch its first unmanned mission to the Moon in 2018, which would make it the fourth nation to land on Earth’s satellite and help pave the way for manned missions in the future.

The news was revealed by the country`s Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to a council of the cabinet office and the ministry of education, culture, sports science and technology on Monday, but further details are only expected to appear later in summer.

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April 22 2015

Why do measurements of the gravitational constant vary so much?


Newton's gravitational constant, G, has been measured about a dozen times over the last 40 years, but the results have varied by much more than would be expected due to random and systematic errors. Now scientists have found that the measured G values oscillate over time like a sine wave with a period of 5.9 years. It's not G itself that is varying by this much, they propose, but more likely something else is affecting the measurements.

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April 22 2015

Iron-rich rocks could could hold signs of life


A robotic mission's search for life on Mars may seem worlds away from human scientists wandering around hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. But a study of the Yellowstone hot springs has revealed new clues about how organic materials might get preserved in similar environments on the Red Planet, bettering our chances of finding possible signs of life.

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April 22 2015

Cosmic rays misbehave in space station experiment


A new census of charged particles buzzing through space includes a puzzling feature that challenges predictions about how these particles originate. The results, presented April 15 at a conference in Geneva, may force scientists to rethink theories that focus on supernovas as the producers of these speedy particles.

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April 22 2015

Biggest structure in the universe is huge hole, scientists find


Scientists have found what could be the biggest thing in the universe, and it is a huge cold hole that could fundamentally change our understanding of the universe.

A giant “supervoid”, 1.8-billion light years wide, could explain a large cold spot in the universe that has been unexplained for more than a decade, scientists say.


Alt: Cold cosmic mystery solved: Largest known structure in the universe leaves its imprint on CMB radiation

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April 22 2015

Pulsing light may indicate supermassive black hole merger


As two galaxies enter the final stages of merging, scientists have theorized that the galaxies' supermassive black holes will form a "binary," or two black holes in such close orbit they are gravitationally bound to one another. In a new study, astronomers at the University of Maryland present direct evidence of a pulsing quasar, which may substantiate the existence of black hole binaries.

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April 22 2015

Color differences could recalibrate cosmic acceleration rate


The expansion of the universe might not be accelerating quite as fast as researchers thought. Type 1a supernovas, exploding stars used as yardsticks to measure distances to other galaxies, come in two flavors, new research indicates. That complication could lead to overestimates of how remote the most far-flung supernovas are.

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