News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  next  >>>

 

September 13 2014

'Boris' the robot can load up dishwasher


A robot unveiled today at the British Science Festival will be loading dishwashers next year, its developers claim.

"Boris" is one of the first robots in the world capable of intelligently manipulating unfamiliar objects with a humanlike grasp.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Electronics that need very little energy?


A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to minus 228 degrees Celsius without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Video game teaches kids how to code


Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego have successfully funded on Kickstarter a new and improved version of CodeSpells, a first-person player game they developed that teaches players how to code.

The game's previous iteration, developed by UC San Diego computer science Ph.D. students Sarah Esper and Stephen Foster, has been in use in dozens of schools throughout the world for more than a year.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Millennials Are Reading More Books Than You Think They Are


A new survey has peered into our bookshelves, and it's revealing some good news about the reading habits of young Americans.

Pew undertook a sweeping survey of the reading habits of millennials compared to older generations, and publishers should be pleased. 43% of all people under the age of 30 read a book almost every day, with that number increasing to just under 70% if you increase the timespan to once a week, the highest percentage of any age group to do so.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Publishers Gave Away 122,951,031 Books During World War II


In 1943, in the middle of the Second World War, America's book publishers took an audacious gamble. They decided to sell the armed forces cheap paperbacks, shipped to units scattered around the globe. Instead of printing only the books soldiers and sailors actually wanted to read, though, publishers decided to send them the best they had to offer. Over the next four years, publishers gave away 122,951,031 copies of their most valuable titles.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Religion Doesn't Make People More Moral, Study Finds


The moral high ground seems to be a crowded place. A new study suggests that religious people aren't more likely to do good than their nonreligious counterparts. And while they may vehemently disagree with one another at times, liberals and conservatives also tend to be on par when it comes to behaving morally.

Researchers asked 1,252 adults of different religious and political backgrounds in the United States and Canada to record the good and bad deeds they committed, witnessed, learned about or were the target of throughout the day.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Magic Mushrooms Help Smokers Kick Habit in Small Study


Just two or three experiences with the hallucinogenic drug known as magic mushrooms helped a dozen long-term smokers quit, succeeding in a study where numerous other approaches failed.


Related: Why Psychedelics Are So Important To Veterans

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Meditation may mitigate migraine misery


Meditation might be a path to migraine relief, according to a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

"Stress is a well-known trigger for headaches and research supports the general benefits of mind/body interventions for migraines, but there hasn't been much research to evaluate specific standardized meditation interventions," said Rebecca Erwin Wells, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at Wake Forest Baptist and lead author of the study published in the online edition of the journal Headache.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Woman of 24 found to have no cerebellum in her brain


DON'T mind the gap. A woman has reached the age of 24 without anyone realising she was missing a large part of her brain. The case highlights just how adaptable the organ is.

The discovery was made when the woman was admitted to the Chinese PLA General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command in Shandong Province complaining of dizziness and nausea. She told doctors she'd had problems walking steadily for most of her life, and her mother reported that she hadn't walked until she was 7 and that her speech only became intelligible at the age of 6.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 13 2014

Can your blood type affect your memory in later years?


People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study. AB is the least common blood type, found in about 4 percent of the U.S. population. The study found that people with AB blood were 82 percent more likely to develop the thinking and memory problems that can lead to dementia than people with other blood types.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

Brain 'can classify words during sleep'


The brain is still active while we are asleep, say scientists, who found people were able to classify words during their slumber.

Researchers from Cambridge and Paris introduced participants to a word test while awake and found they continued to respond correctly while asleep.


Related: Some Things You Can Do In Your Sleep, Literally

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

The Mysterious Celestial Spheres of the Ancient Mughal Empire


Before the advent of Google Earth, when one wanted to see what the planet looked like, or to find a certain faraway place without actually travelling to it, one would consult a map - and youíll recall that they didnít always fit in your phone. Weíve made maps for millennia. Itís an art form unto itself, and as anyone with a love for antique maps can tell you, the variation in form and artistic style is both immense and awe inspiring.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

Hereís How to Explore the Pyramids From Your Own Home


On Tuesday morning, Google unveiled Street View Egypt in Google Maps, the latest step in the tech giantís quest to image and map the seven wonders of the world. This new collection includes 360-degree views of the Great Pyramids of Giza, the necropolis of Saqqara, the Citadel of Qaitbay, the Cairo Citadel, the Hanging Church and the ancient city of Abu Mena.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

Groundwater tied to human evolution


Our ancient ancestors' ability to move around and find new sources of groundwater during extremely dry periods in Africa millions of years ago may have been key to their survival and the evolution of the human species, a new study shows.

While water in rivers and lakes would have disappeared as the climate changed due to variations in Earth's orbit, freshwater springs fed by groundwater could have stayed active for up to 1000 years without rainfall.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

Ancient 'Dragon' Beast Flew Right Out of 'Avatar'


A sprawling ancient flying reptile looked so much like a dragon that could have flown alongside the aerial predators called "ikran" in the film "Avatar" that its discoverers named the newfound beast after these mountain banshees.

The pterosaur, now called Ikrandraco avatar ("draco" means "dragon" in Latin), may have stored food in a throat pouch like a pelican does, the researchers said.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

Giant Spinosaurus Was Bigger Than T. RexóAnd First Dinosaur Known to Swim


The biggest and the baddest among meat-eating dinosaurs, Spinosaurus may have also been the first dinosaur to take to the water, swimming in North Africa's rivers some 97 million years ago, researchers reported on Thursday.

Floating like a crocodile to stalk prey, the 50-foot-long (15.2 meters) predator bore a massive sail on its back that would have risen from the water like a shark's fin.


Related: Spinosaurus fossil: 'Giant swimming dinosaur' unearthed

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 12 2014

Could this be an image of the Loch Ness monster?


A photographer has captured an image of what she believes to be a creature from the deep.

Ellie Williams took the shots while taking pictures in the Lake District of Windermere, which is located 241km from Scotlandís Loch Ness area.

Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoological Loch Ness Monster, also known affectionately as "Nessie".

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default