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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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August 16 2014

Why the Public Library Beats Amazon—for Now


A growing stack of companies would like you to pay a monthly fee to read e-books, just like you subscribe to Netflix to binge on movies and TV shows. Don't bother. Go sign up for a public library card instead.

Really, the public library? Amazon.com recently launched Kindle Unlimited, a $10-per-month service offering loans of 600,000 e-books. Startups called Oyster and Scribd offer something similar. It isn't very often that a musty old institution can hold its own against tech disrupters.

But it turns out librarians haven't just been sitting around shushing people while the Internet drove them into irrelevance.

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August 16 2014

In the Brain, Memories Are Inextricably Tied to Place


It’s no coincidence that, when recalling a tragedy, we ask where someone was: “Where were you when President Kennedy was shot?”

Psychologists hypothesize that we lock in that memory by linking it to a where, that integrating many stimuli together helps us remember something particularly important. They call this process episodic memory formation: the locking of ideas and objects to a single place and time, to forming associations between different stimuli.

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August 16 2014

Why Are So Few People Left-Handed?


Today marks the 22nd annual International Left-Handers Day. To celebrate, let's look at why only around one in ten people is left-handed. Why, pray tell, are lefties are so rare – or, said another way, why are most of us righties? It seems like a simple question, but it's actually one of the biggest mysteries in all of science.

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August 16 2014

Pill could stop middle-aged spread before it starts


Middle age is when your age starts to show around your middle, Bob Hope, the comedian, quipped.

But now scientists have discovered what causes the middle-aged spread, and more importantly, how to turn it off.

Researchers at the University of Aberdeen found that signals in the brain, which tell us to stop eating when full, become less efficient as we age.

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August 16 2014

Still 'Drinkable': 200-Year-Old Booze Found in Shipwreck


A 200-year-old stoneware seltzer bottle that was recently recovered from a shipwreck at the bottom of the Baltic Sea contains alcohol, according to the results of a preliminary analysis.

Researchers discovered the well-preserved and sealed bottle in June, while exploring the so-called F53.31 shipwreck in Gda&#324;sk Bay, close to the Polish coast. Preliminary laboratory tests have now shown the bottle contains a 14-percent alcohol distillate, which may be vodka or a type of gin called jenever, most likely diluted with water.

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August 16 2014

Ancient Maya Cities Found in Jungle


A monster mouth doorway, ruined pyramid temples and palace remains emerged from the Mexican jungle as archaeologists unearthed two ancient Mayan cities.

Found in the southeastern part of the Mexican state of Campeche, in the heart of the Yucatan peninsula, the cities were hidden in thick vegetation and hardly accessible.


Photos here

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August 16 2014

Visions of the Past - How Far Should We Go in 'Restoring' Ancient Monuments?


To most of us in the 21st century, the architectural ruins of the past possess somewhat of a magical aura. While the humans who built them have long since turned to dust, the buildings they left behind act as a portal through which we might better understand our long-dead ancestors - or, alternatively, allow us to mistakenly overlay our own beliefs upon them.

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August 16 2014

6th-century tumulus built like step pyramid first of its kind in Japan


ASUKA, Nara Prefecture--Researchers determined that an ancient burial mound here is shaped like a step pyramid, the first such discovery in Japan.

The Miyakozuka Tomb is believed to date from the latter half of the sixth century. The square-shaped tumulus is built of stones in stepped levels like stairs.

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August 16 2014

How Despots Arose With Agriculture


For hundreds of thousands of years humans lived in hunter-gatherer societies, eating wild plants and animals. Inequality in these groups is thought to have been very low, with evidence suggesting food and other resources were shared equally between all individuals. In fact, in the hunter-gatherer societies that still exist today we see that all individuals have a say in group decision making. Although some individuals may act as leaders in the sense of guiding discussions, they cannot force others to follow them.

But it seems that with the beginning of agriculture around 10,000 years ago, this changed.

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August 15 2014

Was Neanderthal shot by a time traveller?


ONE day in 1922, near Broken Hill, Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), a skull was found. When it came to the attention of the British Museum, the curators were pleased.

It was, in fact, a Neanderthal skull, and Neanderthal bones did not exactly come ten-a-penny.

But the Broken Hill skull was special for other reasons. On the left side of the cranium was a small, perfectly round hole. At first it was assumed that it had been made by a spear, or other sharp implement, but further investigation proved that this had not been the case.

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August 15 2014

Why You Don't Look Like a Caveman


Humans today may have developed softer, more feminine faces as society became friendlier and less aggressive centuries ago, a new study suggests.

As humans began to form cooperative communities, craft tools and work together, their aggression levels began to decrease, resulting in less of a need for the robust facial features of a caveman. The result? Thinner skulls, lighter brows and rounder heads, the researchers said. Such changes can be traced to testosterone levels acting on the human skeleton, they added.

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August 15 2014

North Kent's answer to Stonehenge discovered by Faversham archaeologists


REMAINS of a prehistoric monument similar to Stonehenge are being excavated by Faversham experts.

SWAT Archaeology made the discovery while making a preparatory dig ahead of a planned housing development at Iwade Meadows, in Sittingbourne.


Related: Kent's 'Stonehenge' discovered: 'Sacred' path that leads to a Neolithic circular ditch discovered in Sittingbourne

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August 15 2014

Archaeologists shocked to find 5,000-year-old battlefield in prehistoric Cardiff


A six-year-old's discovery of a flint tool in a Neolithic ditch was the first of a "significant number" of thrilling finds at a Cardiff hill fort

Archaeologists hoping to discover Roman and Iron Age finds at a Welsh hillfort were shocked to unearth pottery and arrowheads predating their predicted finds by 4,000 years at the home of a powerful Iron Age community, including flint tools and weapons from 3,600 BC.

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August 15 2014

Collapse of Civilizations Seen Through Key Beer Ingredient: Study


Beer, scientists have long argued, helped give rise to civilization in an arc of land that sweeps from modern-day Egypt to the border between Iraq and Iran. Today, chemical analysis of barley grains, one of beer's key ingredients, is bolstering research into climate change’s role in the collapse of ancient societies.

"There has been a longtime debate about the relationship between climate and its changes and the development and in some cases demise of cultures," Frank Hole, an emeritus professor of anthropology at Yale University in New Haven.

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August 15 2014

Plants may use newly discovered language to communicate


A Virginia Tech scientist has discovered a potentially new form of plant communication, one that allows them to share an extraordinary amount of genetic information with one another.

The finding by Jim Westwood, a professor of plant pathology, physiology, and weed science in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, throws open the door to a new arena of science that explores how plants communicate with each other on a molecular level. It also gives scientists new insight into ways to fight parasitic weeds that wreak havoc on food crops in some of the poorest parts of the world.

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August 15 2014

Toxic Bacteria Devours Tumors With Precision


A bacterium found in soil that can cause flesh-ravaging infections in its natural state has been converted — with a few genetic tweaks — into a precise tumor assassin.

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center excised the toxin-producing gene from the bacterium Clostridium novyi, which, in its natural form, can be fatal when introduced to the bloodstream. They injected spores of the modified bacteria directly into tumors of mice, dogs and ultimately a human patient.

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August 15 2014

Bee, scorpion and snake venom may hold cancer cure


It's ancient medicine with a sci-fi-sounding twist.

A scientist at the University of Illinois, Dipanjan Pan, and his team say they may have found a way to stop cancer cell growth, according to a paper presented at the American Chemical Society conference this week.

The work is in very early stages, but has shown success in stopping breast cancer and melanoma cell growth in lab tests. Pan's technique uses nanotechnology to deliver a synthesized element similar to the venom found in bees, snakes and scorpions.

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