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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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March 21 2015

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function


Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques - structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

If a person has Alzheimer’s disease, it’s usually the result of a build-up of two types of lesions - amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles.


Related: No room to think: Depressive thoughts may have a negative effect on working memory

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March 21 2015

What A Man's Hands Say About His Risk For Schizophrenia


Could a simple finger test screen for schizophrenia?

Maybe so, at least in men. New research suggests that the ratio of the length of a guy's index finger to his ring finger may predict his risk for the devastating mental disorder.


Related: Children with symmetrical hands 'are smarter'

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March 21 2015

You are when you eat: Limiting flies to specific eating hours protects their hearts against aging


Limiting flies to specific eating hours protected their hearts against aging, a study has demonstrated. Previous research has found that people who tend to eat later in the day and into the night have a higher chance of developing heart disease than people who cut off their food consumption earlier. "So what's happening when people eat late?" asked a biologist whose research focuses on cardiovascular physiology. "They're not changing their diet, just the time.".

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March 21 2015

Omega-3 fatty acids help improve boys' attention spans, research shows


In boys with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, new research has found that an extra daily dose of Omega-3 fatty acids reduced symptoms of inattention.

The study found that in a small clinical trial involving boys 8 to 14 years old, parents rated their son's ability to pay attention more highly if the child's diet was supplemented for 16 weeks with the long-chain fatty acid than if he got a placebo instead.

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March 20 2015

DEA approves study using MDMA for anxiety in seriously ill patients


The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has approved the first clinical trial using MDMA along with psychotherapy to treat anxiety among people with life-threatening illnesses, researchers told Al Jazeera on Tuesday, adding that public support for the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs is rapidly growing.

Unlike Ecstasy or Molly — names for MDMA sold on the street and often mixed with dangerous adulterants — pure MDMA has been proved “sufficiently safe” when taken a limited number of times in moderate doses, MAPS says on its website.

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March 20 2015

Healthy songs: the amazing power of music therapy


Music therapy has grown from relative obscurity to a practice that is becoming fairly mainstream, largely due to the advocacy of colleagues in the field, along with media coverage of the burgeoning profession. Jodi Picoult came to Berklee College to study music therapy to develop the main character – a music therapist – of her novel Sing You Home. Meanwhile, following the gunshot injury she sustained, Representative Gabby Giffords underwent rehabilitation efforts that included music-based interventions.

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March 20 2015

Interpersonal trust erodes over time in the online world, experts say


When people interact in an Internet community, they experience higher levels of trust initially. But as time passes and more information comes to light about other users, they are more wary, according to new Stanford research.

Technology reduces overall uncertainty and promotes trust between strangers. But at the same time, it erodes some of the serendipity involved in meeting new people.


Related: Trust increases with age; benefits well-being

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March 20 2015

Broken Hearts Can Be A Matter Of Life And Death: The Real Dangers Of Heartbreak


The proverbial broken heart threatens anyone brave enough to put his love and trust into someone else’s hands. It’s that emotional phenomenon your mother warned you about during infamous teen angst years. But what happens when a broken heart is more than just a flood of feelings and actually enters into a physical, sometimes life-threatening state?

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March 20 2015

Beliefs Can Trigger Asthma Attacks


Asthma attacks can be scary and painful—yet some of them may be avoidable if asthma sufferers can alter their expectations. Evidence is mounting that believing an odor or activity will trigger an asthma attack is sometimes all it takes to induce real physical symptoms.

In one recent study, 17 patients with moderate, persistent asthma took whiffs of a nonirritating odorant.

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March 20 2015

Speaking a second language may change how you see the world


Where did the thief go? You might get a more accurate answer if you ask the question in German. How did she get away? Now you might want to switch to English. Speakers of the two languages put different emphasis on actions and their consequences, influencing the way they think about the world, according to a new study. The work also finds that bilinguals may get the best of both worldviews, as their thinking can be more flexible.

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March 20 2015

Tongues may have evolved from a mouthful of water


Lolloping on their pectoral fins to forage for food over ground, mudskippers have adapted to life in and out of water. Now, slow-motion X-ray video shows how these amphibious fish use a mouthful of water like a tongue to capture and swallow food on land – a finding that may offer a glimpse into how fleshy-tongued terrestrial tetrapods evolved from fish 400-350 million years ago.


Alt: Fish Uses "Water Tongue" to Grab Prey on Land

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March 20 2015

Spiders Weave Their Webs Based on Dietary Needs


Spiders can customise their webs to make sure they get the diet they need, new research suggests.

In response to their diet, they optimise the size, strength and stickiness of their webs for catching whatever prey is around, say researchers today in the Royal Society journal Open Science.


Related: 'Sparklemuffin' and 'Skeletorus' spider species discovered by university graduate student

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March 20 2015

Mystery of Darwin's 'strange animals' solved


When Charles Darwin visited South America on HMS Beagle in the 1830s, he discovered fossils of several hefty mammals that defied classification, such as Macrauchenia, which looked like a humpless camel with a long snout; or Toxodon, with a rhino’s body, hippo’s head and rodent-like teeth — which he described as “perhaps one of the strangest animals ever discovered”.

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March 20 2015

Beetles beat out extinction


Today's rich variety of beetles may be due to an historically low extinction rate rather than a high rate of new species emerging, according to a new study. These findings were revealed by combing through the fossil record.

"Much of the work to understand why beetles are diverse has really focused on what promotes speciation,".

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March 20 2015

Crocodile ancestor was top predator before dinosaurs roamed North America


A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. Carnufex carolinensis, or the "Carolina Butcher," was a 9-foot long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

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March 20 2015

How an ancient whale skull could point to humanity's birthplace


A 17-million-year-old beaked whale fossil is helping researchers solve a puzzle about the likely birthplace of humanity in East Africa, a new study finds.

The whale (Ziphiidae) lived when the East African plateau was substantially lower and covered by dense forests, the researchers said.


Related: First dolphins appeared millions of years earlier than previously thought

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March 20 2015

Study raises concerns over big, rapidly thinning Antarctic glacier


Scientists have raised concerns about a large, rapidly thinning glacier in Antarctica, warning it could contribute significantly to rising sea levels.

They say they've discovered two openings that could channel warm seawater to the base of the huge Totten Glacier and bring the threat of potentially disastrous melting.

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News desk archive...

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