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April 22 2015

Ancient Hangover Cure Discovered in Greek Texts


Hiding a hangover in ancient Egypt would've taken some work. Rather than popping an ibuprofen for a pounding drunken headache, people in Egypt may have worn a leafy necklace.

That's according to a newly translated and published papyrus written in Greek with the recipe for a "drunken headache" cure. The alcohol victim would have strung together leaves from a shrub called Alexandrian chamaedaphne (Ruscus racemosus L.), possibly wearing the strand around the neck, the text revealed.

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April 22 2015

170-Year-Old Champagne Recovered (and Tasted) From a Baltic Shipwreck


The term “vintage” may now have a whole new meaning for wine lovers—a treasure trove of 170-year-old champagne has been unearthed from the bottom of the sea. In 2010, a group of divers in the Baltic Sea happened upon the remains of a sunken trade schooner just off the coast of Finland.


Related: Coast Guard Aircraft Spots 100-Year-Old Shipwrecks

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April 22 2015

Japan plans moon mission in three years


Japan has announced that it is getting ready to launch its first unmanned mission to the Moon in 2018, which would make it the fourth nation to land on Earth’s satellite and help pave the way for manned missions in the future.

The news was revealed by the country`s Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to a council of the cabinet office and the ministry of education, culture, sports science and technology on Monday, but further details are only expected to appear later in summer.

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April 22 2015

Why do measurements of the gravitational constant vary so much?


Newton's gravitational constant, G, has been measured about a dozen times over the last 40 years, but the results have varied by much more than would be expected due to random and systematic errors. Now scientists have found that the measured G values oscillate over time like a sine wave with a period of 5.9 years. It's not G itself that is varying by this much, they propose, but more likely something else is affecting the measurements.

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April 22 2015

Iron-rich rocks could could hold signs of life


A robotic mission's search for life on Mars may seem worlds away from human scientists wandering around hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. But a study of the Yellowstone hot springs has revealed new clues about how organic materials might get preserved in similar environments on the Red Planet, bettering our chances of finding possible signs of life.

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April 22 2015

Cosmic rays misbehave in space station experiment


A new census of charged particles buzzing through space includes a puzzling feature that challenges predictions about how these particles originate. The results, presented April 15 at a conference in Geneva, may force scientists to rethink theories that focus on supernovas as the producers of these speedy particles.

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April 22 2015

Biggest structure in the universe is huge hole, scientists find


Scientists have found what could be the biggest thing in the universe, and it is a huge cold hole that could fundamentally change our understanding of the universe.

A giant “supervoid”, 1.8-billion light years wide, could explain a large cold spot in the universe that has been unexplained for more than a decade, scientists say.


Alt: Cold cosmic mystery solved: Largest known structure in the universe leaves its imprint on CMB radiation

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April 22 2015

Pulsing light may indicate supermassive black hole merger


As two galaxies enter the final stages of merging, scientists have theorized that the galaxies' supermassive black holes will form a "binary," or two black holes in such close orbit they are gravitationally bound to one another. In a new study, astronomers at the University of Maryland present direct evidence of a pulsing quasar, which may substantiate the existence of black hole binaries.

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April 22 2015

Color differences could recalibrate cosmic acceleration rate


The expansion of the universe might not be accelerating quite as fast as researchers thought. Type 1a supernovas, exploding stars used as yardsticks to measure distances to other galaxies, come in two flavors, new research indicates. That complication could lead to overestimates of how remote the most far-flung supernovas are.

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April 22 2015

Stars throw out a lifetime's waste carbon in just 1000 years


When cosmic carbon leaves home, it may move in a real rush, according to the first sighting of a star spewing it into space.

Ageing stars build elements like carbon in their core. These are eventually shed when stars throw off their surface layers. It's a crucial process for seeding the universe with carbon and oxygen, which are important for life. "All of organic chemistry and life depends on these elements,".

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April 22 2015

Japan's Magnetic Levitation Passenger Train Just Broke The World Speed Record


A Japanese maglev that is the fastest passenger train in the world has broken its own speed record.

Operator JR Central said the train reached 603 kilometers per hour (375 miles per hour) in a test run on Tuesday, surpassing its previous record of 361 mph (581 kph) set in 2003. The train traveled for just over a mile (1.8 kilometers) at a speed exceeding 600 kph (373 mph).

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April 22 2015

Record breaking clock invented which only loses a second in 15bn years


Physicists have said they have fine-tuned an atomic clock to the point where it won’t lose or gain a second in 15bn years – longer than the universe has existed.

The “optical lattice” clock, which uses strontium atoms, is now three times more accurate than a year ago when it set the previous world record, its developers reported in the journal Nature Communications.

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April 22 2015

The power of deadlines


People like procrastinating. Or at least, they keep doing it despite their protestations. It’s very common to see Facebook posts or tweets where someone reveals that they shouldn’t be on Facebook or Twitter because they have important work to do, but are procrastinating. So people procrastinate by going online and pointing out they’re procrastinating. That’s some advanced-level time-wasting there.

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April 22 2015

Big ears don’t necessarily come with baggage


In a small study, onlookers judged big-eared faces as intelligent, likable

Prominent ears draw the eyes, and that might not be a bad thing. In a new study, adults spent more time looking at children’s protruding ears than at unexceptional auricles, and the adults didn’t judge the children’s personalities negatively.

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April 22 2015

Want to feel happier? Just smell a happy person’s BO!


Smelling someone’s stinky body odor can really bum you out, at least temporarily. But did you know that BO can communicate emotions directly? According to this study, human body odor may contain chemicals, also known as “chemosignals”, that can carry information about emotional states. To test this hypothesis, the researchers evoked emotions in 12 men by showing them movie clips to make them either happy.

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April 21 2015

Mindfulness 'as good as medication' for chronic depression


Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) may be just as effective as antidepressants in helping prevent people with chronic depression from relapsing, say UK scientists.

Depression is one of the most common forms of mental illness, affecting more than 350 million people worldwide. It is ranked by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of disability globally.

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April 21 2015

How rare you like your steak could be linked to your dementia risk


Do you like your steak rare or well done? The answer could influence how mentally sharp you stay as you age, new research suggests. Scientists have found that compounds known as glycotoxins, which form as we brown (or blacken) certain foods, may increase the risk of age-related dementia.


Related: Cost of lab-grown burger patty drops from $325,000 to $11.36

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