Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:   prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  next  >>>

 

July 1 2015

Why You Should Thank A Caterpillar For Your Mustard And Wasabi


The next time you dab wasabi on your sushi or spread mustard on your hot dog, take a moment to thank a caterpillar. It may sound unlikely, but the critters play a critical role in creating the sharp, pungent flavors that give those condiments a savory kick.

Turns out, the flavors of these condiments are the result of millions of years of plants and caterpillars duking it out to survive.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

To Stop Mosquito Bites, Silence Your Skin's Bacteria


Evening picnics in a park, sunset beers by a lake and warm nights with the windows open are just some of the delights of midsummer. But as dusk falls, one of the most infuriating creatures on the planet stirs: the mosquito. Outdoor activities are abandoned in an ankle-scratching frenzy and sleep is disturbed as we haplessly swat at the whining source of our torment.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Eye color may be linked to alcohol dependence


People with blue eyes might have a greater chance of becoming alcoholics, according to a unique new study by genetic researchers at the University of Vermont.

The work, led by Arvis Sulovari, a doctoral student in cellular, molecular and biological sciences, and Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Dawei Li, Ph.D., is the first to make a direct connection between a person's eye color and alcohol dependence.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Why meditation should be taught in schools


New research in the fields of psychology, education and neuroscience shows teaching meditation in schools is having positive effects on students' well-being, social skills and academic skills.

A recent meta-review of the impact of meditation in schools combined the results from 15 studies and almost 1800 students from Australia, Canada, India, the UK, the US and Taiwan. The research showed meditation is beneficial in most cases and led to three broad outcomes for students: higher well-being, better social skills and greater academic skills.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Giving children antibiotics 'may cause obesity and diabetes'


A study in mice suggests that antiobiotics could harm children's gut bacteria leaving them prone to obesity and diabetes

Giving children common antibiotics may cause obesity by altering bacteria in their gut, according to new research.


Alt: Repeated courses of antibiotics may profoundly alter children's development

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Swarms of tiny robots are joining forces to break through blocked arteries


Swarms of microscopic, magnetic, robotic beads could be scrubbing in next to the world’s top vascular surgeons—all taking aim at blocked arteries. These microrobots, which look and move like corkscrew-shaped bacteria, are being developed by mechanical engineers at Drexel University as a part of a surgical toolkit being assembled by the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in South Korea.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

New nanogenerator harvests power from rolling tires


A group of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers and a collaborator from China have developed a nanogenerator that harvests energy from a car's rolling tire friction.

An innovative method of reusing energy, the nanogenerator ultimately could provide automobile manufacturers a new way to squeeze greater efficiency out of their vehicles.

The researchers reported their development, which is the first of its kind, in a paper published May 6, 2015, in the journal Nano Energy.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

The science of sustainability: what we've learned from artificial photosynthesis and synthetic meat


Most sustainability efforts focus on fixing problems. Whether the solution involves installing air filtration systems on cruise ships, lobbying for safer meat production or restricting microbead usage, it usually comes after a problem has become a crisis.

But what if we could head off the problem at the beginning of the process, instead of at the end? What if, instead of trying to reduce the emissions from fossil fuels, we could skip the fossil fuels entirely? What if, instead of dealing with the environmental and health problems created by meat production, we could take cattle out of the process?

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Scientists around the world wish you a Happy Asteroid Day


Human beings aren’t the greatest at calculating risk. We fear flying more than driving despite the fact that driving is far more likely to kill you. We obsess over tiny 99-cent purchases in the App Store, but think little of paying $8-$12 for fast food. And when it comes to huge-but-inevitable disasters, like Carrington Event-level solar flares and giant rocks that fall from the sky, we’re not very good at paying attention to the risk, even when we know, intellectually, that such events are going to happen in the long run.

A group of astronauts, scientists, and researchers around the world have declared June 30 to be Asteroid Day in the hopes of changing public perception of the risk and the need for long-term asteroid detection and monitoring.


Alt: Scientists worldwide mark first annual Asteroid Day with stark warnings
Alt: On Asteroid Day, raising awareness that Earth could get hit again

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Researchers calculate amount of undiscovered meteorite impact sites on Earth’s surface


The geologists Prof. Dr. Stefan Hergarten and Prof. Dr. Thomas Kenkmann from the Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Freiburg have published the world’s first study on the question of how many meteorite craters there should be on the Earth’s surface.

A total of 188 have been confirmed so far, and 340 are still awaiting discovery according to the results of a probability calculation presented by the two researchers in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

Infrared lifts the veil on a golden city


This beautiful golden jewel of tightly packed stars near the centre of our galaxy is normally hidden by dust.

But powerful technology has enabled astronomers to penetrate the dense fog surrounding Liller 1 to reveal an unprecedented ultra-sharp view of this vast stellar city.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 1 2015

This boomerang-like aircraft could be the first to fly on Mars


With its various rover missions, NASA has been actively exploring the red surface of Mars since the '90s — but now the space agency wants to investigate the Martian skies. NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center is testing out a prototype of a flying wing aircraft called Prandtl-m, which could be the first man-made vehicle to fly on Mars. And it looks a lot like a large titanium boomerang.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 30 2015

Even stars older than 11 billion years have Earth-like planets


A new study of 33 Kepler stars with solar-like oscillations to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The 33 Kepler stars have been selected for their solar like oscillations and a set of basic parameters have been determined with high precision showing that stars even older than 11 billion years have Earth-like planets.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 30 2015

Falling into a black hole may convert you into a hologram


In the movie Interstellar, the main character Cooper escapes from a black hole in time to see his daughter Murph in her final days. Some have argued that the movie is so scientific that it should be taught in schools. In reality, many scientists believe that anything sent into a black hole would probably be destroyed. But a new study suggests that this might not be the case after all.

The research says that, rather than being devoured, a person falling into a black hole would actually be absorbed into a hologram—without even noticing.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 30 2015

Some physicists believe we're living in a giant hologram — and it's not that far-fetched


Some physicists actually believe that the universe we live in might be a hologram.

The idea isn't that the universe is some sort of fake simulation out of The Matrix, but rather that even though we appear to live in a three-dimensional universe, it might only have two dimensions. It's called the holographic principle.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 30 2015

Big-Bang Theory: "The Universe has Slowed Down and Speeded Up Seven Times"


The universe has slowed down and speeded up, not just once, but 7 times in the last 13.8 billion years, on average emulating dark matter in the process. “The ringing has been decaying and is now very small – much like striking a crystal glass and hearing it ring down," say physicists Lawrence Mead and Harry Ringermacher at The University of Southern Mississippi, who have discovered that the universe might not only be expanding, but also oscillating or “ringing” at the same time.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 30 2015

Mystery Object Lights Up the Sky Over Parts of Georgia


A slow-moving mystery object lit up parts of the Georgia sky early this morning. NASA has five meteor cameras in the southeast part of the U.S. that picked up video of the object that was moving at approximately 14,500 mph at 1:30 a.m. ET.

William Cooke, lead for NASA Meteroid Environment Office, told ABC News today that “14,500 miles per hour is pretty fast, but it’s too slow to be a meteor. It was possibly reentry of space junk."

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page:   prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default