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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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April 1 2015

Is this ET? Mystery of strange radio bursts from space


Mysterious radio wave flashes from far outside the galaxy are proving tough for astronomers to explain. Is it pulsars? A spy satellite? Or an alien message?

BURSTS of radio waves flashing across the sky seem to follow a mathematical pattern. If the pattern is real, either some strange celestial physics is going on, or the bursts are artificial, produced by human – or alien – technology.

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April 1 2015

The moon's got two tails – and its friends might too


The man in the moon must be wearing a tailcoat. Turns out, our satellite has two tails of particles streaming in its wake. If the same is true of other bodies in the solar system, it could give us a way to study their surfaces without having to land.

Data from NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), which spent seven months orbiting the moon in 2013 and 2014, has revealed a tail of nanoscale dust particles.

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April 1 2015

LHC expects to restart within days


Protons may whizz around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as early as this weekend, after a successful operation to fix a short circuit which had delayed its restart, according to Paul Collier, head of beams at CERN.

CERN, Europe’s particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, had planned to switch on the souped up collider last week after a two-year shutdown for upgrades (see LHC 2.0: A new view of the Universe). But the lab put its plans on hold after the machine developed a fault.

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April 1 2015

Scan allows scientists to determine biological age from the face alone


Scientists have created a 3D imaging system they claim can reliably predict a person’s biological age from the look of their face alone.

The researchers believe the technology could be used to judge whether proposed anti-ageing treatments have any effect, and to help doctors fine-tune advice and therapies for their patients.

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April 1 2015

Quit Smoking in Your Sleep


Many decades of research have shown that people cannot learn new information during sleep and then retrieve it once awake. Yet a growing body of work finds that unconscious associations made during sleep can affect waking behaviors. One new study found that pairing the smell of cigarettes with unpleasant odors made people smoke less during the following week.


Related: Revealed, what smoking does to an unborn baby: Remarkable images of foetus holding its face show how babies exposed to cigarettes may have delayed development

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April 1 2015

Letting Kids Taste Alcohol May Promote Early Drinking


Children who try a sip of alcohol before sixth grade may be more likely to start drinking by the time they enter high school, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that kids who had tastes of an alcoholic beverage before they started middle school were five times more likely to have a full drink by ninth grade, compared with their classmates who had not tasted alcohol.

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April 1 2015

Generous welfare benefits make people more likely to want to work, not less


Generous welfare benefit levels make people who are not in employment more likely to want to work rather than less, new research suggests. "Many scholars and commentators fear that generous social benefits threaten the sustainability of the welfare state due to work norm erosion, disincentives to work and dependency cultures," the researchers say.

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April 1 2015

Rats see the pain in other rats’ faces


Rats and mice in pain make facial expressions similar to those in humans—so similar, in fact, that a few years ago researchers developed rodent “grimace scales,” which help them assess an animal’s level of pain simply by looking at its face. But scientists have questioned whether these expressions convey anything to other rodents, or if they are simply physiological reactions devoid of meaning. Now, researchers report that other rats do pay attention to the emotional expressions of their fellows, leaving an area when they see a rat that’s suffering.

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April 1 2015

Germany working to end mass killing of male chicks by 2017


The German government says it wants to end the mass killing of male chicks within two years, becoming the first country to do so.

Each year some 45 million male chicks in Germany are shredded shortly after hatching because they don't lay eggs.

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April 1 2015

Tiny songbird discovered to migrate non-stop, 1,500 miles over the Atlantic


For more than 50 years, scientists had tantalizing clues suggesting that a tiny, boreal forest songbird known as the blackpoll warbler departs each fall from New England and eastern Canada to migrate nonstop in a direct line over the Atlantic Ocean toward South America, but proof was hard to come by.

Now, for the first time an international team of biologists report "irrefutable evidence" that the birds complete a nonstop flight ranging from about 1,410 to 1,721 miles (2,270 to 2,770 km) in just two to three days, making landfall somewhere in Puerto Rico, Cuba and the islands known as the Greater Antilles, from there going on to northern Venezuela and Columbia.

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April 1 2015

Color Isn't Always About Sex, Study Finds


When it comes to birds, males—with their bright feathers, extra accessories, and impressive mating displays—tend to get all the attention. But for many birds, such as the Choco Toucan pictured above, brilliant plumage has nothing to do with sex, and everything to do with survival.


Alt: Bright bird plumage resulted from natural, sexual selection

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April 1 2015

Tiny beetles don’t cause big fires, study finds, raising policy questions


Vast armies of tiny, tree-killing insects called bark beetles have eaten their way through millions of hectares of pine forest in the western United States since the mid-1990s, leaving the mountains of Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, and other states riddled with dead trees. But contrary to popular belief, say the authors of a new study, the beetles aren’t to blame for the record-breaking extent of the wildfires that have torched the region’s forests in recent years.

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April 1 2015

Scientists discover elusive secret of how continents formed


An international research team, led by a Virginia Tech geoscientist, has revealed information about how continents were generated on Earth more than 2.5 billion years ago -- and how those processes have continued within the last 70 million years to profoundly affect the planet's life and climate.

Published online today in Nature Geoscience, the study details how relatively recent geologic events -- volcanic activity 10 million years ago in what is now Panama and Costa Rica -- hold the secrets of the extreme continent-building that took place billions of years earlier.

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April 1 2015

A Day's A Day The World Around — But Shorter On Saturn


Researchers have answered a question that has been nagging them for years: Exactly how long is a day on the planet Saturn? The result (10 hours and 32 minutes or so) was published this week in the journal Nature, and could teach scientists more about the giant, ringed planet.

A day is simply how long it takes a planet to spin all the way around. On Earth, one rotation takes 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4 seconds — though earthlings round up to 24 hours even.

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April 1 2015

Why this next lunar eclipse will be different


Blink and you might miss it. Nearly half the globe will have the ability to observe a total lunar eclipse this weekend, but skywatchers will have to be quick about it, because it will be the shortest total lunar eclipse of the century.

According to NASA, the total eclipse will last just five minutes. The first part of the eclipse will can be seen from Eastern North American and western South America before sunrise.

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April 1 2015

Giant Alien Planet Has 4 Suns in Its Sky


Planets with four suns in their sky may be more common than previously thought, a new study suggests.

Astronomers have spotted a fourth star in a planetary system called 30 Ari, bringing the number of known planet-harboring quadruple-sun systems to two. Numerous two- and three-star exoplanets have been identified.

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March 31 2015

Mercury 'painted black' by passing comets


Mercury's dark surface was produced by a steady dusting of carbon from passing comets, a new study says.

Mercury reflects very little light but its surface is low in iron, which rules out the presence of iron nanoparticles, the most likely "darkening agent".

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News desk archive...

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