Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  next  >>>

 

May 21 2015

Stone tool discovery pushes back dawn of culture by 700,000 years


The oldest known stone tools, dating to long before the emergence of modern humans, have been discovered in Africa.

The roughly-hewn stones, which are around 3.3 million years old, have been hailed by scientists as a “new beginning to the known archaeological record” and push back the dawn of culture by 700,000 years.


Alt: 'New beginning to the known archaeological record' as oldest stone tools ever discovered found in Kenya

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Oldest broken bone reveals our ancestors' switch to life on land


IT WAS one small fall for a tetrapod, but it signals one giant leap for tetrapod kind. A broken leg bone pushes back the emergence of our four-legged ancestors from water on to land by at least 2 million years.

A gap in the tetrapod fossil record means we know little about what happened between the time when limbs evolved from fish fins some 360 million years ago and the first land-adapted tetrapods appeared 330 million years ago.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Ancient Mourners May Have Left Flowers on 'Red Lady Grave'


Ancient mourners may have left flowers on the grave of an Ice-Age woman known as the Red Lady of El Mirón, new research suggests.

The woman, called the Red Lady because her body and bones had been smeared with a brilliant, sparkling pigment made from red ocher, lived about 18,700 years ago and was buried in a cave in what is now Spain. A large clump of pollen that was unearthed in the burial suggests people at the time placed flowers into the woman's grave, researchers said in a new study.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Neanderthal hunters became the hunted: Fossils found with puncture wounds


Neanderthals were tough enough to survive for almost 200,000 years and thrived during the freezing conditions of most of the last Ice Age.

But it seems these thick-boned, heavily built ancient human cousins were not strong enough to escape becoming meals for large predators that lived alongside them.

While Neanderthals are known to have been formidable hunters themselves, forensic analysis of injuries on their remains has suggested they fell victim to carnivores such as bears or big cats.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Why is it raining spiders in Australia?


Millions of tiny spiders recently fell from the sky in Australia, alarming residents whose properties were suddenly covered with not only the creepy critters, but also mounds of their silky threads. But that's not where the frightful news ends: Experts say that such arachnid rains aren't as uncommon as you might think.

This month's spider downpour in the country's Southern Tablelands region is just the most recent example of a phenomenon commonly known as "spider rain" or, in some circles, "angel hair,".

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Male Java sparrows may 'drum' to their songs


Male Java sparrows may coordinate their bill-clicking sounds with the notes of their song, according to a study published May 20, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Masayo Soma and Chihiro Mori from Hokkaido University, Japan.

Birds may communicate using both vocalizations and movement, as for instance occurs during courtship displays, but scientists' understanding of how they coordinate their movements with the sounds they produce is limited. To further investigate birds' communicative and musical abilities, the authors of this study looked into the vocalizations and bill sounds associated with singing in the Java sparrow, a song bird.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Bigger brains help female fish outwit predators and live longer


"As clever as a guppy" is not a huge compliment. But intelligence does matter to these tropical fish: big-brained guppies are more likely to outwit predators and live longer than their dim-witted peers.

Alexander Kotrschal at Stockholm University, Sweden, and his colleagues bred guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to have brains that were bigger or smaller than average. His team previously showed that bigger brains meant smarter fish.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

The octopus can see with its skin


Octopuses are well known for changing the colour, patterning, and texture of their skin to blend into their surroundings and send signals to each other, an ability that makes them both the envy of, and inspiration for, army engineers trying to develop cloaking devices. As if that wasn’t already impressive enough, research published today in the Journal of Experimental Biology shows that octopus skin contains the pigment proteins found in eyes, making it responsive to light.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Chatting with endangered possums may be the ticket to save them


How do you locate small, incredibly rare, shy and speedy possums that like to hang out at the very tops of the tallest trees? You talk to them, of course.

Leadbeater or "fairy" possums (Gymnobelideus leadbeateri) are critically endangered and only a few thousand of them live in a tiny 70 by 80 kilometre stretch of swampy forest north-east of Melbourne, Australia.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

The case for chimpanzee 'personhood'


Hercules and Leo don't know it, but a decision about their future has made history. In granting an order to show cause on whether Hercules and Leo (who just happen to be chimpanzees) are illegally imprisoned, a Supreme Court judge in Manhattan has kept open the possibility that some nonhuman animals will be granted legal rights under common law.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Most European men descend from a handful of Bronze Age forefathers


Geneticists from the University of Leicester have discovered that most European men descend from just a handful of Bronze Age forefathers, due to a 'population explosion' several thousand years ago.

The project, which was funded by the Wellcome Trust, was led by Professor Mark Jobling from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics and the study is published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.


Alt: Most European men descended from just three ancestors

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Ancient Mesoamerican Recipe For Cooking Human Flesh Stuns Archaeologists


The most famous cannibal in modern cinema delivered a line that became iconic precisely because it evokes in the audience both hunger and disgust. Humans eat food to sate a biological need; we eat to cement social relationships; we eat for emotional, ritual, and celebratory reasons. But often, humans eat other humans for the same reasons.

At the Mesoamerican site of Tlatelcomila not far from Mexico City, human bones dating to the Late Preclassic Period, 700-500 BC, show evidence of cannibalism.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Megalith to be Erected for Research


The Sophia Project seeks to understand how humans, going back thousands of years, moved and raised very large stones. How cultures of the past undertook these complex and sophisticated projects, without modern heavy equipment, has remained an enduring mystery of humanity.

How did they do it? With the help of “Sophia,” we’re going to show the world how.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

‘Monuments Men’ come together to protect ancient Syrian artifacts from Islamic State militants


This is the ancient site of Palmyra in Syria, and it’s currently being protected by a group of ‘Monuments Men’, who have have banded together to help protect the area’s 2,000-year-old artefacts from the hands of barbaric Islamic State militants.

The group, who have been dubbed the ‘Monuments Men’ after the George Clooney film of the same name, are attempting to protect the ancient ruins amid fears that Isis would destroy artefacts at the UNESCO world heritage site, after similar acts of destruction.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

Fears for Palmyra's ancient treasures as Isis retakes northern part of Syrian city


Islamic State fighters have inched closer to the centre of Palmyra, seizing a third of the historic city in a seesaw battle with Bashar al-Assad’s regime that has endangered thousands of civilians and the Unesco world heritage site’s ancient ruins.

“[Isis] is advancing into the city with artillery and suicide bombers and is tilting the balance in its favour,” Ahmad al-Nasser, an activist with the pro-opposition Local Coordination Committee of Tadmur, the modern name for Palmyra, told the Guardian. “There are thousands of civilians with the regime and if it falls there will be a huge massacre.”.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 21 2015

2,300-Year-Old Historic Site To Be Replaced With An Apartment Block In Egypt


A group of activists called the “Heritage Taskforce” have submitted a legal complaint against the Ministry of Antiquities for the destruction of a Hellenistic-era archaeological site by the Alexandrian coast.

The antiquities ministry’s ruling to level Al-Abd Theatre in order to allow a contractor to build an apartment block has frustrated and angered the heritage activists, who campaigned unsuccessfully to stop the decision.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 20 2015

Archaeology: Bulgarian dig finds 8000-year-old ‘double-storey’ houses


Bulgarian archaeologists say that they have found 60 houses from a Neolithic settlement, estimated to date back 8000 years, that were seven to eight metres high and that had streets between them.

The find was made near the village of Mursalevo, about 67km from Bulgarian capital Sofia, in the Kyustendil region in south-western Bulgaria by archaeologists working along the route of the Struma motorway being built to link Sofia to the Greek border.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default