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April 28 2015

Have scientists found a way to 'switch off' hunger?


We all know what it’s like to try and lose weight, only to find ourselves gorging on chocolate once the hunger pangs strike.

There could be hope for dieters however, after scientists identified the brain cells which create the sensation of hunger – findings that they say create "a promising new target for the development of weight-loss drugs”.

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April 28 2015

Youthful binge drinking changes the brain - for the worse - into adulthood


The adult brain that was awash in alcohol during its formative years looks different and acts differently than an adult brain that skipped the youthful binge drinking, says a new study conducted on rats.

All grown up, the brain exposed to periodic alcoholic benders during adolescence and young adulthood shows persistent abnormalities in the structure and function of the hippocampus, the region most closely associated with learning and memory.

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April 28 2015

Cannabis use could implant false memories, scientists warn


Cannabis use can lead to people remembering things that never happened, according to a new study.

While scientists have long known that the drug makes people forgetful, the new study finds that it can make them more likely to remember something that didn’t happen at all.

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April 28 2015

Jamaica Just Planted Its First Legal Marijuana Plant


Jamaica just planted its first-ever legal marijuana plant.

The first legal cannabis plant in the country was planted on the grounds of the University of the West Indies Mona campus on Monday.

The University has been accorded an order by the government to cultivate marijuana for medical research and to “set the pace for the development of a legal cannabis industry.”.

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April 28 2015

New Tyrannosaurus-like vegetarian dinosaur discovered in Chile


Dinosaurs come in all shapes and sizes but there has been nothing quite so unusual as a species found in the Patagonian fossil fields of Chile, scientists have said.

A study of the 150m-year-old remains of a Tyrannosaurus-like dinosaur showed that although it shares many of the features of its more fearsome carnivorous cousin, it grazed exclusively on plants.

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April 28 2015

Could we 'de-extinctify' the woolly mammoth?


Extinction, it seems, may no longer be for ever. Several weeks ago, scientists in George Church’s lab at Harvard University announced that they had created living elephant cells that contained a small component of synthesised mammoth DNA. The announcement stirred both excitement and concern that the mammoth – a hairier cousin of the Asian elephant – might soon be back from the dead. But how close are we really to seeing resurrected mammoths wandering their old stamping grounds, including the Norfolk countryside? The answer depends on how you define mammoth.

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April 28 2015

Alternate theory of inhabitation of North America disproved


There has long been a debate among scholars about the origins of the first inhabitants of North America. The most widely accepted theory is that sometime before 14,000 years ago, humans migrated from Siberia to Alaska by means of a "land bridge" that spanned the Bering Strait. However, in the 1990s, a small but vocal group of researchers proposed that North America was first settled by Upper Paleolithic people from Europe, who moved from east to west through Greenland via a glacial "ice bridge." Now, researchers at the University of Missouri, working with colleagues the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and elsewhere, have definitively disproved the ice bridge theory.

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April 28 2015

Reindeer Antlers Suggest Viking Age Began With Trade


Antlers from Norwegian reindeer have been unearthed in Ribe, the oldest commercial center in Denmark. The antlers have been dated to A.D. 725, some 70 years before the Viking raid on the Lindisfarne monastery in northern England. “The Viking Age becomes a phenomenon in Western Europe because the Vikings learned to use maritime mobility to their advantage.

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April 28 2015

Archaeologists to reconsider origins of industrial era obesity and cancer


Research begins on 1,500 skeletons from medieval and industrial-era London

Some of London’s most important skeletons will be digitally x-rayed and scanned in a new archaeological investigation linking “man-made” diseases with the industrialisation of the city.

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April 28 2015

Did modern humans wipe out the Neanderthals in Europe?


New research shows that modern humans settled Europe in two waves along distinct routes, coincidentally arriving about the time the Neanderthals disappeared, writes Darren Curnoe.

Fossils and DNA strongly suggest we shared a common ancestor with them, genetic clocks placing the split between us in the range of 550,000 to 765,000 years ago.

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April 28 2015

Britain 'is experiencing same decline as Rome in 100BC'


Britain is experiencing the same decline as Rome in 100BC, with the collapse of civilisation inevitable, a scientist has warned.

Dr Jim Penman, of the RMIT University in Melbourne, believes Britons no longer have the genetic temperament to advance because of decades of peace and a high standard of living.

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April 28 2015

Controversy erupts over ancient 'theatre' in Alexandria


The Ministry of Antiquities’ decision to remove artefacts unearthed on the site of Al-Abd Theatre in Alexandria and hand the land over to its original owner triggers a controversy

Archaeologists differed with the Ministry of Antiquities over a site known as Al-Abd Theatre overlooking the Mediterranean Sea in Camp Shizar, Alexandria.

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April 28 2015

Sudan's pyramids, nearly as grand as Egypt's, go unvisited


The small, steep pyramids rising up from the desert hills of northern Sudan resemble those in neighboring Egypt, but unlike the famed pyramids of Giza, the Sudanese site is largely deserted.

The pyramids at Meroe, some 200 kilometers (125 miles) north of Sudan's capital, Khartoum, are rarely visited despite being a UNESCO World Heritage site like those in Egypt.

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April 27 2015

Giant Easter Island 'Hats' Rolled Into Place, Study Says


The distinctive headgear worn by some of the famous Easter Island statues may have been rolled up ramps to reach those high perches, a new study suggests.

A simple analysis of the physics suggests that rolling the headwear — bulky cylindrical shapes that look like Russian fur hats — would have been a relatively easy matter, said study co-author Sean Hixon, an undergraduate student in archaeology and geology at the University of Oregon, who presented his findings here on April 16 at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology.

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April 27 2015

Binge drinking: What the ancient world can teach us about dealing with drunken revellers


As British police prepare to jet off to some Spanish resorts such as Magaluf in Majorca to help local police deal with drunken Britons, tourism chiefs will hear that there is nothing new about alcohol and drugs after sundown, and modern-day authorities could learn from the ancients about how to manage the resulting bad behaviour.

One of the first recorded parties was thrown by Gilgamesh, a Mesopotamian king who lived around 2,800BC. The epic poem about his exploits records how he promised workers “ale, beer and wine as a river so I could give them a celebration like new year”.

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April 27 2015

Confident speakers use region of brain less, scans reveal


It is a skill employed by stand-up comedians, politicians and market traders alike – an effortless way with words that can persuade, cajole and tease.

Now scientists believe they have found evidence of what may lie behind 'the gift of the gab'.

Brain scans on a group of professional comedians has revealed differences in the way the brains of these 'super speakers' work while talking.

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April 27 2015

Study finds that people with higher incomes have more sex.


This study comes straight out of our new favorite journal, the aptly named International Journal of Manpower. Here, the author set out to determine whether there’s a relationship between how much money a person earns and how much sex they have. From a survey of 7,500 people, he found that workers who have sex 2-3 times per week earn on average 4.5 percent more than workers who have sex less often. The direction of causality is still unclear (do people have more sex because they make more money, vice versa, or perhaps there are cases of each?). All we know for sure is that we are submitting our next paper to the International Journal of Manpower.

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