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March 31 2015

Superhealing Drug Travels in Nanoparticles to Wounds


A new topical medicine suspended in nanoparticles could dramatically quicken the time it takes wounds to heal, researchers say.

The medicine could be used to speed the healing of all sorts of wounds, according to the researchers who are developing it. Applications could include everyday cuts and burns, surgical incisions, and chronic skin ulcers, which are a particular concern for the elderly and people with diabetes.

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March 31 2015

Malaria antibodies discovery brings vaccine closer to reality, say researchers


A team of international researchers have made a major step towards a vaccine to for malaria, something scientists have long been trying to achieve as the disease kills up to 600,000 people each year.

There have been two major roadblocks – scientists did not know what part of the disease the immune system needed to target, nor did they know the mechanism used by the immune system to block an infection.

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March 31 2015

Cats relax to the sound of music


According to research* published today in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery by veterinary clinicians at the University of Lisbon and a clinic in the nearby town of Barreiro in Portugal, music is likewise beneficial for cats in the surgical environment. But not all music is equal in this respect - cats, it seems, benefit most from classical music.

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March 31 2015

Why Whale Songs Are Still One Of Science's Greatest Mysteries


Humpback whales are renowned for their ability to produce songs of remarkable beauty, complexity, and duration. But despite decades of research, scientists still aren't sure why these whales engage in such elaborate acoustic displays. Here's what we know — and have yet to learn — about the humpback whale's song.


Related: Japanese whaling ships return home from Antarctic with no catch

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March 31 2015

Good luck and the Chinese reverse global forest loss


Analysis of 20 years of satellite data has revealed the total amount of vegetation globally has increased by almost 4 billion tonnes of carbon since 2003. This is despite ongoing large-scale deforestation in the tropics.

An Australian-led international team of scientists published the findings in Nature Climate Change, finding a range of causes for the increase.

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March 31 2015

Exercise can outweigh harmful effects of air pollution


The beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality, new research shows. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution.

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March 31 2015

A big bank balance leads to big-brained babies


Have Mum and Dad got a few quid to spare? You'd better hope so, because the wealthier your parents are, the larger the surface area of your brain is likely to be – a structural feature known to be associated with greater intelligence in children.


Alt: Can money buy your kids a bigger brain?

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March 31 2015

Eating green leafy vegetables keeps mental abilities sharp


Something as easy as adding more spinach, kale, collards and mustard greens to your diet could help slow cognitive decline, according to new research. The study also examined the nutrients responsible for the effect, linking vitamin K consumption to slower cognitive decline for the first time.

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March 31 2015

Pesticide residue on food could affect sperm quality, says Harvard study


Eating fruit and vegetables containing pesticide residues could adversely affect men’s fertility, leading to fewer and poorer quality sperm, a study suggests.

Research by Harvard University found that men who ate the greatest amount of fruit and vegetables with high levels of pesticide residue had a 49% lower sperm count and a 32% fewer normally formed sperm than those who consumed the least.

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March 31 2015

Did arsenic poisoning make gods limp?


Vulcan was the big and muscly Roman god of fire and metal workers. Just like most of the gods (and many metal workers) he was impressively built. But all the legends describe him as walking with a limp.

Some industrial health workers now think that Vulcan got his limp from possibly the first known industrial disease — arsenic poisoning.

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March 31 2015

China's 'Stonehenge' found in the Gobi Desert


Around 200 mysterious stone structures have mystified experts since they were discovered in the Gobi Desert in 2003.

Known as the ‘strange stone circles’ by locals in Turpan, the formations vary in size and shape with one intricate example resembling the sun.

And now an expert has suggested they could have been used by primitive nomads to worship the sun, and may have even been a site where sacrifices were made - although the types of sacrifices is not known.

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March 30 2015

Bolivia detects buried pyramid at Tiahuanaco site


The government of Bolivia announced it will start exploratory excavations this year at the ancient fortress of Tiahuanaco after a buried pyramid was detected.

Ludwing Cayo, director of the Tiahuanaco Archeological Research Center, told Efe that the formation is located in the area of Kantatallita, east of the Akapana pyramid.

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March 30 2015

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public


Just a year after one of Spain’s most important historical sites, the Altamira cave, was reopened to the public, scientists are now saying tourists are causing permanent damage to one of the finest examples of Palaeolithic art anywhere in the world.

A total of 17 academics and 70 researchers from Madrid’s Complutense University have signed an open letter to Unesco arguing that public access to the cave “endangers a fragile legacy of great importance for our understanding of Palaeolithic society”.

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March 30 2015

Ancient Egyptian beer making vessels discovered in Israel


Fragments of pottery used by Egyptians to make beer and dating back 5,000 years have been discovered on a building site in Tel Aviv, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said Sunday.

Excavation director Diego Barkan said 17 pits were found that had been used to store produce in the Early Bronze Age, from 3500 to 3000 BC.


Related: Israel using bogus archaeological digs as cover to take Palestinian land, British government says

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March 30 2015

From Siberia with size: 'New species' of big dinosaur found, scientists claim


Technically Incorrect: In Russia, scientists say they've found enough bones to now identify something we might want to call the Sibirosaurus. And it's a doozy.

It's a little like fracking. The more we dig, the scarier our findings. And now, it seems, something terribly scary has been dug up, according to Russian scientists in the heart of Siberia.


Alt: Scientists discover 'new species' of dinosaur

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March 30 2015

Prehistoric super salamander was top predator, fossils suggest


A previously undiscovered species of crocodile-like amphibian that lived during the rise of dinosaurs was among Earth's top predators more than 200 million years ago, a study shows. Palaeontologists identified the prehistoric species -- which looked like giant salamanders -- after excavating bones buried on the site of an ancient lake in southern Portugal.

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March 30 2015

Injured tortoise given 3D printed shell


A tortoise has been given a 3D printed prosthetic shell to protect her own, as she suffers from a painful disease which has caused it to wear away.

Cleopatra, a leopard tortoise who was taken in by Canyon Critters Reptile Rescue in Colorado, suffers from a metabolic bone disease known as pyramiding, or peaking.


Alt: Cleopatra the tortoise gets a 3D printed shell

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