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May 28 2014

Freezing stabbing victims in suspended animation could save lives as trials begin


Doctors are set to recreate a sci-fi technique as they begin suspended animation by freezing trauma victims in the hope of keeping them alive.

The technique will be used on ten patients who would otherwise be expected to die from their wounds, which will likely come from stabbings or shootings. The doctors on the project will be paged when a patient is likely to fit the procedure. There is around one such case every month, and they have a survival rate of less than 7 per cent.

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May 28 2014

Beer goggles are real, says sober science


Scientists at the University of Bristol in the UK insist that alcohol allows you to find people more attractive. This contradicts some previous research.

One of the reasons science exists is to reassure us that we are not, in fact, crazy.

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May 28 2014

Origins of Inebriation Revealed


In prehistoric Eurasia, drugs and alcohol were originally reserved for ritual ceremonies, and weren't used merely to satisfy hedonistic motives, a new study suggests. What's more, given the sacred role of the substances, their use was likely highly regulated and only available to elite citizens.

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May 28 2014

Cod bones reveal 13th century origin of global fish trade


London's international fish trade can be traced back 800 years to the medieval period, according to new research published today in the journal Antiquity.

The research, led by archaeologists from UCL, Cambridge and UCLan, provides new insight into the medieval fish trade and the globalisation of London's food supply.

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May 28 2014

Rock-Shelter in Spain Evidences Early Human Use of Fire


In a report co-authored by Michael Walker and colleagues of Spain's Murcia University, scientists suggest that early humans who lived in the Cueva Negra (Black Cave) rock-shelter of southeastern Spain about 800,000 years ago used fire, and that they exhibited behaviors that indicated a cognitively sophisticated late early Pleistocene use of resources and tools in their environment. The detailed report is published in the upcoming Volume 15 of Popular Archaeology Magazine.

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May 28 2014

Earth's Oldest Life? Probably Not, New Study Says


What were thought to be some of the oldest traces of life on Earth may not have been caused by life at all, new research suggests.

The fossils, tiny tubules etched into ancient rocks in South Africa, were initially thought to be formed by ancient bacteria boring through volcanic glass in the seafloor — a process called bioalteration — during the Archean Eon, about 3.4 billion years ago.

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May 28 2014

Where have all the craters gone?


Impact craters reveal one of the most spectacular geologic process known to human beings. During the past 3.5 billion years, it is estimated that more than 80 bodies, larger than the dinosaur-killing asteroid that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago, have bombarded Earth.

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May 28 2014

Peat Bog the Size of England Discovered in Congo


A massive peat bog covering some 40,000 to 80,000 square miles has been discovered in the central African nation of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, reported the BBC.

After satellite images suggested what could be a huge tropical peatland -- about the size of England, according to the BBC -- in a remote area of Congo-Brazzaville, a research team from the University of Leeds, the Wildlife Conservation Society-Congo, and Congo-Brazzaville's Marien Ngouabi University ventured into the soggy area and confirmed its presence.

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May 27 2014

US shutting down conspiracy theorists' favourite military site


The US government site that conspiracy theorists blame with some of the biggest natural disasters in recent history is set to close this summer. HAARP, a military site studying the atmosphere, is no longer needed by the country, it has said.

Conspiracy theorists claim that the US can use the facility to modify weather, disable satellites and control minds. It has been blamed for causing freak weather, natural disasters and diseases, as well as industrial calamities such as the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster.

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May 27 2014

The South Atlantic Anomaly could be the Bermuda Triangle of Space


JUST above Brazil, there lies a region in space where satellites and telescopes constantly have problems, computers on the International Space Station crash and where astronauts report seeing strange lights flash before their eyes.

The region is known as The South Atlantic Anomaly, but according to Mother Nature Network most people just refer to it as “The Bermuda Triangle of Space”.

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May 27 2014

Where Do Baby Sea Turtles Go?


After baby loggerhead turtles hatch, they wait until dark and then dart from their sandy nests to the open ocean. A decade or so later they return to spend their teenage years near those same beaches. What the turtles do and where they go in those juvenile years has been a mystery for decades. Marine biologists call the period the “lost years.”

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May 27 2014

From chaos to order: How ants optimize food search


Ants are capable of complex problem-solving strategies that could be widely applied as optimization techniques. An individual ant searching for food walks in random ways, biologists found. Yet the collective foraging behaviour of ants goes well beyond that, as a mathematical study to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals: The animal movements at a certain point change from chaos to order. This happens in a surprisingly efficient self-organized way. Understanding the ants could help analyze similar phenomena - for instance how humans roam in the internet.

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May 27 2014

Huge Swath of Amazon Preserved in Record-Setting Deal


On May 21, the Brazilian government, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and partners announced the creation of a $215 million fund to ensure long-term protection of the world's largest network of protected areas — 150 million acres of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

It's not often as conservationists that we get to celebrate such a big win.

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May 27 2014

China to scrap millions of cars in anti-pollution push


China plans to take more than five million ageing vehicles off the roads this year in a bid to improve air quality, with 330,000 cars set to be decommissioned in Beijing alone, the government said in a policy document published on Monday.

Pollution has emerged as an urgent priority for China's leaders as they try to reverse the damage done by decades of breakneck growth and head off public anger about the sorry state of the nation's air, water and soil.

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May 27 2014

Algae biofuel can help meet world energy demand, researchers say


Microalgae-based biofuel not only has the potential to quench a sizable chunk of the world's energy demands, say Utah State University researchers. It's a potential game-changer.

"That's because microalgae produces much higher yields of fuel-producing biomass than other traditional fuel feedstocks and it doesn't compete with food crops," says USU mechanical engineering graduate student Jeff Moody.

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May 27 2014

Crazy plan to cover the nation's roads with solar panels raises $1 million


In theory, the idea could work: replace all the nation’s asphalt with solar panels, and we’d generate more than three times the electricity the US uses. Solar Roadways’ design would also filter stormwater, replace above-ground power cables, prevent icy roads by melting snow, and light up to warn drivers if a moose wanders onto the road.

Unfortunately, the list of obstacles is long.

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May 27 2014

Can 'Mixed Reality Living Spaces' fix our overcrowded future?


With the world population expected to rise from 7.2 billion to 9.6 billion by 2050, living space is becoming more and more of an issue. A student at Parsons has a vision of our future homes that is both clever and disquieting. Bernando Schorr's "Mixed Reality Living Spaces" project highlights how augmented reality can be used to make windowless 100-square-foot apartments hospitable.

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