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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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January 2 2015

Excavation suggests human presence at Old Vero Man site in Florida


Were he alive today, E.H. Sellards, Florida state geologist in the early 1900s, would likely have revelled in the validation of his controversial theory that humans co-existed with large prehistoric animals some 14,000 years ago in Vero Beach, Florida.

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January 2 2015

Ancient Amulet Discovered with Curious Palindrome Inscription


An ancient, two-sided amulet uncovered in Cyprus contains a 59-letter inscription that reads the same backwards as it does forwards.

Archaeologists discovered the amulet, which is roughly 1,500 years old, at the ancient city of Nea Paphos in southwest Cyprus.

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January 2 2015

Ancient Coyotes Had Larger Jaws, Sharper Teeth


Ancient coyotes hunted large prey, and had larger jaws and sharper teeth to bring down their choice meals than modern-day coyotes do, a new study reports.

The fierce coyotes of the past (Canis latrans) likely ate the young of large animals that roamed North America during the Pleistocene epoch, including juvenile llamas, camels and horses. But climate change and, to a small extent, human hunters, likely killed off these large animals as the Pleistocene ended about 11,500 years ago.

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January 2 2015

Giant Fossils Get Renewed Life with 3D Scans


The cracked and broken bones of a 1.8-million-year-old crocodile, elephant and giant tortoise are now recorded in meticulous detail, thanks to cutting-edge 3D scanners.

When the bones were discovered at the Turkana Lake Basin in northern Kenya in the 1970s, they were in considerably better shape than they are now. But at the time, the fossils were too large to safely transport to Nairobi, a 3.5-day boat trip from the site.

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January 2 2015

Artist Turns Dna From Chewed Gum Into Sculptures


Two years ago, artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg caused a stir in both the art and biosecurity worlds when she displayed busts of people she’d never met. She determined the facial features for her “Stranger Visions” show using DNA found in the streets and subways of New York City. “We are shedding our biological information all the time without knowing it,” Dewey-Hagborg says. “I think anonymity should be a choice.” She devised her next project with that thought in mind. The pair of perfume-like sprays she invented, called Invisible, obscures DNA traces so no one can follow your genetic trail.

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January 2 2015

You could be wearing your alibi right now


IN LATE November, a court case in Calgary, Canada, set an unusual record. Lawyers representing a personal trainer injured in an accident were the first to wield data from a wearable device in the courtroom. They planned to use the sluggish activity levels recorded by their client's Fitbit fitness tracker to prove the lasting effect of her accident.

Evidence gleaned from sources like email, social media and GPS trackers has already become common in trials.

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January 2 2015

Climate Change Will Alter the Taste of Wine


It was a hot day in the vineyard, and I was covered in dust, sweat and sticky juice from the grapes I had been collecting for my research on how grape biochemistry is affected by light and temperature. Suddenly, I saw something that made me stop short. Tucked in one corner of this 6.5-acre plot in Carneros, in California's fabled Sonoma Valley, with row after neat row of Pinot Noir grapes, were a handful of alien vines. I had studied the arcane art of ampelography—the practice of identifying grapevines by the shape of their leaves and clusters, as part of my graduate training in viticulture—so I took an educated guess at what they were: the red varieties Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Syrah and Malbec, plus a white, Sauvignon Blanc.

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January 2 2015

White wine may not really exist


THAT Chardonnay you're drinking is more of a red wine than it looks. It turns out that white grapes also contain the pigments that give red wine its colour – anthocyanins.

Most sources say that "what distinguishes red from white is that white wine grapes don't have anthocyanins," says Panagiotis Arapitsas of Italy's Edmund Mach Foundation.

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January 2 2015

Filmmaker says he uncovered Nazis’ ‘biggest secret weapons facility’ underground


An Austrian filmmaker believes he has discovered a huge Nazi “secret weapons facility” in an underground complex near the remains of the Mathausen-Gusen concentration camp in Austria, where thousands of Jews were killed.

“This was a giant industrial complex and most likely the biggest secret weapons production facility of the Third Reich,” documentary filmmaker Andreas Sulzer told the Sunday Times. The underground complex is connected to the B8 Bergkristall underground factory, where Germans produced the first jet fighters, the Messerschmitt Me 262.

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January 2 2015

High-Tech Airships Could Be NASA's Next Challenge


One of NASA's new citizen science endeavors could involve high-tech, record-breaking airships designed to aid scientific research projects.

NASA has proposed a challenge that calls for airship designs that can fly higher and longer than existing airships. At the moment, no airship — blimp-like devices — can maintain an altitude of 65,000 feet (20 kilometers) for more than 8 hours. Weather balloons can soar to that height, but the balloons are difficult to control and vulnerable to winds.

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January 2 2015

NASA team hacks Opportunity to treat Mars rover's amnesia


NASA’s Mars rover Opportunity has been working well into its golden years – after nearly 11 years roaming the Red Planet, it has survived more than 40 times past its warranty. But now, this trusty veteran explorer is experiencing some worrisome memory loss.

The long-lived rover has been having some senior moments, according to John Callas, project manager for the Mars Exploration Rover mission (as Opportunity and its defunct twin Spirit are formally known).

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January 1 2015

Could the Dwarf Planet Ceres Support Life?


SAN FRANCISCO — A NASA probe is about to get the first up-close look at a potentially habitable alien world.

In March 2015, NASA's Dawn spacecraft will arrive in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Ceres is a relatively warm and wet body that deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as the Jovian moon Europa and the Saturn satellite Enceladus, both of which may be capable of supporting life as we know it, some researchers say.

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January 1 2015

Mars Rover Opportunity Suffers Worrying Bouts of 'Amnesia'


Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the Martian surface for over a decade — that's an amazing ten years longer than the 3-month primary mission it began in January 2004. But with its great successes, inevitable age-related issues have surfaced and mission engineers are being challenged by an increasingly troubling bout of rover "amnesia."

Opportunity utilizes two types of memory to record mission telemetry as it explores the Meridiani Planum region. Sister rover Spirit, which sadly succumbed to the Martian elements in 2010 after 6 years of exploring Mars, used the same system. The two types of memory are known as "volatile" and "non-volatile.".

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January 1 2015

Are Ocean Asteroid Impacts Really a Serious Threat?


If a space rock were to hit the Earth at just the right location in the oceans, it could cause massive waves that could inundate U.S. coastlines, a new computer simulation suggests.

For instance, if an asteroid were to hit the continental shelf off the Maryland coast, it could produce 23-foot-high (7 meters) waves, causing flooding from New York to Georgia that would take hours to recede. A similar impact off the coast of California could flood major power plants along the coast, the research also suggests.

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January 1 2015

Four Ways Spacefaring Microbes Could Muck Up The Solar System


WHEN SCIENTISTS LAUNCH A SPACECRAFT INTO SPACE, THEY'RE ALSO LAUNCHING THOUSANDS OF BACTERIA ALONG WITH IT

To prepare the Curiosity rover for its trip to Mars, NASA scrubbed it with alcohol and baked it at 230°F. This is part of the agency’s protocol for “planetary protection,” a policy devised in the 1950s to keep earthly microbes from contaminating other worlds.

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January 1 2015

Nano Sensor Could Detect Microscopic Aliens


When exploring the solar system or interstellar space, some scientists look for signs that we might not be the only life in the universe. They might look for radio signals or evidence of organic chemistry familiar here on Earth.

But what if the signals or chemistry of alien life are completely unfamiliar to us? How would we recognize them?

Scientists at the Swiss research center, EPFL, think a clue could come from movement. They’ve created a tiny device that detects nanoscale vibrations that occur inside microscopic beings.

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January 1 2015

Robotic Cuttlefish Swims with Undulating Fins


As much as we enjoyed all of the robots performing in the ETH Zurich Autonomous Systems Lab’s video, one robot in particular stood out.

You may have spotted it too, at about 1:30: a robot with four orthogonal fins called Sepios.

The official Sepios swimout was in May of this (not much longer this, but still this) year.

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