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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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November 20 2014

Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Bronze Age Remains in Oman


Much is still unknown about these people who once occupied present-day northeastern Oman about 5,000 years ago. They left no written records, at least none that have been found to date. They made up what scholars and historians have referred to as the ancient Magan civilization.

“The people of Magan did not use writing or glyptic arts to record their history or organize their societies, so we know very little about their way of life,” write Christopher Thornton, Charlotte Cable and colleagues about the ancient society.

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November 20 2014

4,000-year-old razor used to keep facial hair tidy unearthed in Siberia


Beards may have seen a resurgence over recent years, but they have been used as status symbols for millenia.

The discovery of a 4,000-year-old blade in Russia, said to have been used for shaving and trimming, reveals the importance of looking well-presented during the Bronze Age.

Archaeologists explained that the thin bronze plate had been sharpened on both sides and added that it may have even doubled up as a knife.

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November 20 2014

Utah Cave Full of Children’s Moccasins Sheds Light on Little-Known Ancient Culture


Archaeologists on the trail of a little-known ancient culture have found a cache of clues that may help unlock its secrets: a cave containing hundreds of children’s moccasins.

The cave, on the shore of Utah’s Great Salt Lake, was first excavated in the 1930s, but the artifacts found there — and the questions that they raised — were largely forgotten until recently.

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November 19 2014

Skullture: A History of People Reshaping Their Heads


My bus tour through the Andes of southern Peru took an unexpected stop. We were in the cold, dry highlands, less than 100 miles from Arequipa, when the tour guide insisted that my fellow travelers and I get off the bus “to take a small hike.” We walked through a small farm with some rocky ruins of indeterminate age. But then the guide pointed to a big rock positioned over a hole and told us to look inside.

There were a number of skulls in the hole, and they didn’t look quite right. The crown was too dome-shaped, taller and more cylindrical than usual, it seemed.

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November 19 2014

'Forgotten' Brain Region Rediscovered a Century Later


A major pathway of the human brain involved in visual perception, attention and movement — and overlooked by many researchers for more than a century — is finally getting its moment in the sun.

In 2012, researchers made note of a pathway in a region of the brain associated with reading, but "we couldn't find it in any atlas," said Jason Yeatman, a research scientist at the University of Washington's Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. "We'd thought we had discovered a new pathway that no one else had noticed before."

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November 19 2014

Spice up your memory: Just one gram of turmeric a day could boost memory


Adding just one gram of turmeric to breakfast could help improve the memory of people who are in the very early stages of diabetes and at risk of cognitive impairment. The finding has particular significance given that the world's ageing population means a rising incidence of conditions that predispose people to diabetes, which in turn is connected to dementia.

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November 19 2014

Training can lead to synesthetic experiences: Does learning the 'color of' specific letters boost IQ


A new study has shown for the first time that people can be trained to "see" letters of the alphabet as colors in a way that simulates how those with synesthesia experience their world.

The University of Sussex research, published today (18 November 2014) in Scientific Reports, also found that the training might potentially boost IQ.

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November 19 2014

Could magnets in helmets reduce football concussions?


WASHINGTON, D.C.—Football has always been a violent sport. In the 1950s, when hard, polycarbonate shells replaced leather football helmets, the number of game-related fatalities plummeted. But hundreds of thousands of football-related concussions still occur every year. Now, one researcher is trying to harness the repulsive forces of magnets to reduce the impact of head-to-head collisions before they occur.

The idea is far from ready for the football field. It’s being tested in the lab, using machines for now. But one helmet expert says the strategy is worth pursuing given the seriousness of the problem.

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November 19 2014

Monkeys Steer Wheelchairs With Their Brains, Raising Hope for Paralyzed People


WASHINGTON, D.C.—Experimental wheelchairs and exoskeletons controlled by thought alone offer surprising insights into the brain, neuroscientists reported on Monday.

Best known for his experimental exoskeleton that helped a paralyzed man kick the opening ball for June's World Cup in Brazil, Duke University neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis presented the latest "brain-machine interface" findings from his team's "Walk Again Project" at the Society for Neuroscience meeting.

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November 19 2014

Fur Seal Sex With Penguin: Why Does It Happen?


Antarctic fur seal males have been seen forcing themselves on king penguins multiple times in shocking sexual acts that are radically changing the way animal experts attempt to explain such seemingly bizarre behavior.

At first it was thought that sex between animals of different species was a colossal error -- a result, maybe, of mistaken identity. The occurrences of male seals raping penguins, documented in the latest issue of the journal Polar Biology, suggest otherwise. Instead it may be a learned behavior by hormone-fueled males, which could weaken the overall reproductive fitness of both animals if it gets out of hand.


Alt: Seals Accused Of Sexually Attacking Penguins (GRAPHIC VIDEO)

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November 19 2014

How Genetically Engineered Gardens Could Replace Airport Security Checkpoints


The excruciating irritation of going through airport security could one day be as pleasant as walking through a garden. A genetically engineered garden, perhaps, but a garden nonetheless.

Plants are being increasingly seen as having the potential to replace sensors and electronic devices, which sounds completely insane at first brush.


Related: These Scientists Are Training Computers to Help Farmers Save Their Crops

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November 19 2014

Magic tricks created using artificial intelligence for the first time


Researchers working on artificial intelligence at Queen Mary University of London have taught a computer to create magic tricks.

The researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks, and the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

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November 19 2014

Using 3D printers to print out self-learning robots


When the robots of the future are set to extract minerals from other planets, they need to be both self-learning and self-repairing. Researchers at Oslo University have already succeeded in producing self-instructing robots on 3D printers.

On the third floor of the Department of Informatics there is a robotics laboratory which looks like a playroom This is where researchers are testing how their robots can figure out how to move past barriers and other obstacles.

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November 19 2014

World's First Zero-Gravity 3D Printer Installed on Space Station


It may not be a "Star Trek" replicator, but the first zero-gravity 3D printer is set up and ready for action on the International Space Station.

Station commander Barry "Butch" Wilmore of NASA installed the space 3D printer inside the orbiting lab's Microgravity Science Glovebox on Monday morning (Nov. 17). The machine and its software are in good operating condition, and the first test items will likely be printed sometime Monday, NASA officials said.

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November 19 2014

Dark matter could be seen in GPS time glitches


GPS has a new job. It does a great job of telling us our location, but the network of hyper-accurate clocks in space could get a fix on something far more elusive: dark matter.

Dark matter makes up 80 per cent of the universe's matter but scarcely interacts with ordinary matter. A novel particle is the most popular candidate, but Andrei Derevianko at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Maxim Pospelov at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada propose that kinks or cracks in the quantum fields that permeate the universe could be the culprit.

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November 19 2014

Strong Magnetic Fields Recorded in Meteorite Provide Clues to How Early Solar System Evolved


Scientists working on a primitive meteorite known as Semarkona have found evidence that the protoplanetary disk of the early Solar System was shaped by extremely strong magnetic fields that drove a massive amount of gas into the Sun within just a few million years.


Related: Gravity may have saved the universe after the Big Bang, say researchers - "New research by a team of European physicists could explain why the universe did not collapse immediately after the Big Bang."

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November 19 2014

Crowdfunded lunar mission will put donors’ hair on the moon


A crowdfunded moon lander that will drill deep into the lunar surface to study rocks that formed soon after the birth of the solar system has been announced by a British organisation.

Lunar Mission One aims to transform how space exploration is done by covering the costs of expeditions with millions of small payments from the public instead a major investment from national space agencies.

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