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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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March 27 2014

Living materials could grow products


Living materials based on bacteria and grown in a Boston lab could point to a greener way of manufacturing.

In future, complex and interactive structures could be grown using cells programmed to assemble into intricate patterns, the researchers argue.

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March 27 2014

Inflatable Wind Turbine to Float on Alaskan Skies


The title for world's largest wind turbine is constantly up for grabs as manufacturers build higher and bigger to capture more energy from the passing air.

One turbine in Alaska, however, will now spin high above the rest. Altaeros Energies will launch its high-altitude floating wind turbine south of Fairbanks to bring more affordable power to a remote community. Ben Glass, CEO of Altaeros told The New York Times that the company expects to provide power at about $0.18 per kilowatt-hour, about half the price of off-grid electricity in Alaska.

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March 27 2014

Rain used to illuminate low income homes


By collecting rainwater, students of the Technological University of Mexico (UNITEC) were able to generate electricity using a microturbine and supplying the vital liquid to homes in a poor community in Iztapalapa, in Mexico City.

This system is similar to that used in dams, which uses rainwater to rotate a microturbine and generate electricity.

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March 27 2014

Microturbines Purify Rainwater, Create Electricity


The parts of the world that lack for consistent electricity also, unfortunately, often lack for consistent clean water. Students at the Technological University of Mexico have come up with a simple system to at least partially address both needs using a microturbine and collected rainwater.

They named the device Pluvia, and tested it in a large, poverty-stricken part of Mexico City called Iztapalapa. Rainwater is collected by funneling it into a gutter on the rooftop, or by adding sheeting to simulate a slope.

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March 26 2014

Never Underestimate a Goat; It's Not As Stupid As It Looks


Goats are not just cute and somewhat comical, but also surprisingly intelligent, new research finds

Goats are members of a diverse group of mammals called ungulates. Ungulates include barnyard favorites like cows, sheep and donkeys—all great additions at petting zoos but not known for winning any intelligence prizes in the animal kingdom.

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March 26 2014

Yellowstone supervolcano unlikely to erupt for 1 to 2 million years


As with many things in nature, it helps to understand the past when trying to predict the future.

Ilya Bindeman, an associate professor of geological sciences at the University of Oregon, believes this is true of the Yellowstone supervolcano and the likelihood that it will produce an apocalyptic eruption as it has three times over the last the last 2 million years.

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March 26 2014

Roman Emperor Dressed As Egyptian Pharaoh in Newfound Carving


An ancient stone carving on the walls of an Egyptian temple depicts the Roman emperor Claudius dressed as an Egyptian pharaoh, wearing an elaborate crown, a team of researchers has discovered.

In the carving, Emperor Claudius, who reigned from A.D. 41 to 54, is shown erecting a giant pole with a lunar crescent at the top. Eight men, each wearing two feathers, are shown climbing the supporting poles, with their legs dangling in midair.

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March 26 2014

Forget GPS: Medieval Compass Guided Vikings After Sunset


Often regarded as ruthless robbers, the Vikings were also impressive mariners capable of traversing the North Atlantic along a nearly straight line. Now, new interpretations of a medieval compass suggest the sea robbers may have skillfully used the sun to operate the compass even when the sun had set below the horizon.

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March 26 2014

Vatican Library to digitise archives with Japanese support


The Vatican Library has begun digitising its priceless collection of ancient manuscripts dating from the origins of the Church.

The first stage of the project will cover some 3,000 handwritten documents over the next four years.

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March 26 2014

Bone Dusters Paleo Ale, Brewed from Real Fossils!


With craft brewing on the rise and many breweries tinkering with flavorings that range from the somewhat obvious (honey or citrus) to the eyebrow-raising (jalapeño, hemp, or even peanut butter cup) it was only a matter of time before someone stared a 35-million year old fossil in the face and thought, “would you make a good brew?” Well, the time has come, people.

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March 26 2014

Why Dark Pigeons Rule the Streets


Pigments in the feathers of birds with dark plumage may help the creatures rid their bloodstream of some toxic metals, thereby helping them better survive in urban or other polluted areas, a new study suggests. While the finding may help explain the higher proportion of darker colored pigeons in cities, some researchers suggest that other factors may play a larger role.

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March 26 2014

Ocean Fish Larvae Developed Heart Defects Following 2010 BP Oil Disaster, Study


Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have found heart defects in several Gulf of Mexico fish embryos following exposure to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Researchers said that the gulf populations of tunas, amberjack, swordfish, billfish, and other fishes that hatched in oiled surface habitats were largely affected.

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March 26 2014

Pesticides make the life of earthworms miserable


Pesticides are sprayed on crops to help them grow, but the effect on earthworms living in the soil under the plants is devastating, new research reveals. The worms only grow to half their normal weight and they do not reproduce as well as worms in fields that are not sprayed, a research team reports after having studied earthworms that were exposed to pesticides over generations.

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March 26 2014

Scientists film inside a flying insect


Scientists from the UK and Switzerland have used very intense X-rays to film inside an insect's body as it flies.

The resulting footage - a 3D reconstruction made up of several X-ray snapshots - shows a blowfly's flight motor, the "muscles and hinges" that power flight.

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March 26 2014

Science Compared Every Diet, and the Winner Is Real Food


Researchers asked if one diet could be crowned best in terms of health outcomes. If diet is a set of rigid principles, the answer is a decisive no. In terms of broader guidelines, it's a decisive yes.

Flailing in the swell of bestselling diet books, infomercials for cleanses, and secret tips in glossy magazines, is the credibility of nutrition science.

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March 26 2014

Shock-absorbing 'goo' discovered in bone


New findings show that much of the mineral from which bone is made consists of ‘goo’ trapped between tiny crystals, lubricating and allowing movement. It is this flexibility that stops bones from shattering.

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March 26 2014

Generator uses the human body as an electrode to power portable electronics


It's well-known that the human body is a good conductor of electricity, and now researchers have taken advantage of this fact to create a small generator that uses the body as an electrode to power portable devices without the need for batteries. The "body contact electrode" replaces a grounded electrode that was used in a previous version of the generator, which would have been impractical for portable devices.

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March 26 2014

Space-Based Solar Collectors Could Have a Sunny Future


A cloudy day can really dim the promise of solar energy. But out in orbit, a collector could constantly harvest the sun’s photons. That's the idea being explored at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. And they have a prototype.

One side of the experimental module is covered in a photovoltaic panel that converts sunlight into electricity. In the middle sit electronic circuits that convert the electricity to radio waves. The other side has an antenna to beam the energy down to Earth, where it’s converted back to electricity.

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