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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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October 29 2014

Two genes linked with violent crime


A genetic analysis of almost 900 offenders in Finland has revealed two genes associated with violent crime.

Those with the genes were 13 times more likely to have a history of repeated violent behaviour.


Alt: Murderers May Be Hardwired to Kill

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October 29 2014

Not Everyone Wants to Be Happy


Everyone wants to be happy. It's a fundamental human right. It's associated with all sorts of benefits. We, as a society, spend millions trying to figure out what the key to personal happiness is. There are now even apps to help us turn our frowns upside down. So everyone wants to be happy—right?

Well, maybe not.

A new research paper by Mohsen Joshanloo and Dan Weijers from Victoria University of Wellington, argues that the desire for personal happiness, though knitted into the fabric of American history and culture, is held in less esteem by other cultures.

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October 29 2014

Does having children make us any happier?


The birth of a first and a second child briefly increases the level of their parents’ happiness, but a third does not, according to new research. Those who have children at an older age or who are more educated have a particularly positive response to a first birth. Older parents, between the ages of 35 -- 49, have the strongest happiness gains around the time of birth and stay at a higher level of happiness after becoming parents, the research indicates.

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October 29 2014

Guzzling milk might boost your risk of breaking bones


It's seen as one of life's more wholesome tipples. But drinking milk in large quantities may not be as good for general health and bones as we thought, according to a study of thousands of Swedish people. However, other researchers have criticised the study for raising more questions than it answers.


Alt: Heavy milk drinking may double women’s mortality rates

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October 28 2014

Plants can actually take care of their offspring – here’s how


Plants may not travel around as animals do, but they have evolved many strategies that allow them to cope and make the most of the environment they live in. Examples can be found everywhere. For instance, succulence is the special characteristic that cacti have to store water and then use it as a reserve in their dry habitats. And there are plants that produce seeds that are dispersed by wind, allowing them to travel farther than they could possibly have gone otherwise.

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October 28 2014

Telltale Signs of Life Could Be Deepest Yet


Telltale signs of life have been discovered in rocks that were once 12 miles (20 kilometers) below Earth's surface — some of the deepest chemical evidence for life ever found.

Researchers found carbon isotopes in rocks on Washington state's South Lopez Island that suggest the minerals grew from fluids flush with microbial methane. Methane from living creatures has distinct levels of carbon isotopes that distinguish it from methane gas that arises from rocks. (Isotopes are atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei.).

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October 28 2014

Feathers in flight inspire anti-turbulence technology


Inspired by nature's own anti-turbulence devices – feathers – researchers have developed an innovative system that could spell the end of turbulence on flights.

Researchers from the Unmanned Systems Research Team at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have lodged a provisional patent on the system, which mimics the way feathers help birds detect disturbances in the air.

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October 28 2014

Virus resurrected from 700-year-old caribou dung


Earlier this year, researchers brought an ancient giant virus back to life. Now, they have recovered more viral genetic material—this time from frozen caribou feces. For more than 5 millennia, caribou have grazed shrubs and grasses on ice patches atop the Selwyn Mountains in Canada. The animals congregate on the subarctic ice patches during warm summer seasons to escape heat and biting insects, leaving layers of feces on the ground.

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October 28 2014

To beat malaria and dengue, vaccinate the mosquitoes


If there’s one thing the malaria parasite wants, it’s to get inside the guts of a mosquito. Once there, it releases hundreds of wormlike cells that enter the human body through a bloodsucking bite. Now, scientists have found a way to make mosquitoes much less hospitable to this pathogen, as well as the one that causes dengue: stacking the insect’s gut with killer microbes that wipe out the invaders before they have a chance to cause disease.

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October 28 2014

Virus May Be the Cure for Deadly Honeybee Disease


For honeybees losing their babies to a deadly disease, help may soon be on the way in the form of a virus that attacks bacteria and self-replicates until the job is done.

The disease is called American Foulbrood, a bacteria that kills bee larvae and is highly contagious. Its presence in a hive doesn't harm adult bees, but they can still spread it from hive to hive.


Related: Scientists Discover First ‘Virological Penicillin’

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October 28 2014

Chocolate component reverses memory loss in older people, claims study


Late night cocoa has never looked so appealing. A component of chocolate has been found to reverse age-related memory loss in healthy adults aged 50-69. The rejuvenating effect can be traced to increased blood flow in a specific region of the brain, say the researchers.

This is the first direct link that age-related forgetfulness is caused by changes in a specific part of the brain. It is also the first piece of evidence that memory decline can be reversed by a change in diet.

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October 28 2014

Surgeons transplant heart that had stopped beating


Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a "dead heart".

Donor hearts from adults usually come from people who are confirmed as brain dead but with a heart still beating.

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October 28 2014

Space travel damages sperm cells. Houston, we have a problem


Spending a lot of time in the space may damage sperm cells and can also lead to infertility, reveals a new study.

Researchers at the University of Kansas have found that zero gravity situations in the space can affect male as well as female reproductive organs.


Alt: Space may make astronauts infertile, scientists fear, telegraph.co.uk

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October 28 2014

Giant Sunspot Keeps Firing Off Huge Solar Flares


The largest sunspot observed on the sun in more than 20 years has been firing off powerful solar flares for the past week, and it's still producing strong solar storms.

Today, the huge sunspot erupted with a large solar flare, peaking at around 10:47 a.m. EDT (1447 GMT). The flare caused a strong radio blackout on Earth, according to the National Weather Service's Space Weather Prediction Center. This solar flare is the fourth X-flare (the most powerful kind of solar storms) in as many days.

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October 28 2014

Astronomical Find: Ancient Greek Wine Cup May Show Constellations


A 2,600-year-old two-handled wine cup currently on display at the Lamia Archaeological Museum in Greece has long been thought to depict a random assortment of animals.

But the piece of ancient pottery, called a skyphos,may actually contain one of the earliest Greek depictions of the constellations, a new analysis shows.

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October 28 2014

Tomb of Jesus Christ: Shingo, Japan


The small village of Shingo in Japan’s Aomori Prefecture is known not only for its cattle ranches and yam production, but thanks to one rogue cosmoarcheologist the village is also home to the supposed Tomb of Jesus Christ.

According to apocryphal religious writings known as the Takenouchi Documents, it was not Jesus who was crucified on that bloody Golgotha, but in fact it was his younger brother, Isukiri.

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October 28 2014

Turin shroud was made for medieval Easter ritual, historian says


When it is exhibited next year in Turin, for the first time in five years, 2 million people are expected to pour into the city to venerate a four-metre length of woven cloth as the shroud in which Jesus Christ was wrapped after his crucifixion, and on to which was transferred his ghostly image.

Despite the fact that the cloth was radiocarbon-dated to the 14th century in 1988, an array of theories continue to be presented to support its authenticity – including, this year, the idea from scientists at the Politecnico di Torino that an earthquake in AD 33 may have caused a release of neutrons responsible for the formation of the image.

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