News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  next  >>>

 

February 2 2015

Our Inner Viruses: Forty Million Years In the Making


Each year, billions of people get infected with viruses–with common ones like influenza and cold viruses, and rarer ones like polio and Ebola. The viruses don’t stay all that long inside of us. In most cases, our immune systems wipe them out, except for a few refugees that manage to escape to a new host and keep their species alive. In some cases, the viruses kill their unfortunate hosts, and end their own existence as well. But in some exquisitely rare cases, viruses meld with the genome of their hosts and become part of the genetic legacy their hosts pass down to future generations.


Related: Jumping DNA and the Evolution of Pregnancy

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

How fast was the demise of the dinosaurs?


It’s dark. It’s always dark these days. Lights in the sky burn your eyes, so you keep your face to ground in the hopes that they’ll go away. But they don’t. The air is heavy. Heavy with poisons that make it difficult to breathe. Heavy with foreboding dread. You, my unfortunate friend, are going through a mass extinction!

There have been five periods of mass extinction in the past. These represent major phases in the history of life where we see global reorganisations of ecosystems and their inhabitants.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Fugitive Shipwreck Hunter Captured After 2 Years on the Lam


Tommy Thompson — a famous shipwreck hunter who located a Gold Rush-era wreck, and then became embroiled in a long legal drama over the spoils — has been captured in Florida after more than two years in hiding.

The U.S. Marshals Service announced on Wednesday (Jan. 28) that Thompson and Alison Antekeier, thought to be his girlfriend and assistant, were arrested without incident at the Hilton hotel in Boca Raton, Florida, where they had been living for more than a year using fake identities and paying in cash.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Scientists have grown functioning cerebellum-like brain tissue in the lab


The 3-D cerebellum-like structures appear to function like normal brain tissue, and could one day help to heal people with neurodegenerative diseases and brain damage.

Researchers from Japan have worked out how to make human embryonic stem cells organise themselves into functioning, cerebellum-like brain tissue.


Related: 'Vast majority' of neurosurgeons practice defensive medicine

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Team finds hydrogen production in extreme bacterium


A researcher at Missouri University of Science and Technology has discovered a bacterium that can produce hydrogen, an element that one day could lessen the world's dependence on oil.

Dr. Melanie Mormile, professor of biological sciences at Missouri S&T, and her team discovered the bacterium "Halanaerobium hydrogeninformans" in Soap Lake, Washington. It can "produce hydrogen under saline and alkaline conditions in amounts that rival genetically modified organisms," Mormile says.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

The cold fusion race just heated up


The E-Cat, or Energy Catalyser, is an alleged cold fusion reactor invented by Andrea Rossi. While many researchers claim to have produced small quantities of excess heat using nickel and hydrogen, Rossi claims he can produce kilowatts and his technology is ready for industry. Rossi's claims are far-fetched, but the E-Cat refuses to go away. Now it appears to have been not only verified, but replicated. Should we start taking Rossi seriously?

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Soviet Union collapse 'affected region's wildlife'


The socioeconomic shocks following the collapse of the Soviet Union also affected the region's wildlife, researchers have suggested.

A study of large mammal species in Russia found that most experienced a sharp decline in numbers from 1991.


Related: Urban rabbits downsize to smaller, 'studio' warrens

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Lonely ants die young and hungry


What happens when ants get lonely? They're unable to digest their food properly and walk themselves to an early death, a study has found.

The findings may provide an insight into the negative impact of isolation on a range of social animals, even humans, say scientists.


Related: When attacked, some scorpions discard their stinger—and their anus

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

'Live fast, die young' galaxies lose the gas that keeps them alive


Galaxies can die early because the gas they need to make new stars is suddenly ejected, new research suggests. Most galaxies age slowly as they run out of raw materials needed for growth over billions of years. But a pilot study looking at galaxies that die young has found some might shoot out this gas early on, causing them to redden and kick the bucket prematurely.


Related: Stunning supernova has a bubbly interior

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains


In a teenager, the frontal lobe of the brain, which controls decision-making, is built but not fully insulated — so signals move slowly.

"Teenagers are not as readily able to access their frontal lobe to say, 'Oh, I better not do this,' " Dr. Frances Jensen tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Jensen, who's a neuroscientist and was a single mother of two boys who are now in their 20s, wrote The Teenage Brain to explore the science of how the brain grows — and why teenagers can be especially impulsive, moody and not very good at responsible decision-making.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Saying 'ow' really can ease pain


From birth, we instinctively yelp whenever we are hurt.

Now, scientists say there is a reason behind our spontaneous groans as being vocal helps us tolerate pain.

In a study, 56 people were asked to immerse their hands in painfully cold water.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Here Is What War Looks Like From Space


This image, taken by Expedition 41 aboard the International Space Station, looks like the fine artwork of some extra-terrestrial, but it's actually decades old scarred earth and entrenchments of warfare along the Iraq/Iran border.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Globalization’s first wave wasn’t all positive


150 years ago, the steamship made international trade possible for many countries. Only a few countries benefited from this first wave of globalization, however.

Most ended up worse-off, according to a new study.

This is proof that international trade doesn’t automatically lead to economic prosperity, says Luigi Pascali, a professor of economics in the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) at the University of Warwick.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 2 2015

Here's what the world looks like when you map countries by population


This new cartogram scales each country's geographic area by its population, and it's taught us so much.

Before we begin, you're going to have to click here to access the zoomable, high res version. Because without it, countries like Iceland, Mongolia, and Vanuatu are going to be too tiny to even see.


Related: Why Racism is Bad For Your Health

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 1 2015

Regular Walking Can Help Ease Depression


Moderate-intensity exercise, or even just walking, can improve quality of life for depressed middle-aged women, a large Australian study suggests.

Women who averaged 150 minutes of moderate exercise (golf, tennis, aerobics classes, swimming, or line-dancing) or 200 minutes of walking every week had more energy, socialized more, felt better emotionally, and weren't as limited by their depression when researchers followed up after three years.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 1 2015

Sync your sport to your body clock for a personal best


From diet to running shoes to volcanic crater training, there are lots of ways to maximise sporting performance. For the most committed, there might be another option: timing the activity to suit your body clock.

Natural early risers, or larks, hit peak performance around noon, according to a study that tested elite hockey players at different times of the day. The night owls among them did best at around 7 pm – irrespective of what time they got up that day.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
February 1 2015

Future passwords will use typing style and other ‘cognitive fingerprints’


New password systems could look for physical clues about users instead of relying on passwords or fingerprint sensors.

New technologies are being developed by the US military that could recognise users by the rhythm and speed of their typing or the errors they make, or how they move mice.


Related: These Are The Worst Passwords You Could Have

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default