Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  next

 

March 28 2015

How this vast ancient underground city was accidentally discovered in Turkey


Of all the famed underground cities pockmarking the landscape in Turkey’s Cappadocia region, perhaps the most remarkable is the underground network called Derinkuyu. When swelled to capacity, it could house 20,000 people in its 18 stories of living quarters, shops and escape routes. Today, it’s recognized as one of the jewels of this Turkish archaeological wonderland.


Alt: Massive ancient underground city discovered in Turkey's Nevsehir

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Stone-age Italians defleshed their dead


About 7000 years ago in Italy, early farmers practiced an unusual burial ritual known as “defleshing.” When people died, villagers stripped their bones bare, pulled them apart, and mingled them with animal remains in a nearby cave. The practice was meant to separate the dead from the living, researchers say, writing in the latest issue of the journal Antiquity.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Earliest humans had diverse range of body types, just as we do today


One of the dominant theories of our evolution is that our genus, Homo, evolved from small-bodied early humans to become the taller, heavier and longer legged Homo erectus that was able to migrate beyond Africa and colonise Eurasia.

While we know that small-bodied Homo erectus – averaging less than five foot (152cm) and under 50kg – were living in Georgia in southern Europe by 1.77 million years ago, the timing and geographic origin of the larger body size that we associate with modern humans has, until now, remained unresolved.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Neolithic culture may have kept most men from mating


Studying the varying genetic diversity of different population groups is one method for piecing together the migration history of our species. Many analyses find a bottleneck in non-African populations dating back to around 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. This coincides neatly with the current estimate of the first wave of anatomically modern humans out of Africa. When humans first migrated out of Africa, they created a genetic bottleneck. Because a minority of people migrated, they took a minority of total human genetic diversity with them to the new colonies in Europe and Oceania.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Poisons, plants and Palaeolithic hunters


Dozens of common plants are toxic. Archaeologists have long suspected that our Palaeolithic ancestors used plant poisons to make their hunting weapons more lethal.

Now Dr Valentina Borgia has teamed up with a forensic chemist to develop a technique for detecting residues of deadly substances on archaeological objects.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

A Hallucinogenic Tea Time for Some Brazilian Prisoners


As the night sky enveloped this outpost in Brazil’s Amazon basin, the ceremony at the open-air temple began simply enough.

Dozens of adults and children, all clad in white, stood in a line. A holy man handed each a cup of ayahuasca, a muddy-looking hallucinogenic brew. They gulped it down; some vomited. Hymns were sung. More ayahuasca was consumed. By midnight, the congregants seemed strangely energized. Then the dancing began.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Scientists edge closer to creating rehydrating beer that prevents hangovers


Scientists in Australia are looking to create beer that rehydrates you as you drink – stopping hangovers (or making them far less severe).

Researchers at the Griffith University Menzies Health Institute in Queensland are trying to develop the beer that rehydrates you, but that actually tastes the same as normal beer.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

High-Fat Diet May Alter Behavior And Brain: Gut Bacteria May Increase Anxiety, Impaired Memory


So often we hear about the negative effects of a high-fat diet: The more fatty foods we eat, the more we put ourselves at risk for diseases, such as obesity and heart disease. But do high-fat foods threaten our psyche, too?

A study recently published in the journal Biological Psychiatry hypothesized a high-fat diet produces changes in health and behavior (partly) by altering a person’s gut microbiota. Prior research suggests “alterations in the microbiome may underlie the host’s susceptibility to illness, including neuropsychiatric impairment” — and present researchers decided to put this theory to the test.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Mediterranean Diet is Healthy, Pollutes Less


The Mediterranean diet, a menu traditionally eaten in Spain, leaves less of a carbon footprint than that of the U.S. or the United Kingdom, according to a recent study.

The consequences of climate change range from species extinction to sea-level increases and the spread of diseases. For this reason, researchers have been struggling for years to alleviate its effects, even limiting the pollution caused by food consumption.


Related: Fit middle-aged men 'at lower risk for some cancers'

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Agricultural waste could be used as biofuel


Straw-powered cars could be a thing of the future thanks to new research. A new study pinpoints five strains of yeast capable of turning agricultural by-products, such as straw, sawdust and corncobs, into bioethanol -- a well-known alcohol-based biofuel.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Water 'could warm a million homes in England'


A million properties across England could in future be heated by water from rivers, canals and the sea, the government says.

The Department for Energy calculates this is the potential of a technology known as the water source heat pump.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

'Ice vault' idea to keep climate's time capsule intact


Imagine you are Sherlock Holmes bent on solving a mystery but the evidence is starting to crumble and eventually you will be left with worthless dust.

This is the worry which haunts ice scientists delving into Earth's threatened glaciers.

Deep inside them, the slumbering ice slabs hold information about Earth's climate past, and pointers for the future.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Critters found in Antarctic ice show how tenacious life is


Deep below the ice, far from the playful penguins and other animals that bring tourists to Antarctica, is a cold and barren world that by all indications should be completely void of life.

But recently, scientists researching melting ice watched a half-foot-long (15-centimeter) fish swim by. Not long after that, they saw shrimp-like creatures.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Giant pandas' secret social life revealed


Everyone needs friends. Even giant pandas. It turns out that they are more sociable than we thought, hanging out together for weeks at a time.

We know very little about wild pandas because they are so rare and live in almost impenetrable forest. But in 2010 and 2011, Vanessa Hull of Michigan State University and her colleagues were given permission to attach GPS tracking collars to five pandas in the Wolong National Nature Reserve in China.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Bats obey 'traffic rules' when trawling for food


Foraging bats obey their own set of 'traffic rules', chasing, turning and avoiding collisions at high speed, new research from the University of Bristol, UK has found.

Dr Marc Holderied of Bristol's School of Biological Sciences studied pairs of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) foraging low over water for stranded insects at a site near the village of Barrow Gurney in Somerset, UK.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 28 2015

Granddaddy of All Lobsters, Butterflies, Spiders Found


A marine creature that lived 508 million years ago and gave rise to today’s butterflies, spiders and lobsters has been identified and virtually recreated.

The new species, Yawunik kootenayi, lived more than 250 million years before the first dinosaurs. It is described in the latest issue of the journal Paleontology.

“This creature is expanding our perspective on the anatomy and predatory habits of the first arthropods, the group to which spiders and lobsters belong,”.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
March 27 2015

The father of all humans lived 239,000 years ago


By sequencing the genomes of 2,636 Icelanders — the largest set ever obtained from a single population — researchers were able to identify that genetic mutations play a role in everything from Alzheimer’s disease to liver disease. The Icelandic data also suggest that humanity’s most recent common male ancestor, the "father" of us all, would have lived between 174,000 and 321,000 years ago.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page:  <<<  prev  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  next

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default