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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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June 7 2015

Bees 'may be developing form of animal Alzheimer's'


Bees may be developing a kind of animal Alzheimer's disease because of exposure to aluminium in the environment, scientists have suggested.


Related: Bee warned – Study finds pesticides threaten native pollinators

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June 7 2015

Fake orca used to scare sea lions out of Oregon port


Port officials in an Oregon city have gone to creative lengths to see off hundreds of sea lions from their docks - by shipping in a fake orca whale.

The 32ft-long fibreglass whale was brought to rid Astoria's port of the sea lions after they failed to leave as expected once the weather got warmer.

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June 7 2015

Seven new species of miniature frogs discovered in cloud forests of Brazil


Seven new species of miniature frog, smaller than bumblebees, have been discovered clinging to survival on isolated mountaintops in Brazil.

The largest of the new discoveries has a maximum adult length of just 13mm. The frogs, which are among the smallest land vertebrates, have evolved with fewer fingers and toes in order to reduce their size.

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June 7 2015

Study shows African savannah able to support large number of herbivores due to distinct diets


A team of researchers with affiliations to Princeton University and the Smithsonian Institution has found what they believe to be the answer to how it is that the African savannah is able to support such a wide variety of herbivores. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their field study, their analysis of their findings and what it may mean for conservation efforts in Africa.

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June 6 2015

Monkeys' cosy alliance with wolves looks like domestication


In the alpine grasslands of eastern Africa, Ethiopian wolves and gelada monkey are giving peace a chance. The geladas – a type of a baboon – tolerate wolves wandering right through the middle of their troops, while the wolves ignore potential meals of baby geladas in favour of rodents, which they can catch more easily when the monkeys are present.

The unusual pact echoes the way dogs began to be domesticated by humans.

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June 6 2015

Rats might not be such rats after all, say scientists


Are animals more human than we thought? Or is it humans who are more animal-like?

Scientists are moving toward a startling conclusion: humans can no longer claim that they are the only ones with an elevated sense of morality. For instance, studies have found that chimpanzees will give food to one another when given the opportunity. So will dogs.

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June 6 2015

2,000-Year-Old Natural Pearl Found


Australian scientists said Wednesday they have uncovered a “very rare” 2,000-year-old natural sea pearl — the first found on the vast island continent — while excavating a remote coastal Aboriginal site.

Archaeologists were working the site on the north Kimberley coast of Western Australia when they came across the unique gem below the surface, said Kat Szabo, an associate professor at the University of Wollongong.

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June 6 2015

Connecticut Researchers Uncover 12,000-Year-Old Artifacts


Researchers said a set of newly discovered 12,000-year-old artifacts in southeastern Connecticut is one of the oldest in New England.

The site located at Mashantucket Pequot Reservation was occupied by the Paleoindians and it is the fourth and oldest Paleoindian site found on tribal lands.

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June 6 2015

Archaeologists discover evidence of prehistoric gold trade route


Archaeologists at the University of Southampton have found evidence of an ancient gold trade route between the south-west of the UK and Ireland. A study suggests people were trading gold between the two countries as far back as the early Bronze Age (2500BC).

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June 6 2015

Santo Domingo geoglyphs still in danger from invaders


The destruction of a 600-year-old geoglyph in Trujillo made headlines in April after agricultural invaders attempted to erase the structure to make room for crops.

Since the incident was discovered investigators have searched the region to find out that hundreds in the area have been destroyed and remain in danger.

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June 6 2015

Mayan ancestry may help explain the high risk of diabetes in Mexico


Mexico has one of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the world, with 12% of the population suffering from the condition, compared with 9% of people in the United States. The Mexican government is so worried that it recently declared a state of emergency and introduced a tax on soda and junk food. But a new study shows that some Mexicans may be at higher risk for developing diabetes, no matter how healthy their diets are. The reason may be their Maya ancestry, which carries with it genetic variations associated with the disease.

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June 6 2015

How your eyes betray your thoughts


Research published last year shows that pupil dilation is linked to the degree of uncertainty during decision-making: if somebody is less sure about their decision, they feel heightened arousal, which causes the pupils to dilate. This change in the eye may also reveal what a decision-maker is about to say: one group of researchers, for example, found that watching for dilation made it possible to predict when a cautious person used to saying ‘no’ was about to make the tricky decision to say ‘yes’. Watching the eyes can even help predict what number a person has in mind.

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June 6 2015

Poor children more generous than their rich counterparts, study finds


An altruism experiment found that four-year-olds from less well-off families donated more of their prize than their wealthy peers

Even as four-year-olds, poor people are more generous than their richer counterparts, an altruism experiment suggests.

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June 6 2015

The Flexibility of Racial Bias


Research suggests that racism is not hard wired, offering hope on one of America’s enduring problems

The city of Baltimore was rocked by protests and riots over the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old African American man who died in police custody. Tragically, Gray’s death was only one of a recent in a series of racially-charged, often violent, incidents.

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June 6 2015

Listening to Mozart can boost your memory: Classical composer's music increases brain wave activity


Listening to Mozart can give your brain a boost, according to a new study.

People who heard the classical composer's music showed an increase in brain wave activity linked to memory, understanding and problem-solving, researchers found.

However, no such increases were found after the group listened to Beethoven, suggesting there is something specific about the effect of Mozart's music on our minds, they said.

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June 6 2015

Health Check: can your brain be ‘full’?


The brain is truly a marvel. A seemingly endless library, whose shelves house our most precious memories as well as our lifetime’s knowledge. But is there a point where it reaches capacity? In other words, can the brain be “full”?

The answer is a resounding no, because, well, brains are more sophisticated than that. A study published in Nature Neuroscience earlier this year shows that instead of just crowding in, old information is sometimes pushed out of the brain for new memories to form.

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June 6 2015

Scientists discover a protein that silences the biological clock


A new study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers has found that a protein associated with cancer cells is a powerful suppressor of the biological clock that drives the daily ("circadian") rhythms of cells throughout the body. The discovery, published in the June 4 issue of Molecular Cell (and online now), adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting a link between cancer and disruption of circadian rhythms, while offering new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the biological clock.

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