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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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January 4 2015

Mid-Norway Vikings among the first to sail to British Isles


Archaeological findings show that Vikings from mid- and western Norway were among the first to make the trip to the British Isles.

Vikings living in Trøndelag, a region in the middle part of Norway, were among the first in Scandinavia to travel west.

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January 4 2015

Byzantine shipwrecks reveal advanced shipbuilding techniques


A trove of ancient Byzantine ships found in waters near Istanbul, Turkey, displayed more advanced construction than scholars previously knew for that era. The ships include two unique Byzantine galleys propelled by oars, which are the first of their kind to be salvaged and were previously known only from text and images.

Officials are planning a large museum to show the ships, which date back between 800 and 1,500 years, but it may be several years before their hulls are prepared to the point that they may be exhibited.

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January 4 2015

Mayan Civilization Declined and Ultimately Died Due to Long Droughts


New research centered on the world famous "Blue Hole" in Belize suggests the ancient Mayan civilization died out due to a massively long drought.

According to Live Science, researchers found minerals in the underwater cave that indicated a past drought that lasted for approximately 100 years, from 800 A.D. to 900 A.D. For the past several centuries, the Mayans were prospering on the Yucatan Peninsula, but their decline began in 700 A.D.

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January 3 2015

China's Remote Fortresses Lose Residents, Gain Tourists


Massive earthen structures once sheltered clans from warlords and bandits. Can they be prototypes for "green" buildings?

It started like a game. How many of these strange, fortress-like structures could I tally from a vehicle window? They were so big, looming like spaceships in the countryside of Fujian Province in southeastern China. Every village seemed to have at least one, two, more.

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January 3 2015

Bird carcasses along Pacific shore baffle biologists


The carcasses of thousands of small birds called Cassin's auklets have been washing ashore over the last few months from Northern California up to the north coast of Washington.

Scientists along the Pacific Coast have been trying to determine what is causing the large die-off of the birds this winter.

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January 3 2015

Guide for healthy eating may consider environment


The government issues dietary guidelines every five years to encourage Americans to eat healthier. This year's version may look at what is healthy for the environment, too.

A new focus on the environment would mean asking people to choose more fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and other plant-based foods—possibly at the expense of meat.

The beef and agriculture industries are crying foul, saying an environmental agenda has no place in what has always been a practical blueprint for a healthy lifestyle.

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January 3 2015

Skin Fat Helps Protect Against Infections, Study Finds


Fat cells just under a person's skin may be the first responders to invading bacteria, buying time until the white blood cells arrive at a wound site, according to a new study.

The new findings suggest that the task of fighting infections is not solely the responsibility of the immune system, the researchers said. Moreover, fat cells may fight infections by producing antimicrobial compounds, lab experiments in mice and human fat cells showed.

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January 3 2015

Year of birth significantly changes impact of obesity-associated gene variant


Investigators working to unravel the impact of genetics versus environment on traits such as obesity may also need to consider a new factor: when individuals were born. A new study finds that the impact of a variant in the FTO gene that previous research has linked to obesity risk largely depends on birth year, with no correlation between gene variant and obesity in study participants born in earlier years and a far stronger correlation than previously reported for those born in later years.

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January 3 2015

Surprise! The most important skill in science or self-improvement is noticing the unexpected


If I could ensure that kids come away from science class with one thing only, it wouldn’t be a set of facts. It would be an attitude—something that the late physicist Richard Feynman called “scientific integrity,” the willingness to bend over backward to examine reasons your pet theories about the world might be wrong. “That is the idea that we all hope you have learned in studying science in school,” Feynman said in a 1974 commencement speech. “We never say explicitly what this is, but just hope that you catch on by all the examples of scientific investigation.”

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January 3 2015

Personalised learning lets children study at their own pace


THE teachers at Summit Public Schools in California don't stand in front of the class and deliver the same lesson. In fact, they don't teach lessons at all. Instead, semi-autonomous software guides children through the syllabus, with a teacher on hand to answer questions and explain more complicated concepts.

The idea is that children work best when setting their own goals and moving at a pace that suits them. Evidence from early pilot studies shows that pupils learn more effectively this way than with traditional teaching.

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January 3 2015

Scientists explain how stem cells and 'bad luck' cause cancer


Why are some types of cancer so much more common than others? Sometimes it’s due to faulty genes inherited from one’s parents and sometimes to behaviors like smoking a pack of cigarettes every day. But in most cases, it comes down to something else – stem cells.

This is the intriguing argument made by a pair of researchers from Johns Hopkins University. In a study published Friday in the journal Science, they found a very high correlation between the differences in risk for 31 kinds of cancer and the frequency with which different types of stem cells made copies of themselves.

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January 3 2015

Innate behavior determines how we steer our car


Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have solved a 70 year old mystery in traffic research: an until now inexplicable jerkiness when we steer a vehicle. The discovery may lead to safety systems in cars that can correct dangerous steering movements before they occur.

The ability to predict what a driver is going to do in the near future and to be able to prepare the car's system for this sounds a little bit like science fiction, and it would naturally be a dream come true for the safety departments at car manufacturers. The dream is now one step closer to becoming reality.

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January 3 2015

3D wall immerses you in an earthquake


Feel like experiencing an earthquake? The VuePod can take you there. It is a curved wall of 12 large, high-definition, 3D televisions, and the visuals it displays can be navigated with a Wii controller.

The immersive system, designed by Dan Ames at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and a team of students, was created to allow environmental engineers to make virtual site visits. It uses 3D lidar data, captured at sites of interest during extreme weather events, to let researchers experience the effect of natural disasters.

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January 3 2015

SHOULD WE SEND MEN TO VENUS INSTEAD OF MARS?


When it comes to manned spaceflight, a manned mission to Mars has been the ultimate goal since the 1960s; after the Moon, it's the most logical place to go. But what about Venus?

We can't land on the surface of Venus. At least, it would be almost impossibly difficult to design a spacecraft that could survive the planet's hellish environment. With a carbon dioxide rich atmosphere at a pressure about 92 times what we feel on Earth and an average surface temperatures upwards of 900 degrees Fahrenheit, it's not a welcoming environment. But about 31 miles above the surface, Venus becomes almost Earthlike.

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January 3 2015

'Super-powered oven' suggests Venus once had continents


VENUS is Earth's bad-tempered and secretive twin. Despite being similar to Earth in size and mass, Venus is a noxious pressure cooker with surface temperatures that can melt lead. What's more, it hides its surface in perpetual clouds of sulphuric acid – despite decades of spacecraft visits, no one really knows what Venus's surface rocks are made of.

That's beginning to change, thanks to a powerful oven in a lab in Germany. Jörn Helbert at the DLR Institute for Planetary Research in Berlin and colleagues have used it to make the first analogue studies of Venus's surface. The results could help explain how Earth's twin went bad.

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January 3 2015

Big Bang to Be Investigated From Balloon in Antarctica


Cosmologists celebrated the new year by launching a new experiment on a balloon in Antarctica to investigate the Big Bang.

A set of six telescopes known as Spider, for Suborbital Polarimeter for Inflation, Dust and the Epoch of Reionization, will circle the continent for the next 20 days, observing a haze of faint microwave radio waves that envelop space and are thought to be the fading remnants of the primordial fireball in which it all started 13.8 billion years ago.

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January 3 2015

Study identifies prevalence of rickets among 16th century sailors


The bones of sailors who sailed on Henry VIII’s Mary Rose ship have been analysed with the help of new laser technology to identify evidence of bone disease.

The famous vessel sank in battle on the 19 July 1545, resulting in over 400 men losing their lives. The environment of the Solent meant that the ship and the sailors were preserved in silt, which helped to keep them in remarkably good condition..

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