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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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June 10 2015

America's First 'Casino' Found in Utah Cave


Long before Las Vegas, people were apparently gambling in what might be America’s first casino — a cave on the shore of Utah’s Great Salt Lake.

Archaeologists exploring the site, known simply as Cave 1, have unearthed hundreds of carved sticks, hoops, dice and darts dating back to about 700 years ago. They believe there could be up to 10,000 gambling pieces in the cave.

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June 10 2015

Bronze Arrowhead Embedded In Spine Shows Elite Iron Age Warrior Survived Battle


In an elite Early Iron Age burial from central Kazakhstan, the remains of an early Scythian nomad came to light. The bones were scattered and some had disappeared over the millennia, but when archaeologists put the pieces back together, they noticed something few researchers have seen before: a metal arrowhead wedged into the spine.

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June 10 2015

Ancient skeletons from Lake Titicaca reveal history of brutal brawls


The Copacabana Peninsula may be a magnet for adventurous holiday makers today, but it was a far more bloodthirsty place more than 1,000 years ago.

The landmass jutting out into Lake Titicaca in Bolivia was home to a group of people who seem to have fought with each other frequently.

Skeletons in the region have revealed signs of violence such as broken bones, but holes in the skulls also suggest the ancient culture conducted cranial surgery in a bid to save lives.

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June 10 2015

New theory identifies height-to-base ratio that helped humanity master fire and migrate the globe


From ancient Egyptians roasting a dripping cut of beef next to the Great Pyramid of Giza to a Boy Scout learning to build a log cabin fire in his backyard, everyone builds fires with the same general shape. And now we know why.

In a study published in Scientific Reports on June 8, Adrian Bejan, the J.A. Jones professor of mechanical engineering at Duke University, shows that, all other variables being equal, the best fires are roughly as tall as they are wide.

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June 10 2015

Massive Irish Elk Survived the Mass Extinction of the Last Ice Age


It turns out that giant deer were still present in Britain at the end of the last Ice Age. While many animal species became extinct, the giant deer, or Irish elk, was still around during that time period.

Researchers still don't the precise reasons for the extinction of so many species; it probably took place due to a combination of climate change and hunting by humans. However, some species of animals survived the end of the last glacial period somewhat longer than others.


Related: Giant deer were still present in Southern Germany after the Ice Age

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June 9 2015

What rabbits can tell us about Neanderthal extinction


When thinking about the extinction of Neanderthals some 30,000 years ago, rabbits may not be the first thing that spring to mind. But the way rabbits were hunted and eaten by Neanderthals and modern humans -- or not, as the case may be -- may offer vital clues as to why one species died out while the other flourished.

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June 9 2015

Chimpanzees may know when they are right and move to prove it


Chimpanzees are capable of metacognition, or thinking about one's own thinking, and can adjust their behavior accordingly, researchers at Georgia State University, Agnes Scott College, Wofford College and the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York have discovered.

Their findings, published June 6 in the journal Cognition, suggest chimpanzees share with humans the capacity for metacognitive monitoring, which reflects a form of cognitive control that underlies intelligent decision-making across species.

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June 9 2015

Crows count on 'number neurons'


Neurobiologists have discovered cells in the crow brain that respond to a specific number of items. The study provides valuable insights into the biological roots of counting capabilities. What makes this finding even more interesting is that a long evolutionary history separates us from birds; as a consequence, the brains of crows and humans are designed very differently.

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June 9 2015

The Circle That Gives Fruit Flies Direction


When researchers found a group of brain cells in the fruit fly that function like a compass, they were very satisfied. They had found what they were looking for.

But, said Vivek Jayaraman, when he and Johannes D. Seelig realized that the cells were actually arranged in a physical circle in the brain, so they looked just like a compass, they were taken aback.

“It’s kind of like a cosmic joke that they are arranged like that,” he said.

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June 9 2015

Surgeon who has performed 1,000 head transplants on mice wants first head-transplanted monkey


Not content with having created over 1,000 hybrid mice with different heads, some a different colour from their bodies, controversial doctor Xiaoping Ren next wants to perform pioneering transplants on primates.

Shadowing him during a 10-hour operation, the Wall Street Journal witnessed a mouse with a new head move and breathe on its own following the procedure, even opening its eyes and drinking.

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June 9 2015

Car to driver: We're not moving with that blood alcohol


Inventing a world without drunk driving would make life safer for everyone. A path leading to better driver safety is under way. An alcohol detection system for driver safety comes by way of a research program. The Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) has been on a mission to advance alcohol detection technology in vehicles.

They have been at work on a safety feature to protect against drunk driving. Their system is designed to measure the alcohol in a driver's blood in less than a second.

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June 9 2015

Children learn to write by teaching robots


Researchers in Switzerland have designed a system where children teach robot students how to write, and in the process improve their own handwriting skills. This learning by teaching paradigm, they say, could engage unmotivated students as well as boost their self-confidence.

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June 9 2015

Prosthetic that simulates touch: Nerve endings wired to sensors create the 'feeling' of a real limb


Amputees will soon be able to 'feel' using their artificial limbs thanks to a breakthrough in prosthesis.

The technology wires remaining nerve endings to healthy tissue in the leg or arm and then uses sensors to simulate the sensation of touch.

When the wearer applies pressure, these sensors send signals to the brain - and the researchers said the breakthrough could also fight phantom pain often experienced by amputees.

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June 9 2015

Want to relax? Listen to Verdi, scientists say


If you want to relax and feel calm then the scientific tip is to listen to the music of the Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi, which is more likely to lower blood pressure than pop, rock or jazz.

According to new research, slow music with a 10-second repetitive cycle has a noticeable calming effect on listeners because it matches the body’s natural 10-second waves of blood-pressure control.

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June 9 2015

How Dancing Can Boosts Brain Cells and Lifelong Learning


Merely art? Recreation? Dance may be the Cinderella of education. About 400 studies related to interdisciplinary 21st-century neuroscience lead to the discovery that there is a hidden value to dance education for young and old alike.

Dance is a language of physical exercise that sparks new brain cells (neurogenesis) and their connections that are responsible for acquiring knowledge and thinking.

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June 9 2015

Lost Posture: Why Some Indigenous Cultures May Not Have Back Pain


Back pain is a tricky beast. Most Americans will at some point have a problem with their backs. And for an unlucky third, treatments won't work, and the problem will become chronic.

Believe it or not, there are a few cultures in the world where back pain hardly exists. One indigenous tribe in central India reported essentially none. And the discs in their backs showed little signs of degeneration as people aged.

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June 9 2015

Are You the 5 Percent? Small Minority Have No Health Problems


If you're in perfect health, you're in the minority: Less than 5 percent of people worldwide had no health problems in 2013, a new study finds.


Alt: Over 95% of the world’s population has health problems, with over a third having more than five ailments

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