News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  next  >>>

 

June 26 2014

Source of Disco Clam's Flash Psyches Out Scientists


As mollusks go, Ctenoides ales is quite literally one of the flashiest. A native of the Indo-Pacific region, the creature is known as the disco clam because the soft tissues of its ‘lips’ flash like a mirror ball above a dance floor. A study published today finds that the disco clam achieves this using nanoparticles of silica to reflect light.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Butterflies use magnetic compass to fly across America


The monarch butterfly uses a magnetic compass to guide its extraordinary migration thousands of km across North America, scientists say.

Monarchs are known to possess a Sun compass but even on cloudy days they still keep flying south towards Mexico.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Older Moms May Live Longer


For women, being able to have children naturally later in life may be a sign that they will live an unusually long time, according to new research.

The link between the ability to give birth at older ages and longevity may be explained by genetic traits that facilitate both, the researchers said.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Meet Kodomoroid, Japan's android newsreader


Tokyo: Japanese scientists have unveiled what they say is the world's first news-reading android, eerily lifelike and possessing a sense of humour to match her perfect language skills.

The adolescent-looking "Kodomoroid" - an amalgamation of the Japanese word "kodomo" [child] and "android" - delivered news of an earthquake and an FBI raid to amazed reporters in Tokyo.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

First demonstration of a self-powered cardiac pacemaker


A self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker that is operated semi-permanently by a flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator has been developed by researchers. The team's newly designed flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator directly stimulated a living rat's heart using electrical energy converted from the small body movements of the rat. This technology could facilitate the use of self-powered flexible energy harvesters, not only prolonging the lifetime of cardiac pacemakers but also realizing real-time heart monitoring.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Breakthrough in solar panel manufacture promises cheap energy within a decade


A breakthrough in the production of solar cells will make the next generation of solar panels cheaper and safer, and promises to accelerate the development of solar energy over the next decade, scientists said.

A technical advance based on an edible salt used in the manufacture of tofu could revolutionise the production of future solar panels to make them less expensive, more flexible and easier to use than the current models seen on millions of roofs across Britain.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Scientists create new battery that's cheap, clean, rechargeable... and organic


Scientists at USC have developed a water-based organic battery that is long lasting, built from cheap, eco-friendly components.

The new battery – which uses no metals or toxic materials – is intended for use in power plants, where it can make the energy grid more resilient and efficient by creating a large-scale means to store energy for use as needed.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

In Austria, heat is 'recycled' from the sewer


Vast amounts of hot water from household appliances, businesses and factories gurgle down the drain every day, wasting not only H2O but also another precious resource: heat energy.

Not, however, in the Austrian town of Amstetten, where a pilot project by the local utility company is "recycling" this energy from a place where normally few dare to tread—the sewer.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Africa's poison 'apple' provides common ground for saving elephants, raising livestock


While African wildlife often run afoul of ranchers and pastoralists securing food and water resources for their animals, the interests of fauna and farmer might finally be unified by the "Sodom apple," a toxic invasive plant that has overrun vast swaths of East African savanna and pastureland.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 26 2014

Food really does taste better when it looks good, scientists claim


Scientists have finally proved that food tastes better when it looks good – and the trick even works on salad.

An abstract painting was used as the model by psychologists testing the theory.

People preferred the flavour of the artistic dish over the same ingredients jumbled together or placed neatly but uncreatively on a plate.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

Music Changes the Way You Think


Hum the first two notes of “The Simpsons” theme song. (If you’re not a Simpsons fan, “Maria” from West Side Story will also do.) The musical interval you’re hearing—the pitch gap between the notes—is known as a “tritone,” and it’s commonly recognized in music theory as one of the most dissonant intervals, so much so that composers and theorists in the 18th century dubbed it diabolus in musica (“devil in music”).

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

Why Icelanders are wary of elves living beneath the rocks


Plans to build a new road in Iceland ran into trouble recently when campaigners warned that it would disturb elves living in its path. Construction work had to be stopped while a solution was found.

From his desk at the Icelandic highways department in Reykjavik, Petur Matthiasson smiles at me warmly from behind his glasses, but firmly.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

Mysterious Earthen 'Mima' Mounds Created by Plants, Not Animals


In the prairies of Washington, hundreds of large, vegetation-topped mounds — dubbed mima mounds — cover the landscape in a seemingly non-random pattern. Over the years, scientists have proposed numerous theories to explain these and other mimalike mounds across the globe, the most popular of which implicate animals, particularly gophers and termites, for the pimply blemishes.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

Insecticides put world food supplies at risk, say scientists


The world’s most widely used insecticides have contaminated the environment across the planet so pervasively that global food production is at risk, according to a comprehensive scientific assessment of the chemicals’ impacts.

The researchers compare their impact with that reported in Silent Spring, the landmark 1962 book by Rachel Carson that revealed the decimation of birds and insects by the blanket use of DDT and other pesticides and led to the modern environmental movement.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

Two new articles on GrahamHancock.com


[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

How Did This Ancient Civilization Avoid War for 2,000 Years?


The Harappan civilization dominated the Indus River valley beginning about five thousand years ago, its massive cities sprawling at the edges of rivers that still flow through Pakistan and India today. But its culture remains a mystery. Why did it leave behind no representations of great leaders, nor of warfare?

Archaeologists have long wondered whether the Harappan civilization could actually have thrived for roughly 2,000 years without any major wars or leadership cults.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
June 25 2014

2,500-Year-Old Greek Statues Sparkle After Facelift


Four marble maidens from ancient Greece have just gotten a facelift. Using a specially designed laser, conservators have labored since 2011 to strip away the black grime that encrusted the statues. Today the final figure to undergo the treatment is being revealed in all her splendor in the new Acropolis Museum in Athens, which celebrates its fifth anniversary this Friday, June 20.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default