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February 23 2015

Lost Sherlock Holmes story discovered


A long-lost Sherlock Holmes story has been rediscovered more than a hundred years after it was first published.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the story, titled Sherlock Homes: Discovering the Border Burghs and, by deduction, the Brig Bazaar, in 1904 to raise money for a bridge in Selkirk, Scotland.

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February 23 2015

Dead for 48 minutes, Catholic Priest claims God is female


A Catholic priest from Massachussetts was officially dead for more than 48 minutes before medics were able to miraculously re-start his heart has revealed a shocking revelation.

The 71-year-old cleric Father John Micheal O’neal claims he went to heaven and met God, which he describes as a warm and comforting motherly figure.


Related: 'When I woke up, I was a baby and you named me Luke': Mom claims her five-year- old son remembers his past life as a Chicago woman who died in a house fire

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February 23 2015

The Quantum Mechanics of Fate - How time travel might explain some of science’s biggest puzzles


“The objective world simply is, it does not happen,” wrote mathematician and physicist Hermann Weyl in 1949. From his point of view, the universe is laid out in time as surely as it is laid out in space. Time does not pass, and the past and future are as real as the present. If your common sense rebels against this idea, it is probably for a single reason: the arrow of causality. Events in the past cause events in the present which cause events in the future. If time really is like space, then shouldn’t events from the future influence the present and past, too?

They actually might.

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February 23 2015

Mars One Finalist: “I Could Sow the Seeds of a New Civilization”


I have always been in awe of the night sky, trying to comprehend the vastness of space and the countless wonders it contains. But I have always felt a certain dissatisfaction with only being able to see it at a distance.

One day I imagine that humanity will be able to visit other planets in the solar system, and venture even further to other stars, but this has always seemed very far away. That’s the reason why I applied for the Mars One mission.


Related: Should we give up on the dream of space elevators?

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February 23 2015

The controversy over interstellar messaging


Should we beam messages into deep space, announcing our presence to any extraterrestrial civilizations that might be out there? Or, should we just listen? Since the beginnings of the modern Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), radio astronomers have, for the most part, followed the listening strategy. In 1999, that consensus was shattered. Without consulting with other members of the community of scientists involved in SETI, a team of radio astronomers at the Evpatoria Radar Telescope in Crimea, led by Alexander Zaitsev, beamed an interstellar message called 'Cosmic Call' to four nearby sun-like stars.

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February 23 2015

Scientists Plan to Hunt for Alien Life on Europa


Are we truly alone in the universe? Or is Earth just one of many inhabited worlds? These are some of the most fascinating questions facing humanity, and soon, thanks to a 2016 federal budget allocation for a mission to Jupiter's moon Europa, NASA may be able to help answer them.

Now, in a move that has astrobiology researchers buzzing in excitement, the 2016 federal budget request includes funds for the first phase of a Europa mission. NASA administrators are optimistic that such a mission will happen—even though it might not launch until the 2020s.

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February 23 2015

Black hole's blast stunts birth of stars


Winds blasted out by the giant black holes found at the centre of galaxies are strong enough to stunt the birth of new stars, astronomers have found.

By training two space telescopes on a supermassive black hole with the mass of a billion Suns, they measured the strength of its ferocious winds.

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February 22 2015

Planets can alter each other's climates over eons


A new study sheds light on how exoplanets in tightly-packed solar systems interact with each other gravitationally by affecting one another's climates and their abilities to support alien life.

Because the exoplanets are so close to one another in these compact solar systems, they have tidal influence, much like the Earth and the Moon have on each other. The tides modify the spin rates, axial tilts and orbits of these planets over time, and therefore alter their climates.

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February 22 2015

The idea of two sexes is simplistic. Biologists now think there is a wider spectrum than that


As a clinical geneticist, Paul James is accustomed to discussing some of the most delicate issues with his patients. But in early 2010, he found himself having a particularly awkward conversation about sex.

A 46-year-old pregnant woman had visited his clinic at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Australia to hear the results of an amniocentesis test to screen her baby's chromosomes for abnormalities.

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February 22 2015

Olive oil compound kills cancer in minutes


An ingredient in extra-virgin olive oil kills a variety of human cancer cells without harming healthy ones.

Scientists knew that oleocanthal killed some cancer cells, but weren’t really sure how.


Related: Popular soda ingredient, caramel color, poses cancer risk to consumers

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February 22 2015

How the sun can damage your skin even in the dark


The damage the sun inflicts on your skin may be even more insidious than was previously thought, according to new research.

A study published Thursday in Science finds that the effects of sun exposure can continue to wreak havoc on your DNA -- even in the dark.

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February 22 2015

Mystery of robins' nighttime singing probed


A new project at Glasgow University aims to help resolve why robins are up all night singing in cities.

Dr Davide Dominoni believes that city lights convince the birds there is no end to the day.

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February 22 2015

Extremely Rare Fox Seen in Yosemite—First Time in 100 Years


One of the rarest animals in North America, the Sierra Nevada red fox, has been caught on camera in California's Yosemite National Park for the first time in nearly a century.

Motion-sensitive cameras stationed in the northern part of the park captured two images—possibly of the same animal—one in December and one in January.

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February 22 2015

Smelly caterpillar dresses as snake to avoid predators


Is it a snake? No, it's a caterpillar in disguise, sporting fake eyes and a counterfeit forked tongue. When erected, as seen in this photo, the bright, double-pronged protrusion secretes smelly chemicals to repel predators.


Related: Pumas Kill More, Eat Less When Humans Are Near
Related: Great White Sharks Are Late Bloomers

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February 22 2015

Forgotten fossil found to be new species of ichthyosaur


A fossil stored in a Doncaster museum for 30 years and thought to be a plaster copy has turned out to be a new species of ancient reptile.

A young palaeontologist working with the University of Manchester found the fossil in 2008, in the collections of Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery.


Related: How Did Long-Necked Dinosaurs Drink Without Getting Dizzy?

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February 22 2015

Did dark matter kill the dinosaurs?


Every so often, the fossil record shows, ecological disasters wipe large numbers of species off the face of Earth. These mass extinctions occur roughly every 26 million to 30 million years—about the same interval at which our solar system passes through the plane of the Milky Way. Putting two and two together, some researchers have proposed that clouds of dust and gas in the galactic plane might disrupt the orbits of far-flung comets and trigger planet-smacking collisions. A new study suggests an additional culprit may lie behind those times of woe: dark matter.

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February 22 2015

Plants survive better through mass extinctions than animals


At least 5 mass extinction events have profoundly changed the history of life on Earth. But a new study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg shows that plants have been very resilient to those events.

For over 400 million years, plants have played an essential role in almost all terrestrial environments and covered most of the world’s surface. During this long history, many smaller and a few major periods of extinction severely affected Earth’s ecosystems and its biodiversity.

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