News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  next  >>>

 

July 13 2014

Obesity: We're not overeating, we're under-exercising, study suggests


A new study suggests that under-exercising, rather than overeating, may be at the heart of America's obesity epidemic.

Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine report a strong correlation between the rise in obesity and a striking drop in the amount of time Americans spend exercising when not at work over the last 22 years.


Related: Exercise is the best medicine, study shows

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 13 2014

Growing up on livestock farm halves risk of inflammatory bowel diseases


The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases is rising sharply -- particularly among young people. However, new research indicates that growing up on a livestock farm may have a protective effect. "It is extremely exciting that we can now see that not only allergic diseases, but also more classic inflammatory diseases appear to depend on the environment we are exposed to early in our lives," says one expert.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 13 2014

Monsanto’s ‘Roundup’ weedkiller may be causing kidney failure in farmworkers: study


Researchers looking into the cause of a chronic kidney disease epidemic which has devastated farm-workers in Central America, India and Sri Lanka may have found their culprit in a commonly-used herbicide manufactured by Monsanto, according to Truthout.

According to a study conducted by three Sri Lankan scientists, glyphosate, an ingredient used in herbicide Roundup may be behind a disease known as CKDu; Chronic Kidney Disease. The ‘u’ in the name indicates a variation from other chronic kidney diseases where the cause is known.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 13 2014

Study finds organic produce is more nutritious


Organic produce certainly costs more than conventionally grown food, but is it better for you?

Existing evidence suggests there are no real health benefits from eating organic food compared to conventionally grown produce. Now a review of the scientific literature concludes that organic consumers may be getting their monies worth; it claims that organic food is more nutritious than conventionally grown fodder.


Related: Study of Organic Crops Finds Fewer Pesticides and More Antioxidants

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 13 2014

Japanese plant experts produce 10,000 lettuce heads a day in LED-lit indoor farm


Could this be the future of agriculture?

A physiologist has turned a former semiconductor factory into one of the world’s largest indoor farm, cultivating lettuces with LED lights.

At almost half the size of a football pitch, the farm, which opened in Japan in July, is already churning out 10,000 lettuce heads a day, the brains behind it say.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 13 2014

Oxygen fluctuations stalled life on Earth


Swings in oxygen levels may be behind a mysterious billion-year hiatus in evolution.

One of the biggest riddles in Earth's history is why animals did not evolve after a spike in oxygen levels approximately 2.3 billion years ago. Instead, despite what scientists had thought was a period of relatively high oxygen, the evolution of life on Earth stalled for what is dubbed the ‘boring billion’.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

One secret of ancient amber revealed


Amber is known to be of the most beautiful gemstones and its mysterious qualities were enough to inspire myths and legends many years ago, and the fossilized tree resin still manages to lock away secrets today. However, scientists have now solved one of the many mysteries that have been under speculation for decades now. Their report on a key aspect of the gemstone’s architecture appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

The Secret Messages That Fooled The Inquisition


Giovanni della Porta was an Italian polymath and scientist back in the 1500s, when agents of the Inquisition were locking people up, including his friends. When he needed to get messages to them, he came up with an ingenious solution that involves writing secret codes inside an egg.

della Porta came up with a method that you can make from kitchen ingredients, although one of those ingredients, alum, is quite rare. Alum is a compound that gets its name from the aluminum in it.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Were Ancient Child Skulls Gifts to the Lake Gods?


Children's skulls found at the edges of Bronze Age settlements may have been a gruesome gift for the local lake gods.

The children's skulls were discovered encircling the perimeter of ancient villages around lakes in Switzerland and Germany. Some had suffered ax blows and other head traumas.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Research Reveals Tonga's Role as Pacific Trade Hub


A geochemical analysis of prehistoric stone artifacts has revealed that Tonga was once the hub of a Pacific trading empire as large as 500,000 square kilometers. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Geoffrey Clarke of Australian National University and his team analyzed Tongan stone artifacts and found that two-thirds of them came from outside Tonga, one from as far as 2,500 kilometers away. The researchers believe Tonga served as a trade hub.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Archaeologists Investigate a Massive Ancient Mycenaean Citadel


A team of archaeologists is surveying and excavating the remains of a major ancient Mycenaean citadel—an archaeological site featuring ruins that are turning out to be much more extensive than what meets the naked eye.

Under the leadership of Associate Professor Christofilis Maggidis of Dickinson College and the auspices of the Athens Archaeological Society, teams of specialists have been systematically surveying an imposing, island-like, flat-topped bedrock outcrop that rises 20-40 meters above a surrounding plain with a summit area stretching 49.5 acres at the northeastern edge of the Kopais basin in southeastern Greece.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Painting stones: Prehistoric decorated quartz pebbles


Painted pebbles are a bit of a conundrum. These decorated, white beach-worn quartz pebbles have been the subject of much thought and discourse since the nineteenth century. The presumed emblematic value of quartz in prehistory may have been important in portable material culture.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

'Is there life on Mars?': Water can and does exist on the planet says new research


Water in its liquid form can exist on Mars but only during the summer and spring months and only for a couple of hours at a time, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have found that despite Mars’ sub-zero temperatures, small amounts of liquid water are able to form on the planet’s surface at the right temperature and with the presence of salt - furthering the idea that the planet can support life.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

India is building a massive, floating solar power plant


India will install a 50 megawatt solar power plant on a 1.27 million square metre floating platform by the end of the year.

Having already started on their plan to install 10 megawatt (MW) solar plants on top of several canals, India has taken the creative use of space one step further and is planning on floating a power station on one of the large stretches of water in Kerala, a state in south-western India.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Sand-based lithium ion batteries that outperform standard by three times


Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

"This is the holy grail – a low cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly way to produce high performance lithium ion battery anodes," said Zachary Favors, a graduate student working with Cengiz and Mihri Ozkan, both engineering professors at UC Riverside.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

How a rocket scientist from Oxford University has reinvented the saucepan


Cooking might not be rocket science, but it has taken a rocket scientist from Oxford University to reinvent the humble saucepan.

Dr Thomas Povey, who usually works designing cooling systems for jet engines, has come up with a new pan which heats up more quickly, cooks food faster and uses 40 per cent less energy.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

There's A Place On Earth That Experiences 1.2 Million Lighting Strikes A Year


In a small area of northwestern Venezuela, where the Catatumbo River meets Lake Maracaibo, you’ll discover one of nature’s most spectacular phenomena - the Catatumbo lightning.

Known as Relámpago del Catatumbo, or “the everlasting storm,” this wondrous natural light show rampages through the sky for up to 160 nights a year, for as long as 10 hours at a time.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default