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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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June 15 2015

3,800-year-old statuettes found in Peru


Researchers in Peru have discovered a trio of statuettes they believe were created by the ancient Caral civilization some 3,800 years ago, the culture ministry said Tuesday.

The mud statuettes were found inside a reed basket in a building at the ancient city of Vichama in northern Peru, which is today an important archaeological site.

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June 15 2015

The grave of Sleeping Beauty: 2,000-year-old Ethiopian site reveals 'beautiful and adored' woman


Archaeologists have uncovered the 2,000-year-old grave of an elegant 'Sleeping Beauty'.

The ancient grave was found in a six-week excavation of the city of Aksum alongside 'extraordinary' artefacts dating from the first and second centuries

These included ornate items such as a necklace made of thousands of coloured beads, Roman glass vessels and a glass perfume flask.

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June 15 2015

Ancient Rome's Aqueducts Held Less Water Than Previously Thought


The majestic aqueduct that fed water to ancient Rome carried less of the life-giving liquid than previously thought, new research suggests.

The Anio Novus aqueduct carried water from the mountains into Rome at a rate of about 370 gallons of water per second, said lead author Bruce Fouke, a geologist and microbiologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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June 15 2015

Gladiator Fights Revealed in Ancient Graffiti


Hundreds of graffiti messages engraved into stone in the ancient city of Aphrodisias, in modern-day Turkey, have been discovered and deciphered, revealing what life was likethereover1,500 years ago, researcherssay.

The graffiti touches on many aspects of the city's life, including gladiator combat, chariot racing, religious fighting and sex. The markings date to a time when the Roman and Byzantine empires ruled over the city.

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June 15 2015

Support for the Death Penalty May Be Linked to Belief in Pure Evil


Earlier this month, Nebraska became the first largely conservative state in more than 40 years to abolish the death penalty, joining 18 other states and the District of Columbia. Considering it was also the very last to decommission the electric chair as its sole method of execution—finally repealing the practice in February 2008—the news surprised many who had previously viewed Nebraska as a quiet Midwestern state firmly aligned with Republican views.

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June 15 2015

UK's largest supermarket chain Tesco will now start giving unsold food to charities


Tesco’s chief executive has said that he does not feel ‘comfortable’ throwing out thousands of tonnes of food waste each year when it could go to helping people in need.

New Statistics published by Tesco revealed that the company threw away 55,400 tonnes of food in last year - around 30,000 tonnes of which was perfectly edible.

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June 15 2015

Multitasking During Exercise May Ramp Up the Workout


Trying to do multiple things at once can have mixed results; you may accomplish more, or you may not get anything done. When it comes to exercising, though, multitasking may be a good idea, a new study suggests.

In the study of older adults, researchers found that, when people completed easy cognitive tasks while they were cycling on a stationary bike, their cycling speed increased.

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June 15 2015

The trip back home often seems to go by faster -- but why?


You may have noticed it the last time you went on a long journey -- by foot, by car or by plane: the outbound portion of your trip seemed to take a lifetime, while the (more or less identical) leg that brought you home felt like it flew by.

Scientists have noticed this "return trip effect" too, and are beginning to hone their understanding of why we experience it.

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June 14 2015

Columbus' map reveals more secrets: Scans uncover new locations and written passages


In 1491, German cartographer Henricus Martellus created a map of the world that is thought to have helped Christopher Columbus navigate the Atlantic.

Today, the map is finally revealing its secrets including hundreds of place names and more than 60 written passages.

One example is information about Japan, which is marked in the wrong place on the 15th century map.


Alt: Hidden secrets of 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

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June 14 2015

Floods as war weapons


From 1500 until 2000, about a third of floods in southwestern Netherlands were deliberately caused by humans during wartimes, new research shows. Some of these inundations resulted in significant changes to the landscape, being as damaging as floods caused by heavy rainfall or storm surges.

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June 14 2015

40,000 year old bracelet crafted by pre-historic human ancestors discovered in the Denisova cave


A unique modern-looking polished green-stone bracelet made out of the green mineral chlorite, and discovered together with a ring carved out of marble, inside an ancient Siberian cave, known as the Denisova cave, in the Altai Mountain range in 2008, has now been determined by Russian Scientists and Archaeologists to be around 40,000 years old, making it the oldest stone bracelet and the oldest piece of jewelry ever discovered, believed to have been crafted by our pre-historic human ancestors.

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June 14 2015

Stone tools from Jordan point to dawn of division of labor


Thousands of stone tools from the early Upper Paleolithic, unearthed from a cave in Jordan, reveal clues about how humans may have started organizing into more complex social groups by planning tasks and specializing in different technical skills.

The Journal of Human Evolution published a study of the artifacts from Mughr el-Hamamah, or Cave of the Doves, led by Emory University anthropologists Liv Nilsson Stutz and Aaron Jonas Stutz.

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June 14 2015

Marriage is more beneficial for men than women, study shows


Marriage has long been cited as a health booster, with couples living in wedded bliss more likely to live longer and have fewer emotional problems. Yet a new study suggests that women hardly benefit from tying the knot.

Landmark research by University College London, the London School of Economics and The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that single women do not suffer the same negative health effects as unmarried men.

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June 14 2015

What your music taste reveals about your social status


Researchers have discovered our position on the social pecking order can be betrayed by the music we listen to, as well as the music we hate.

While they found some genres like opera and classical music - which have long been the preserve of the elite - were most enjoyed by the upper classes, they also found rock, reggae and pop were also more their taste.

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June 14 2015

Too Much Praise Promotes Narcissism


Sometimes it's cute when kids act self-centered. Yet parenting styles can make the difference between a confident child and a narcissistic nightmare, psychologists at the University of Amsterdam and Utrecht University in the Netherlands concluded from the first longitudinal study on the origins of intense feelings of superiority in children.

Two prominent but nearly opposing schools of thought address how narcissism develops.

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June 14 2015

Enhanced visual ability in babies points to autism


Children who go on to develop autism have a heightened ability to pick up fine visual details from as early as nine months of age.

The findings, by researchers from the Birkbeck Babylab at the University of London, are published today in Current Biology.

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June 14 2015

Is bargain shopping a family trait?


If clipping coupons and bargain hunting gives you a thrill, there's a good chance that at least one of your parents had the same enthusiasm. A Rutgers University-Camden marketing expert says "deal proneness" is a trait passed down from parent to child.

"Some people have a taste for getting a bargain," says Robert Schindler, a professor of marketing at the Rutgers School of Business-Camden. "It provides excitement. They seek out bargains and look through the ads for the best deals.".

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