Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  next  >>>

 

May 3 2015

Pesticides alter bees' brains, making them unable to live and reproduce adequately


In research report published in the May 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists report that a particular class of pesticides called "neonicotinoids" wreaks havoc on the bee populations, ultimately putting some crops that rely on pollination in jeopardy. Specifically, these pesticides kill bee brain cells, rendering them unable to learn, gather food and reproduce. The report, however, also suggests that the effects of these pesticides on bee colonies may be reversible by decreasing or eliminating the use of these pesticides on plants pollenated by bees and increasing the availability of "bee-friendly" plants available to the insects.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Western Hemisphere Wipes Out Its Third Virus


It took 15 years and hundreds of millions of vaccines. But North America and South America have officially eradicated rubella, health authorities said Wednesday. Rubella is only the third virus eradicated from people in the Western Hemisphere.

Also known as German measles, rubella causes only a mild illness in children, with a rash and sometimes a fever.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Computing after Moore’s Law


Fifty years ago this month Gordon Moore published a historic paper with an amusingly casual title: “Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits.” The document was Moore’s first articulation of a principle that, after a little revision, became elevated to a law: Every two years the number of transistors on a computer chip will double.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Selling on eBay? Make the asking price an ODD number


Getting the best price for your unwanted wares online can seem like a fine art, but researchers have found a simple trick that could see your bids soar.

Economists plotted how much goods listed on eBay sold for and discovered that items with precise prices attract higher offers than those with round numbers, such as $1,000.


Related: Selling on eBay? Get higher bids with a red background

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

New tool can switch behavior -- such as voracious eating -- 'on' and 'off'


Researchers have perfected a noninvasive "chemogenetic" technique that allows them to switch off a specific behavior in mice -- such as voracious eating -- and then switch it back on. The method works by targeting two different cell surface receptors.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Left-handed people have same genetic code abnormality as those with situs inversus


Left-handed people may be even more unique than first thought, thanks to a study that has linked one rare condition with another.

100,000 people had their genes sequenced to determine handedness, and it seems that a condition called situs inversus may be able to provide clues behind what makes people use their left hand instead of the right.


Related: Child Prodigies and Autism: Is There a Genetic Link?

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Researchers Can Tell Twins Apart Because Of Environmental Changes To DNA


In late 2012, a man raped six women in the south of France. DNA evidence led officials to two suspects, a pair of twins. The victims recognized the men, but couldn’t tell them apart; since the twins' DNA is identical, officials didn’t have a way to figure out which one of them to prosecute.

Forensics specialists have a few ways to tell twins apart, such as testing sperm or using identifying markings like tattoos or scars, but these techniques are very limited.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

A Google for handwriting


To be able to use computers to analyse and search handwritten texts would revolutionise research in the humanities. And the technology to digitise printed books and make them searchable already exists.

Uppsala University library has recently launched a digital platform—Alvin—where digitised works from cultural heritage collections are now being collected into a single database. With just a few clicks it will be possible to search collections, opening up new possibilities for researchers and other interested parties.


Related: Hacked Kinect controller game changer for Parkinson’s

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Tesla Unveils Home Battery to Get You Off the Grid


Electric car pioneer Tesla unveiled a "home battery" Thursday that its founder Elon Musk said would help change the "entire energy infrastructure of the world."

The Tesla Powerwall can store power from solar panels, from the electricity grid at night when it is typically cheaper, and provide a secure backup in the case of a power outage.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

Inanimate beads behave in lifelike ways


Scientists have created microbe-sized beads that can utilize energy in the environment to self-propel upstream by purely physical means.

Life is hard to define, but metabolism, mobility and replication are three commonly agreed elements. The beads are not alive, but they meet two of these three requirements.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 3 2015

The Dark Matter 'conspiracy'


Surprising gravitational similarities between spiral and elliptical galaxies have been discovered by an international team, including astronomers from Swinburne University of Technology, implying the influence of hidden forces.

In the first such survey to capture large numbers of these galaxies, researchers have mapped out the motions of stars in the outer parts of elliptical galaxies using the world's largest optical telescope at W M Keck Observatory in Hawaii.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 2 2015

Radiation from long Mars journey could damage astronauts' brains


Many things would be difficult about conducting a manned mission to Mars, from designing a spacecraft that could make the 34-million-mile journey, to stocking and fueling it, to keeping its astronauts from getting flabby and bored.

On Friday, researchers shed light on another potential hurdle: figuring out a way to protect travelers' brains from the damaging effects of cosmic rays in outer space.


Related: NASA has trialled an engine that would take us to Mars in 10 weeks

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 2 2015

How light resets your body clock


Scientists have discovered what amounts to a reset button for the internal body clock of mice. They say light triggers a process known as phosphorylation—when a phosphate combines with a key protein in the brain.

“This study is the first to reveal a mechanism that explains how light regulates protein synthesis in the brain, and how this affects the function of the circadian clock,” says Nahum Sonenberg, a professor in McGill University’s biochemistry department.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 2 2015

Hit the Gym after Studying to Boost Recall


Regular exercise boosts brain health, and a fit brain is generally able to learn, think and remember better. But a few recent studies offer an additional exercise-related tip: time your workouts for just after a study session, and you might better retain the information you just learned.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 2 2015

Time on your side: how your brain 'encodes' your personal sense of time


We, and the world around us, may have a more important role in determining our inner sense of time than we thought

Timing, that is our perception and estimation of time, is key in determining how we behave and in the decisions we make. New findings suggest that time in the brain is relative, not absolute.


Related: Think days, not years, to fight procrastination

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 2 2015

For the blind, hearing the way forward can be a tradeoff


There’s a common notion that people who have deficiencies in one sensory area must have enhancements in others: People with hearing loss have better sight, and people who are blind certainly must have better hearing. That idea even shows up in our superhero stories. Mild-mannered lawyer by day, vigilante by night, Marvel’s Daredevil cannot see. He was blinded as a child. But the same radioactive sludge that took his sight enhanced his other abilities. He now has superhuman hearing, touch, smell and even a vague sort of radar.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
May 2 2015

Out-of-Body Experience Is Traced in the Brain


What happens in the brain when a person has an out-of-body experience? A team of scientists may now have an answer.

In a new study, researchers using a brain scanner and some fancy camera work gave study participants the illusion that their bodies were located in a part of a room other than where they really were. Then, the researchers examined the participants' brain activity, to find out which brain regions were involved in the participants' perceptions about where their body was.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page:  <<<  prev  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default