News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  next  >>>

 

July 12 2014

Were Ancient Child Skulls Gifts to the Lake Gods?


Children's skulls found at the edges of Bronze Age settlements may have been a gruesome gift for the local lake gods.

The children's skulls were discovered encircling the perimeter of ancient villages around lakes in Switzerland and Germany. Some had suffered ax blows and other head traumas.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Research Reveals Tonga's Role as Pacific Trade Hub


A geochemical analysis of prehistoric stone artifacts has revealed that Tonga was once the hub of a Pacific trading empire as large as 500,000 square kilometers. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Geoffrey Clarke of Australian National University and his team analyzed Tongan stone artifacts and found that two-thirds of them came from outside Tonga, one from as far as 2,500 kilometers away. The researchers believe Tonga served as a trade hub.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Archaeologists Investigate a Massive Ancient Mycenaean Citadel


A team of archaeologists is surveying and excavating the remains of a major ancient Mycenaean citadel—an archaeological site featuring ruins that are turning out to be much more extensive than what meets the naked eye.

Under the leadership of Associate Professor Christofilis Maggidis of Dickinson College and the auspices of the Athens Archaeological Society, teams of specialists have been systematically surveying an imposing, island-like, flat-topped bedrock outcrop that rises 20-40 meters above a surrounding plain with a summit area stretching 49.5 acres at the northeastern edge of the Kopais basin in southeastern Greece.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Painting stones: Prehistoric decorated quartz pebbles


Painted pebbles are a bit of a conundrum. These decorated, white beach-worn quartz pebbles have been the subject of much thought and discourse since the nineteenth century. The presumed emblematic value of quartz in prehistory may have been important in portable material culture.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

'Is there life on Mars?': Water can and does exist on the planet says new research


Water in its liquid form can exist on Mars but only during the summer and spring months and only for a couple of hours at a time, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have found that despite Mars’ sub-zero temperatures, small amounts of liquid water are able to form on the planet’s surface at the right temperature and with the presence of salt - furthering the idea that the planet can support life.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

India is building a massive, floating solar power plant


India will install a 50 megawatt solar power plant on a 1.27 million square metre floating platform by the end of the year.

Having already started on their plan to install 10 megawatt (MW) solar plants on top of several canals, India has taken the creative use of space one step further and is planning on floating a power station on one of the large stretches of water in Kerala, a state in south-western India.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Sand-based lithium ion batteries that outperform standard by three times


Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

"This is the holy grail – a low cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly way to produce high performance lithium ion battery anodes," said Zachary Favors, a graduate student working with Cengiz and Mihri Ozkan, both engineering professors at UC Riverside.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

How a rocket scientist from Oxford University has reinvented the saucepan


Cooking might not be rocket science, but it has taken a rocket scientist from Oxford University to reinvent the humble saucepan.

Dr Thomas Povey, who usually works designing cooling systems for jet engines, has come up with a new pan which heats up more quickly, cooks food faster and uses 40 per cent less energy.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

There's A Place On Earth That Experiences 1.2 Million Lighting Strikes A Year


In a small area of northwestern Venezuela, where the Catatumbo River meets Lake Maracaibo, you’ll discover one of nature’s most spectacular phenomena - the Catatumbo lightning.

Known as Relámpago del Catatumbo, or “the everlasting storm,” this wondrous natural light show rampages through the sky for up to 160 nights a year, for as long as 10 hours at a time.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Researchers find evidence of super-fast deep earthquake


As scientists learn more about earthquakes that rupture at fault zones near the planet's surface—and the mechanisms that trigger them—an even more intriguing earthquake mystery lies deeper in the planet.

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have discovered the first evidence that deep earthquakes, those breaking at more than 400 kilometers (250 miles) below Earth's surface, can rupture much faster than ordinary earthquakes.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Big or small, animals take 20 seconds to pee


Researchers investigated how quickly 32 different kinds of animals urinate—and big or small, it’s remarkably the same.

Even though an elephant’s bladder is 3,600 times larger than a cat’s—just under five gallons vs. about one teaspoon—both animals relieve themselves in about 20 seconds.

In fact, all animals that weigh more than 6.6 pounds urinate in that same time span.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Rats alter the way they use whiskers to help navigation


Rats change the way they use their whiskers in a similar way to how humans use their hands, scientists have shown.

Rats explore the world around them by moving their facial whiskers backwards and forwards, called "whisking".

Researchers found that rats in familiar environments changed from exploratory whisking to pushing their whiskers forward to detect obstacles instead.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

Gassy Cows Emit More Methane than Oil Industry


A surprising amount of methane, a potent greenhouse gas of interest to scientists tracking climate change, comes from livestock, which accounted for 70 percent more emissions than the oil and gas industry, a new study shows.

The finding, based on satellite data collected in 2004, shows the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sorely underestimated the amount of methane gas from cattle, pigs and other animals. The EPA also overestimated emissions from the oil and gas industry.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 12 2014

More Big Whales in Ocean Could Mean More Fish, Scientists Find


Scientists and fisheries managers have long underestimated the valuable role large whales play in healthy ocean ecosystems, a new study suggests. And, scientists add, those commercial fishermen who complain that whales steal fish from their nets have it wrong.

An increase in the number of large whales—like blue, sperm, right, and gray—around the world could lead to a healthier ocean and more fish, a team of scientists report in a review study published this month in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 11 2014

Nature rather than nurture governs intelligent behaviour in primates, scientists discover


The vexed question of whether intelligence is inherited from birth or acquired through education seems to have been answered – for chimpanzees at least.

Scientists have found that being a smart primate is down to genes rather than upbringing, suggesting that nature rather than nurture governs intelligent behaviour in our closest living relatives.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 11 2014

Gorillas Use Body Odor to Communicate


When it comes to wild ape communication, it’s not just monkey see, monkey do — it’s also monkey smell, monkey do. A new study finds that gorillas use odor signals to communicate.

The study — the first analysis of chemical signaling in wild gorillas — may also shed light on how odor signalling between humans evolved.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
July 11 2014

Bird decline 'smoking gun' for pesticide's effects


The widespread use of a type of insecticide that has been blamed for honeybee deaths is linked to a marked decline in bird numbers in Europe, a report says.

Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid chemical, is widely used in agriculture to exterminate pests.

Dutch scientists say their data shows that the chemical is associated with a collapse in common bird species.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default