News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  next  >>>

 

September 3 2014

SoftBank to Sell World's First Humanoid Robot 'Pepper' in US Next Year


The world's first personal robot named "Pepper" will be sold in US stores next year, Japanese technology company SoftBank has announced.

The 1.2m robot, which is equipped with a laser sensor and 12 hours of battery life, can dance, make jokes and even interpret human emotions based on facial expressions.

Originally designed for families and the elderly, it increasingly appears as though the robot has captured the imagination of big business.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations


Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. This is according to a study from Umea University in Sweden published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

A fundamental characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, so-called first-order neurons in the tactile system, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Too Much Screen Time May Worsen Kids' Ability to Read Emotions


Too much face-to-screen time and not enough face-to-face interaction could degrade kids' ability to read other people's emotions, a new study suggests.

A team of researchers from UCLA discovered that a group of sixth graders who didn't use a phone, TV or computer for five days were much better at reading other people's emotions correctly than a group of sixth graders who spent those five days engrossed with their phones and other electronic devices for their normal amount of time.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Childhood Diet Habits Set in Infancy, Studies Suggest


Efforts to improve what children eat should begin before they even learn to walk, a series of nutritional studies published on Tuesday has found. Taken together, the data indicate that infant feeding patterns persist far longer than has been appreciated.

“Our early taste preferences, particularly for fruits and vegetables, and on the flip side for sugary beverages, are lasting”.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Benefits for babies exposed to two languages found in Singaporean birth cohort study


There are advantages associated with exposure to two languages in infancy, as team of investigators and clinician-scientists in Singapore and internationally have found. The findings reveal a generalized cognitive advantage that emerges early in bilingual infants, and is not specific to a particular language.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Economic success 'drives language extinction'


Economic development is driving the extinction of some languages, scientists believe.

A study has found that minority languages in the most developed parts of the world, including North America, Europe and Australia, are most at threat.


Related: From marvellous to awesome: how spoken British English has changed

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Limits to Growth was right. New research shows we're nearing collapse


The 1972 book Limits to Growth, which predicted our civilisation would probably collapse some time this century, has been criticised as doomsday fantasy since it was published. Back in 2002, self-styled environmental expert Bjorn Lomborg consigned it to the “dustbin of history”.

It doesn’t belong there. Research from the University of Melbourne has found the book’s forecasts are accurate, 40 years on.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Modern population boom traced to pre-industrial roots


The foundation of the human population explosion, commonly attributed to a sudden surge in industrialization and public health during the 18th and 19th centuries, was actually laid as far back as 2,000 years ago, suggests an extended model of detailed demographic and archeological data.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Time Travel Simulation Resolves “Grandfather Paradox”


What would happen to you if you went back in time and killed your grandfather? A model using photons reveals that quantum mechanics can solve the quandary—and even foil quantum cryptography

On June 28, 2009, the world-famous physicist Stephen Hawking threw a party at the University of Cambridge, complete with balloons, hors d'oeuvres and iced champagne. Everyone was invited but no one showed up. Hawking had expected as much, because he only sent out invitations after his party had concluded. It was, he said, "a welcome reception for future time travelers," a tongue-in-cheek experiment to reinforce his 1992 conjecture that travel into the past is effectively impossible.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Old Ship Logs Reveal Adventure, Tragedy And Hints About Climate


What can yesterday's weather tell us about how the climate is changing today? That's what an army of volunteers looking at old ships' logs is trying to answer through the Old Weather project.

Mariners have long kept meticulous logbooks of weather conditions and descriptions of life onboard, and the National Archives in Washington, D.C., has pages and pages and pages of them recorded by sailors on Navy and Coast Guard vesselsa.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 3 2014

Psychedelic Culture Tripped Circa 500 A.D.


Sophisticated drug paraphernalia, complete with a hippy-looking headband, provide evidence that an elite, hallucinogen-using culture flourished at around 500 A.D. in the south-central Andes and lasted there for at least another 600 years.

The items, described in the latest issue of the journal Antiquity, shed light on the lifestyle and belief systems once held by the people of Tiwanaku, an ancient city-state located near Lake Titicaca, Bolivia.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 2 2014

Neanderthal 'art' created 40,000 years ago found in Gibraltar cave


Neanderthals, long assumed to be simple, early forms of human beings, whose looks characterise them as brutish creatures, have shown signs of being more considered and creative than the species has previously been given credit for.


Related: Newly Discovered Engraving May Revise Picture of Neanderthal Intelligence, Nat Geo

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 2 2014

Chimps Outplay Humans in Brain Games


We humans assume we are the smartest of all creations. In a world with over 8.7 million species, only we have the ability to understand the inner workings of our body while also unraveling the mysteries of the universe. We are the geniuses, the philosophers, the artists, the poets and savants. We amuse at a dog playing ball, a dolphin jumping rings, or a monkey imitating man because we think of these as remarkable acts for animals that, we presume, aren’t smart as us. But what is smart? Is it just about having ideas, or being good at language and math?

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 2 2014

Photos of 'Yeti Footprints' Hit the Auction Block


Ardent believers in the existence of a mythical creature known as the Yeti may be excited to learn that rare photographic "evidence" of this mysterious beast is now up for auction.

In 1951, British mountaineer Eric Earle Shipton was leading an expedition on Mount Everest when he took a series of photographs of what he believed might be the footprints of a bipedal, apelike creature known as the Yeti. The photos sparked debate in Europe about the existence of the mythical Himalayan creature, according to Christie's, the auction house handling the online sale.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 2 2014

NASA is building an air traffic control system for drones


NASA is developing an air traffic control system for drones. The New York Times reports the US space agency is working on creating a management system for vehicles that fly at around 400 to 500 feet off the ground — much lower than conventional aircraft — at its Moffett Field base around four miles from Google's Mountain View headquarters. The system would check for other low-flying drone traffic, help the small unmanned vehicles avoid buildings, and scan for adverse weather conditions that might knock a drone out of the sky.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 2 2014

Scientists Call for Investigation of Mysterious Cloud-like Collections In Cells


About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don’t know what they do — even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the life of a cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
September 2 2014

A brief history of psychedelic psychiatry


Osmond was one of a small group of psychiatrists who pioneered the use of LSD as a treatment for alcoholism and various mental disorders in the early 1950s. He coined the term psychedelic, meaning ‘mind manifesting’ and although his research into the therapeutic potential of LSD produced promising initial results, it was halted during the 1960s for social and political reasons.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default