Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  next  >>>

 

April 3 2014

Health risks of Mars mission would exceed NASA limits


Efforts to send humans to Mars would likely expose them to health risks beyond the limits of what NASA currently allows, an independent panel of medical experts said Wednesday.

Therefore, any long-term or deep space missions—which are still decades off—need a special level of ethical scrutiny, said the report by the Institute of Medicine.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Mini robot space surgeon to climb inside astronauts


It could one day answer the prayers of astronauts who need surgery in deep space. The miniature surgeon slides into the body through an incision in the belly button. Once inside the abdominal cavity – which has been filled with inert gas to make room for it to work – the robot can remove an ailing appendix, cut pieces from a diseased colon or perforate a gastric ulcer.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Massive Chile Earthquake May Not Be the "Big One"


A big earthquake of magnitude 8.2 shook the coast of northern Chile on Tuesday night, setting off small landslides and a small tsunami and killing at least five people. But scientists say the quake, while large, was not the "big one" that is predicted for the region.


Related: Chilean earthquake may be part of a cascade

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Altitude sickness 'two illnesses' says Edinburgh University study


Altitude sickness is two illnesses, according to Edinburgh scientists.

The condition, triggered by falling oxygen levels, causes mild sickness, headaches and life-threatening problems affecting the heart, lungs and brain.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Can gratitude reduce costly impatience?


In a potentially landmark study, a team of researchers demonstrate that feelings of gratitude automatically reduce financial impatience. The human mind tends to devalue future rewards compared to immediate ones -- a phenomenon that often leads to favoring immediate gratification over long-term wellbeing.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Tobacco plant may light the way to beating cancer, Australian scientists say


The tobacco plant could be a powerful weapon in the fight against cancer, say Australian scientists.

They have found a molecule in the flower of the plant that targets cancer cells and rips them open, according to an article in the journal eLife.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

New evidence linking fruit and vegetable consumption with lower mortality


Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death at any point in time by 42 percent compared to eating less than one portion, reports a new study. This is the first study to link fruit and vegetable consumption with all-cause, cancer and heart disease deaths in a nationally-representative population, the first to quantify health benefits per-portion, and the first to identify the types of fruit and vegetable with the most benefit.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Medieval Poop Found: Still Stinks


A number of Medieval wooden barrels have been uncovered in Denmark, revealing their less- than-glamorous contents.

Originally built to transport goods and store fish, the barrels were converted into latrines — still filled with their original contents.

"We are talking about 700-year-old latrines. And yes, they still smell bad," Maria Elisabeth Lauridsen, the archaeologist in charge of the excavation, told Discovery News.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

6th-Century Monastery with Elaborate Mosaics Unearthed in Israel


The remains of a 1,500-year-old monastery with intact mosaics covering the floor have been unearthed in southern Israel, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Tuesday (April 1).

The Byzantine complex — which was discovered near Hura, a Bedouin village in the northern Negev Desert — measures 65 feet by 115 feet (20 by 35 meters).

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Shepherds Spread Grain Along Silk Road 5,000 Years Ago


Nearly 5,000 years ago, nomadic shepherds opened some of the first links between eastern and western Asia. Archaeologists recently discovered domesticated crops from opposite sides of the continent mingled together in ancient herders' campsites found in the rugged grasslands and mountains of central Asia.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 3 2014

Ancient Monastery at Petra Likely Built to Track Sun


Add the Monastery at Petra to the monuments that humans probably built for astronomical purposes. New research suggests that ancient architects tracked the motion of the sun and constructed the religious center with the winter solstice in mind.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

World’s oldest weather report could alter Egyptian history


An inscription on a 3,500-year-old stone block from Egypt may be one of the world’s oldest weather reports—and could provide new evidence about the chronology of events in the ancient Middle East.

A new translation of a 40-line inscription on the 6-foot-tall calcite block called the Tempest Stela describes rain, darkness, and “the sky being in storm without cessation, louder than the cries of the masses.”.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

Ancient Tomb With Pyramid Entrance Found in Egypt


A tomb newly excavated at an ancient cemetery in Egypt would have boasted a pyramid 7 meters (23 feet) high at its entrance, archaeologists say.

The tomb, found at the site of Abydos, dates back around 3,300 years. Within one of its vaulted burial chambers, a team of archaeologists found a finely crafted sandstone sarcophagus, painted red, which was created for a scribe named Horemheb.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

Could the Pharaohs Read and Write?


Little is known about the education of royal children in ancient Egypt, so Filip Taterka of Adam Mickiewicz University examined Egyptian texts for clues to the literacy of the pharaohs. He found references to medical documents, letters, and wisdom literature written by the kings, and adds that the writing implements found in the tomb of Tutankhamun suggests that the boy king had been educated.


More here

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

How a Medieval Philosopher Dreamed Up the 'Multiverse'


The idea that our universe may be just one among many out there has intrigued modern cosmologists for some time. But it looks like this "multiverse" concept might actually have appeared, albeit unintentionally, back in the Middle Ages.

When scientists analyzed a 13th-century Latin text and applied modern mathematics to it, they found hints that the English philosopher who wrote it in 1225 was already toying with concepts similar to the multiverse.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

Monks' Secret: Asbestos Lurking Beneath Byzantine Wall Paintings


Hundreds of years before asbestos became ubiquitous in the construction industry, Byzantine monks used the fibrous material in plaster coatings underlying their wall paintings during the late 1100s, new research shows.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

‘Holy Grail’ in Spanish church faces skeptical inquisition from historians


Claims that the Holy Grail has been found after sitting for 1,000 years in a Spanish church face a tough inquisition from doubtful historians.

Visitors flocked to the museum of the San Isidro basilica in Leon after a new book said it contained the chalice from which Jesus Christ sipped at the Last Supper.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
April 2 2014

Europeans have three times more Neanderthal genes for lipid catabolism than Asians or Africans


Contemporary Europeans have as many as three times more Neanderthal variants in genes involved in lipid catabolism than Asians and Africans. Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in modern humans. These shared regions are unevenly distributed across the genome and some regions are particularly enriched with Neanderthal variants.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page:  <<<  prev  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default