Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  next  >>>

 

December 2 2014

Sound Waves Can Heal Brain Disorders


The brain is protected by formidable defenses. In addition to the skull, the cells that make up the blood-brain barrier keep pathogens and toxic substances from reaching the central nervous system. The protection is a boon, except when we need to deliver drugs to treat illnesses. Now researchers are testing a way to penetrate these bastions: sound waves.


Related: Tongue Shocks Hasten Healing

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Haptic holograms let you touch the void in VR


Feeling is believing. A system that uses sound waves to project "haptic holograms" into mid-air – letting you touch 3D virtual objects with your bare hands – is poised to bring virtual reality into the physical world.

Adding a sense of touch as well as sight and sound will make it easier to completely immerse yourself in VR. And the ability to feel the shape of virtual objects could let doctors use their hands to examine a lump detected by a CT scan, for example. What's more, museum visitors could handle virtual replicas of priceless exhibits while the real thing remained safely behind glass.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Ambulance drone can help heart attack victims in under 2 minutes


Drones get a bad rap from the FAA but there’s growing evidence that more unmanned aircraft in the sky would do more good than harm. We’ve already seen how drones can save the day in search-and-rescue situations, and now a Dutch student is showing people how the devices, which can weigh under 5 pounds, could be a game-changer in medical emergencies.

Alex Momont, an engineer at the Technical University of Delft, has created an airborne defibrillator-delivery system that can reach anyone with a five-square-mile area in less than minutes.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Stephen Hawking warns artificial intelligence could end mankind


Stephen Hawking: "Humans, who are limited by slow biological evolution, couldn't compete and would be superseded"

Prof Stephen Hawking, one of Britain's pre-eminent scientists, has said that efforts to create thinking machines pose a threat to our very existence.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Photons double up to make the invisible visible


People have infrared vision — and it could be the result of pairs of photons combining their energies to appear as one 'visible' photon.

Although we do not have X-ray vision like Superman, we have what could seem to be another superpower: we can see infrared light — beyond what was traditionally considered the visible spectrum. A series of experiments now suggests that this little-known, puzzling effect could occur when pairs of infrared photons simultaneously hit the same pigment protein in the eye, providing enough energy to set in motion chemical changes that allow us to see the light.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip


During a thunderstorm, we all know that it is common to hear thunder after we see the lightning. That's because sound travels much slower (768 miles per hour) than light (670,000,000 miles per hour).

Now, University of Minnesota engineering researchers have developed a chip on which both sound wave and light wave are generated and confined together so that the sound can very efficiently control the light. The novel device platform could improve wireless communications systems using optical fibers and ultimately be used for computation using quantum physics.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

New Twist Found in the Story of Life’s Start


All life on Earth is made of molecules that twist in the same direction. New research reveals that this may not always have been so.

For 30 years, Gerald Joyce has been trying to create life. As a graduate student in the 1980s, he studied how the first RNA molecules — chemical cousins to DNA that can both store and transmit genetic information — might have assembled themselves out of simpler units, a process that many scientists believe led to the first living things.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Scientists hail the most 'advanced anti-ageing serum' in the world


New research suggests skincare tailored to individuals' DNA may be the best way to combat the appearance of ageing

Those who believe that beauty is only skin deep may need to think again.

A most advanced anti-ageing serum ever created is going far deeper in the pursuit of the ultimate skincare regime, right into our DNA.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Synthetic enzymes hint at life without DNA or RNA


Enzymes that don't exist in nature have been made from genetic material that doesn't exist in nature either, called XNA, or xeno nucleic acid.

It's the first time this has been done and the results reinforce the possibility that life could evolve without DNA or RNA, the two self-replicating molecules considered indispensible for life on Earth.


Alt: Scientists make enzymes from scratch

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

HIV evolving 'into milder form'


HIV is evolving to become less deadly and less infectious, according to a major scientific study.

The team at the University of Oxford shows the virus is being "watered down" as it adapts to our immune systems.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Natural 'high' could avoid chronic marijuana use


Replenishing the supply of a molecule that normally activates cannabinoid receptors in the brain could relieve mood and anxiety disorders and enable some people to quit using marijuana, a Vanderbilt University study suggests.

Cannabinoid receptors are normally activated by compounds in the brain called endocannabinoids, the most abundant of which is 2-AG. They also are "turned on" by the active ingredient in marijuana.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 2 2014

Nature makes all articles free to view


All research papers from Nature will be made free to read in a proprietary screen-view format that can be annotated but not copied, printed or downloaded, the journal’s publisher Macmillan announced on 2 December.

The content-sharing policy, which also applies to 48 other journals in Macmillan’s Nature Publishing Group (NPG) division, including Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine and Nature Physics, marks an attempt to let scientists freely read and share articles while preserving NPG’s primary source of income — the subscription fees libraries and individuals pay to gain access to articles.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 1 2014

Search for the world's first zero leads to the home of Angkor Wat


The first recorded zero has been rediscovered on a stone tablet deep in the Cambodian jungle - a single dot chiseled into stone, hidden decades ago from the grasp of the Khmer Rouge. This is one of the only photos in existence of the priceless find.

US-based mathematician, Amir Aczel, made it his life’s work to find the world’s first zero. Having already discovered the first magic square inscribed on the doorway of a 10th-century Indian temple, this ‘mathematical archaeologist’ had come to know of K-127 - a stone stele first documented in 1931 that clearly held the inscription “605”. Dated to AD 683, it’s the oldest known representation of zero - a numeral that Aczel describes as the most significant of them all.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 1 2014

Author asks: was Leonardo Da Vinci's mother a Chinese slave?


Was Leonardo da Vinci's mother a Chinese slave? That astounding theory is being put forward by a Hong Kong-based historian and novelist who has spent the last two years piecing documents together to connect the dots.


Alt: Was the Mona Lisa actually a portrait of Da Vinci's CHINESE mother? Author says she was slave

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 1 2014

Rice Farming Linked to Holistic Thinking


Often we view Chinese culture through an East versus West lens. But joint research from the U.S. and China indicates that northern Chinese may have a mind-set closer to individualistic Americans than their southern compatriots. And the reason is rice.

The Yangtze River splits China into north and south and serves as an agricultural and cultural divide, explains University of Virginia doctoral candidate Thomas Talhelm, first author of the study, which appears in Science. Farmers north of the Yangtze predominantly grow wheat, and those to the south grow rice.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 1 2014

Does Good Music Make Us Better People?


A recent Japanese study suggests that listening to good music might make us more altruistic, while bad music makes us more selfish.

By “chill-inducing” the authors are talking about music that the listener enjoys, e.g. music to which the listener wants to chill rather than music that literally induces chills. Lots of caveats here, of course: it’s a small-scale study, the dictator game is far too low-risk to be a reliable indicator of altruism, and so forth. But we’ve already established that music can increase stamina, so it’s not a huge stretch to speculate that it might increase or diminish our capacity for altruism, too.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
December 1 2014

Rude comments online are a reality we can't get away from


Any verbal exchange – whether a scientific panel discussion, lovers quarrelling in a hallway, or the political hard-talk of a live interview – is a very sophisticated human activity.

Besides the intricate relationship between syntax, semantics and phonetics of the language used – itself something that takes years to master – there are all the unwritten conversational rules about turn-taking and reading body language that need to be understood and practiced in order for any exchange of opinion to work effectively.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page:  <<<  prev  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default