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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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October 1 2014

Your Digital Twin Could Be Making Your Decisions


In a recent and intriguing article at Business Insider, futurist John Smart makes a bold prediction in regard to near-future technology: Within five years, we could each have a “digital twin” — an online version of ourselves that will make decisions for us in a world of information overload.

Of course, futurists are prone to bold predictions. It’s literally part of the job. But the implications of Smart’s ideas have an eerie ring of plausibility. The basic gist is that, as personal digital assistants like Siri and Cortana evolve, they’ll learn our habits and preferences at the same time that we’re delegating more and more tasks to them.

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October 1 2014

Blades of grass inspire advance in organic solar cells


Using a bio-mimicking analog of one of nature's most efficient light-harvesting structures, blades of grass, an international research team has taken a major step in developing long-sought polymer architecture to boost power-conversion efficiency of light to electricity for use in electronic devices.

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October 1 2014

Smart, eco-friendly new battery made of seeds and pine resin


Present-day lithium batteries are efficient but involve a range of resource and environmental problems. Using materials from alfalfa (lucerne seed) and pine resin and a clever recycling strategy, researchers have now come up with a highly interesting alternative.


Related: Battery system will be able to light 2,500 homes

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October 1 2014

This little Spanish island will run on 100% renewable energy within months


El Hierro, a tiny Spanish island off the west coast of Africa, has done away with fossil fuels. In just a few months time, the entire island will be running on 100 percent renewable energy - from the power of wind and water.


Related: Solar Energy Could Dominate Electricity by 2050

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October 1 2014

Harvesting energy from walking


A device that fits into a shoe harvests the energy made by walking and successfully uses it in watch batteries.

At the Center for Research in Advanced Materials (CIMAV), scientists decided to "capture" the energy produced by people walking. They designed a pill-shaped cylinder adapted to a shoe in order to store the mechanical-vibrational energy the person generates when walking.

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October 1 2014

Bats may mistake wind turbines for trees


Some species of bats may mistake wind turbines for tall trees, and follow seemingly familiar air flow patterns to their doom.

US researchers used thermal and infra-red surveillance cameras to observe bat behaviour around three wind turbines over three months, and report their results in today's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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October 1 2014

Could a Life-Sized TV Control Your Dog’s Brain?


This question was not proposed by a mad scientist bent on world doggie domination. The idea to see whether dogs follow life-sized videos is actually entirely sensible.

Researchers studying non-human animals want to know whether their species of interest will attend to artificial stimuli—like photographs, slides or films—because if a species realistically attends to artificial stimuli, you can have more control over stimulus presentation, and you can even manipulate and ask questions about the stimulus itself.

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October 1 2014

First evidence that reptiles can learn through imitation


New research has for the first time provided evidence that reptiles could be capable of social learning through imitation.

The ability to acquire new skills through the 'true imitation' of others' behaviour is thought to be unique to humans and advanced primates, such as chimpanzees.

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October 1 2014

Chimp social network shows how new ideas catch on


Three years ago, an adult chimpanzee called Nick dipped a piece of moss into a watering hole in Uganda's Budongo Forest. Watched by a female, Nambi, he lifted the moss to his mouth and squeezed the water out. Nambi copied him and, over the next six days, moss sponging began to spread through the community. A chimp trend was born.


Alt: Wild chimps ape each other with a new 'tool' - and reveal how their culture evolves

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October 1 2014

Multitudes of mighty sea monkeys move oceans, study says


Every evening, sunset signals the start of dinner for billions of wiggling sea monkeys living in the ocean. As these sea monkeys – which are not actually monkeys but a type of shrimp – swarm to the surface in one large, culminating force, they may contribute as much power to ocean currents as the wind and tides do, a new study reports.

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October 1 2014

Ban On Single-Use Plastic Bags Is Enacted In California


Gov. Jerry Brown has signed SB 270, the first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags in the U.S.

"This bill is a step in the right direction — it reduces the torrent of plastic polluting our beaches, parks and even the vast ocean itself," Brown said. "We're the first to ban these bags, and we won't be the last.".

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October 1 2014

Climate Change Could Alter Human Male-Female Ratio


Climate change could affect the ratio of human males to human females that are born in some countries, a new study from Japan suggests. The researchers found that male fetuses may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Since the 1970s, temperature fluctuations from the norm have become more common in Japan, and at the same time there has been an increase in the deaths of male fetuses, relative to the number of deaths of female fetuses in that country, according to the study.

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October 1 2014

Have Humans Really Created a New Geologic Age?


If you know how to read it, the face of a cliff can be as compelling as the latest bestselling novel. Each layer of rock is a chapter in Earth’s history, telling stories of birth and death, winners and losers, that help scientists understand the evolution of the planet over the past 4.6 billion years.

While humans arrived only recently on geologic time scales, our species already seems to be driving some major plot developments.

These changes have become so noticeable on a global scale that many scientists believe we have started a new chapter in Earth’s story: the Anthropocene.

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October 1 2014

We've Lost So Much Antarctic Ice It's Causing A Dip In Earth's Gravity


An ESA satellite has spotted something unusual happening in the Antarctic: As the ice has dwindled there over the last five years, they're also seeing a change in the Earth's gravity.

The GOCE satellite was launched in 2009 to undertake a detailed mapping of Earth's gravity, along with any fluctuations in strength. As researchers recently began analyzing the data they'd received, they noticed something curious: the variations in gravity they were seeing in the Antarctic were mirrored by the changes in ice as the collapse of the ice sheet there accelerated.

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September 30 2014

Glaciers in the Grand Canyon of Mars?


For decades, planetary geologists have speculated that glaciers might once have crept through Valles Marineris, the 2000-mile-long chasm that constitutes the Grand Canyon of Mars. Using satellite images, researchers have identified features that might have been carved by past glaciers as they flowed through the canyons; however, these observations have remained highly controversial and contested.

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September 30 2014

The Timing Of Meteor Strikes May Not Be Random


Astronomers tend to assume that the timing of Earth-striking meteors are completely random, but a recent analysis suggests that meteor impacts are more likely to occur at certain times of the year and at certain locations.

Such is the conclusion of researchers Carlos and Raul de la Fuente Marcos of the Complutense University of Madrid.

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September 30 2014

Scientists "resurrect" ancient proteins to learn about primordial life on Earth


Geological evidence tells us that ancient Earth probably looked and felt very different from the planet we all recognize today. Billions of years ago, our world was a comparatively harsh place. Earth likely had a hotter climate, acidic oceans and an atmosphere loaded with carbon dioxide. The fact that manmade climate change, through carbon dioxide pollution, is re-introducing such hotter, acidified conditions demonstrates their intertwinement.

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