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March 9 2015

Mystery deepens over ancient Greek tomb


THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) -- A geologist who took part in the excavation of the ancient burial mound in Amphipolis in northern Greece says the ancient tomb found together with a series of vaulted rooms wasn't built at the same time, but somewhat later than the rooms themselves.

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March 9 2015

Report: Solar Will Dominate World Energy Supply in Just 15 Years


Deutsche Bank has produced a 175 page report that will have the Koch bros and their bought and paid for minions as well as every oil, coal and natural gas company weeping in their Chevas Regal or Glenfiddich.

The report suggests that solar generated energy will be the dominant source of energy worldwide within the next 15 years. Not only that, but the solar industry will generate $5 trillion in revenue in that time while displacing fossil fuels. Ohhh...I LOVE it!!

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March 9 2015

China’s wind farms can now produce more energy than all of America’s nuclear plants


China is building more than a third of the world’s nuclear reactors currently under construction, and has plans to triple its nuclear power capacity by 2020. That has some observers worried about the country’s opaque and politicized nuclear safety regulations.

But amid all the hype over nuclear power, China has been expanding its wind power capacity at an even faster clip. Last year, China’s wind farms reached a capacity of 115,000 megawatts, compared with just 20,000 megawatts from its nuclear sector.

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March 9 2015

Self driving cars could free up rush hour traffic


A fleet of shared self-driving cars in Stockholm could reduce rush hour traffic volumes by 14 cars for every shared vehicle, according to researchers at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology.

Meanwhile, the remaining automobile commuters would need only 20 percent of the metropolitan area's existing parking spaces, their study says.


Related: Insurers worry self-driving cars could put a dent in their business

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March 9 2015

Soon You’ll Be Able to Turn Your Brown Eyes Blue for $5,000


A new treatment has successfully changed the color of people's eyes in Latin America, but the procedure isn't approved in the U.S. yet.

For years, a California-based company called Stroma Medical has been publicizing a laser procedure that turns brown eyes blue. Theoretically, this would give brown-eyed individuals the choice to change the tint of their irises, not unlike the way many decide to use surgery to alter the noses or chests they were born with.

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March 9 2015

Fungus Used to Brew Up New Fragrances


Would you wear yeast perfume? Boston-based Ginkgo Bioworks is brewing up a new concoction that contains yeast – that’s right, the microscopic fungus – that’s been genetically engineered to smell like roses.

This mixture could serve as a more convenient and cost-effective alternative to using actual rose oil, a classic perfume component derived from roses picked by hand from fields in Bulgaria and Turkey and then later distilled.

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March 9 2015

Protecting crops from radiation-contaminated soil


Almost four years after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, farmland remains contaminated with higher-than-natural levels of radiocesium in some regions of Japan, with cesium-134 and cesium-137 being the most troublesome because of the slow rate at which they decay. In a study published in Scientific Reports, a group at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan led by Ryoung Shin has identified a chemical compound that prevents plants from taking up cesium, thus protecting them—and us—from its harmful effects.

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March 9 2015

Daylight saving time is one big experiment for scientists


To some people, the transition to daylight saving time means a few days of sleep deprivation, or the chance to leave work before the sky is completely dark. To others, it’s a perfect opportunity to conduct scientific research.

Not just sleep-related research. If you ever wondered whether changing the clocks twice a year would lead to more cyberloafing at work, you’ll be glad to know that business school professors wondered that too. Got a hunch that daylight saving time affects air quality? So did a geophysicist in Chile.

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March 9 2015

Solar Impulse plane begins epic global flight


A record-breaking attempt to fly around the world in a solar-powered plane has got under way from Abu Dhabi.

The aircraft - called Solar Impulse-2 - took off from the Emirate, heading east to Muscat in Oman.

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March 9 2015

When temperature goes quantum


A UA-led collaboration of physicists and chemists has discovered that temperature behaves in strange and unexpected ways in graphene, a material that has scientists sizzling with excitement about its potential for new technological devices ranging from computing to medicine.

Imagine setting a frying pan on the stove and cranking up the heat, only to discover that in a few spots the butter isn't melting because part of the pan remains at room temperature.

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March 9 2015

The dark side of cosmology


It's a beautiful theory: the standard model of cosmology describes the universe using just six parameters. But it is also strange. The model predicts that dark matter and dark energy – two mysterious entities that have never been detected—make up 95% of the universe, leaving only 5% composed of the ordinary matter so essential to our existence.

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March 9 2015

What would life look like on Saturn's largest moon?


What are the essential ingredients for life? You might be tempted to list things like liquid water, oxygen, and nucleotides. But are these chemicals truly essential, or are you just thinking like a typical Earthling?

In a study published last week in the journal Science Advances, a team of chemical engineers at Cornell University decided to leave behind all preconceptions of the essentials of life, producing a model that is nothing like life as we know it.

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March 8 2015

One of the most Earth-like planets in our galaxy Gliese 581d 'really does exist,' astronomers say


Astronomers have found new evidence of the existence of an Earth-like planet that lies a comparative stone’s throw away from our solar system.

Discovery of the planet known as GJ 581d was heralded in 2007 but new research last year cast doubt on the claims, saying data used to find it was probably just misinterpreted signals from stars.

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March 8 2015

Did humans occupy Western US earlier than thought?


Archaeologists have uncovered a stone tool in Oregon that suggests humans occupied the western US earlier than thought.

The agate tool was uncovered under a thick layer of volcanic ash dating back to the eruption of Mount St Helens 15,800 years ago.

Scientists believe the primitive knife, discovered 12ft (3.6 metres) below ground, was used for cutting animal hides, butchering meat, and carving wood by pre-Clovis people.

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March 8 2015

25 Tons of Pigeon Poo Found in Medieval Monument


A medieval monument in England underwent a dramatic cleaning when a high pressure tanker sucked up about 25 tons of pigeon poo from the historic structure.

Measuring almost three feet deep, the bird droppings built up over decades inside the towers of the roofless 14th-century Landgate Arch in Rye, East Sussex.

Since there is no public access to the towers, the massive, mushy mess went unnoticed until last month, when members of the Rother District Council, which owns the ancient monument, made the stomach-turning finding.

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March 8 2015

Karnak Excavation Yields 38 Artifacts


The CNRS/Egyptian Ministry of State for Antiquities has just completed the excavation of a favissa, a pit discovered in early December 2014 near the temple of the god Ptah.

The dig has unearthed 38 statues, statuettes and precious objects, making this an exceptional find, both for the quantity and quality of the religious artifacts brought to light. Furthermore, a completely new recording method was used during the dig that makes it possible to virtually reconstruct each step of the discovery with millimeter accuracy.

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March 8 2015

Meet the "Monuments Men" Risking Everything to Save Syria's Ancient Treasures From ISIS


On February 26, ISIS released a video of its militants smashing ancient Assyrian artifacts in the central museum in Mosul, Iraq. In a matter of minutes, they jackhammered the face of a famous 1,400-year-old Assyrian winged bull and broke apart four 2,000-year-old statues of the kings of Hatra. That same week, insurgents from the so-called Islamic State burned thousands of rare books and manuscripts from Mosul's library.


Related: Nimrud: Outcry as IS bulldozers attack ancient Iraq site
Related: IS destroying another ancient archaeological site in Iraq

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