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December 13 2014

Eye-Tracking Technology Aims to Take Your Unconscious Pizza Order


If you prefer to order your pizza without going through all the trouble of actually speaking, Pizza Hut has just the thing for you—“the world’s first subconscious menu.” You sit down, glance through the menu, and before you say anything or even make a conscious decision, the menu has figured out which toppings you’d like on your pizza and places your order. Pizza Hut recently began testing the technology in some of its UK restaurants.

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December 13 2014

Earnings show less for left-handed, says study


Much has been thrown at left-handed people—they are quick to anger, quickly scared and, with the exception of heads of state, are more or less life's losers. Much too has been bestowed upon left-handed people—they are creative and score highly on certain tests. Obviously, scientists need to rely on more than popular notions to make connections, if any, between left-handed people and success.

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December 13 2014

BPA in Cans and Plastic Bottles Linked to Quick Rise in Blood Pressure


People who regularly drink from cans and plastic bottles may want to reconsider: A new study shows that a common chemical in the containers can seep into beverages and raise blood pressure within a few hours.


Related: That Takeout Coffee Cup May Be Messing With Your Hormones

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December 13 2014

Scientists make 'feel full' chemical


Scientists have created a chemical that can be added to food to make people feel full. Initial tests showed it helped people to eat less and slow weight gain.

It harnessed the power of a proprionate, which naturally makes us feel full when it is produced by breaking down fibre in the gut.

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December 13 2014

A pill for obesity? Stem cell scientists convert white fat to brown fat


Researchers have taken what they are describing as 'the first step toward a pill that can replace the treadmill' for the control of obesity -- though it, of course, would not provide all the additional benefits of exercise. The researchers have already identified two compounds that can accomplish that in human cells.

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December 13 2014

Could Drugs Heal A Broken Heart?


Love and heartache have always been inexorably tied. Recall the paranoid, lust-dizzy characters in A Midsummer Night’s Dream or the tortured, memory-deprived lovers in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Wouldn’t it be nice if a pill could take away the pain of a breakup? Researchers are looking into it.

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December 13 2014

Men really are more stupid than women, research shows


It's enough to start a new battle of the sexes, but when it comes to needless and untimely deaths, men win hands down.

A 20 year study of the Darwin Awards, an annual review of the most foolish way people have died, found almost 90 per cent were 'won' by males.


Alt: Study supports the theory that 'men are idiots'

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December 13 2014

Study: Women With More Male Friends Have More Sex Because Partners Fear ‘Sex Rivals’


Women who hang out with more male friends and co-workers have more frequent sex with their boyfriends than women who have fewer male influences in their life.

The study — published in the Journal of Comparative Psychology — finds that men often perceive their female partner’s abundance of male friends to be a form of “sperm competition psychology,” in which the men have more sex with their girlfriends due to the potential of “sex rivals.”.

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December 13 2014

Women's high heels influence male behaviour, says study


If a woman expects help and attention on the street, she ought to try wearing high-heels, suggests the author of French online journal Archives of Sexual Behaviour.

In a four-part sociological study, a group of researchers from the Université de Bretagne-Sud, in Lorient, conducted a range of experiments demonstrating that men behave more favourably towards a woman if she is wearing high-heeled shoes.


Alt: High heels scientifically proven to increase women’s attractiveness

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December 13 2014

Monkey-style 'bromance' helps macaques weather life's hard knocks


When it comes to weathering the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, male macaques get by with a little help from their fellow dudes, according to new research.

After getting the stink-eye stare from a dominant male or freezing their tail fur off in a cold cedar forest, male Barbary macaques who bonded with long-time male associates appear to suffer less stress than their loner counterparts.


Related: Horse trots into hospital: It's therapy, no joke

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December 13 2014

Worms' mental GPS helps them find food


You've misplaced your cell phone. You start by scanning where you remember leaving it: on your bureau. You check and double-check the bureau before expanding your search around and below the bureau. Eventually, you switch from this local area to a more global one, widening your search to the rest of your room and beyond.

When it comes to animals and food, a similar strategy is used to search for food.


Related: How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

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December 13 2014

Why Birds Don't Have Teeth


Birds — like anteaters, baleen whales and turtles — don't have teeth. But this wasn't always the case. The common ancestor of all living birds sported a set of pearly whites 116 million years ago, a new study finds.

In the study, researchers looked at the mutated remains of tooth genes in modern birds to figure out when birds developed "edentulism" — an absence of teeth. Ancient birds have left only a fragmented fossil record, but studying the genes of modern birds can help clarify how the bird lineage has changed over time.

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December 12 2014

As Above So Below - Do the Giza Monuments encode the date of the Younger Dryas comet impact?


The earth was hit by a comet around 12,800 years ago with globally cataclysmic effects that brought on an epoch of devastating, cold, darkness and floods known by geologists as the Younger Dryas. For the past seven years academics have been involved in such an intense dispute about whether or not the comet impact actually occurred that the implications of what it might have meant for the story of civilisation have not yet been considered at all.

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December 12 2014

Humans and birds share the same singing genes


It's not just great minds that think alike. Dozens of the genes involved in the vocal learning that underpins human speech are also active in some songbirds. And knowing this suggests that birds could become a standard model for investigating the genetics of speech production – and speech disorders.


Alt: New Family Tree Illuminates 'Big Bang' in Bird Evolution After Dinosaur Extinction

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December 12 2014

Scientists discover how birds localize sound sources


German researchers have figured out how birds locate the source of a sound even though they don’t have external ears.

Outer ears on mammals help the animal identify whether sounds are coming above, below or at the same level.

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December 12 2014

Evidence of early Norse metalwork in Canada


Archaeologists have found further evidence of a Viking presence in Arctic Canada.

Norse artefacts have been uncovered in mainland Canada and the Arctic islands over the past several decades.

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December 12 2014

Beer and Beef: Why the Vikings' Elaborate Feasts Died Out


Vikings have a reputation for their ruthless marauding ways, but new evidence from an ongoing archaeological dig shows that the Vikings who settled in Iceland spent more time brewing beer and basting beef than pillaging and plundering. These meals of beef and booze were served during elaborate feasts that were likely held as a strategy to gain some political footing in their new home, research suggests.

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