Alternative news
Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  next  >>>

 

October 7 2014

Thousands of Mountains Discovered on Ocean Floor


Scientists have discovered thousands of new mountains in the unlikeliest of places: The seafloor.

The seamounts — more specifically, underwater volcanoes — revealed themselves as part of a new ocean floor–mapping project conducted by researchers at California’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) and other organizations. The project also sheds light on how the continents were formed. The scientists published their research Friday (Oct. 3) in the journal Science.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Earth's ocean abyss has not warmed, NASA study finds


The cold waters of Earth's deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. But scientists say these findings do not throw suspicion on climate change itself.


Alt: Different depths reveal ocean warming trends

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Angry, Rolling Cloud Is First New Type in 60 Years


Undulatus asperatus isn’t some obscure anatomical structure next to your peritoneum, nor is it a minor character from the movie "Gladiator."

No, it’s actually a type of cloud formation that weather fanciers have proposed for inclusion in the next edition of the World Meteorological Organization’s “International Cloud Atlas,” the ultimate reference source on the varieties of clouds.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Scientists discover cancer-fighting berry on tree that only grows in Far North Queensland


Scientists have been surprised by the rapid cancer-fighting properties of a berry found only in Far North Queensland.

An eight-year study led by Dr Glen Boyle, from the QIMR Berghofer medical research institute in Brisbane, found a compound in the berry could kill head and neck tumours as well as melanomas.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops


Hardly a day passes without pundits crying for leadership in the NFL commissioner and team owners, among high-ranking government officials, and in other public figures. If experts didn’t have evidence that this valuable trait can be taught, they might join the collective swoon that’s engulfing much of the country.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Why are humans different heights? Scientists answer the long and short of height questions


Scientists have come closer to answering the question of why some children are destined to grow tall while others will end up shorter than average following a study that has identified hundreds of genetic mutations influencing human height.

Although genes have been known to be central to height for many years, researchers now believe they have found some of the key genetic elements that contribute to at least 20 per cent of the variation seen within the human population.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Why is educational achievement heritable?


The high heritability of exam grades reflects many genetically influenced traits such as personality, behavior problems, and self-efficacy and not just intelligence. The study looked at 13,306 twins at age 16 . The twins were assessed on a range of cognitive and non-cognitive measures, and the researchers had access to their GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) scores.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Chimps Show a Thirst for Learning


Wild chimpanzees in Uganda have been caught on tape developing a new drinking utensil: a mixture of moss and folded leaves that they place in their mouths and then dip into water.

Although it has long been understood that chimpanzees learn by observing one another, scientists say this is the first time humans have witnessed the origins of such behavior. A new study in the journal PLOS Biology describes the phenomenon and how the researchers watched it spreading from chimp to chimp.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

'Copycat' Bearded Dragons Mimic Their Peers


The scaly bearded dragon is the first reptile to show it can imitate a peer, and all for the price of a mealworm, new research suggests.

In a new study, researchers trained a 3-year-old female bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) how to open a sliding screen door with her head. Once successful, the lizard entered the doorway and ate a mealworm prize. Other bearded dragons then watched a video of the lizard opening the door, and scientists monitored whether the other animals imitated the behavior.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Birds colour-match their nests for camouflage


Now here's a clever design trick. Birds actively match the colour of their nests to their surroundings to blend in.

To test if birds choose to camouflage their nests or whether they are well-camouflaged simply because of the colour of available building tools, like twigs and leaves, Ida Bailey and her team at the University of St Andrews, UK, performed a spot of redecorating.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Sloth Bears Confirmed Extinct in Bangladesh


A massive project to assess the health of wildlife in Bangladesh has confirmed conservationists’ longstanding suspicions that sloth bears no longer exist in that country.

Sloth bears (Melursus ursinus) could once be found throughout India, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. (A separate subspecies lives on the island nation of Sri Lanka.) Overhunting during the British colonial rule caused all populations of this lanky, shaggy, white-snouted species to crash by the end of the 19th century.


Related: Earth has lost half of its wildlife in the past 40 years, says WWF

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Alternative Source of Tire Rubber Gains Traction


Rubber: there's nothing like the real thing. Manufacturers use synthetic rubber in toys and rubber bands and even passenger car tires, but higher performance products such as truck and aircraft tires demand the natural stuff. The problem is, almost all the natural rubber in the world comes from a single species of tree, Hevea brasiliensis, crops of which cannot be scaled up easily to meet future demand. So the tire industry, seeking a new source of natural rubber, has turned to a species that was last used in World War II: a flowering shrub known as Parthenium argentatum, or guayule.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

No need for water, enzymes are doing it for themselves


New research by scientists at the University of Bristol has challenged one of the key axioms in biology - that enzymes need water to function. The breakthrough could eventually lead to the development of new industrial catalysts for processing biodiesel.

Enzymes are large biological molecules that catalyse thousands of different chemical reactions that are essential for all life, from converting food into energy, to controlling how our cells replicate DNA.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 7 2014

Scientists create crystal which would allow us to breathe underwater


Being able to breathe underwater has long been a fascination for mankind, but the bulky oxygen tanks and face masks take some of the romance out of it.

They could soon no longer be needed however, thanks to the creation of the "Aquaman Crystal", or to use its proper name, "[{(bpbp)Co2II(NO3)}2(NH2bdc)](NO3)2 * 2H2O".

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 6 2014

Making oxygen before life: Oxygen can form directly from carbon dioxide in upper atmosphere


About one fifth of the Earth's atmosphere is oxygen, pumped out by green plants as a result of photosynthesis and used by most living things on the planet to keep our metabolisms running. Scientists have now shown that oxygen can be formed directly from carbon dioxide in the upper atmosphere, changing models of how the atmosphere evolved early in Earth's history.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 6 2014

Total Lunar Eclipse On Wednesday Will Be a Rare 'Selenelion'


Observers of Wednesday morning's total lunar eclipse might be able to catch sight of an extremely rare cosmic sight.

On Oct. 8, Interested skywatchers should attempt to see the total eclipse of the moon and the rising sun simultaneously. The little-used name for this effect is called a "selenelion," a phenomenon that celestial geometry says cannot happen.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
October 6 2014

Virgin Galactic 'On the Verge' of Private Space Launches, Richard Branson Says


One decade after a huge milestone in commercial spaceflight, British billionaire Sir Richard Branson thinks his spaceflight company Virgin Galactic's spaceship, is "on the verge" of another breakthrough in the industry.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

News desk archive...

Page:  <<<  prev  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default