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February 13 2015

Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds


They’re probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were.

But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are “definite” evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study.

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February 13 2015

Joe Rogan Experience #606 - Randall Carlson


Randall Carlson is a master builder and architectural designer, teacher, geometrician, geomythologist, geological explorer and renegade scholar. Here he joins Joe Rogan to discuss ancient climate change, and the mysteries of our past.


See also Graham's appearances on the Joe Rogan podcast

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February 12 2015

Did Ocean's Big Burps End Last Ice Age?


A massive outpouring of carbon dioxide from the deep ocean may have helped end the last ice age, scientists report today.

There is strong evidence that changes in Earth's orbit set the pace of the planet's ice ages, by altering how much sunlight reaches the Northern Hemisphere. Yet, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere also wobble with the advance and retreat of massive ice sheets, according to observations of ice cores and old ocean sediments. Carbon dioxide levels are lower during an ice age and higher when an ice age ends.

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February 12 2015

When Silicon Valley takes LSD


In Silicon Valley, there is a premium on creativity, and tools thought to induce or enhance it are avidly sought. Some view psychedelics as a weapon in the arsenal, a way to approach problems differently.


Related: Facebook will soon be able to ID you in any photo

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February 12 2015

Maybe Coin Tosses Aren't Entirely Random After All


The results of a coin toss are random--or so we thought. But a provocative new video from YouTube's Numberphile series turns that conventional wisdom on its head.

The video maintains that the ratio of getting heads vs. getting tails isn't 50/50. It's more like 51/49--with the coin more likely to come up the same way it started.

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February 12 2015

Popcorn's perfect recipe revealed


Scientists in France have worked out the critical temperature at which popcorn bursts.

They found that when the popcorn reached a threshold of 180C, the outer shell burst open regardless of the size and shape of the grain.


Alt: Researchers Finally Solve The Mystery Of Exactly How Popcorn Pops

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February 12 2015

Sugar Beets Make Hemoglobin


Hemoglobin is best known as red blood cells' superstar protein—carrying oxygen and other gases on the erythrocytes as they zip throughout the bodies of nearly all vertebrates. Less well known is its presence in vegetables, including the sugar beet, in which Nélida Leiva-Eriksson recently discovered the protein while working on her doctoral thesis at Lund University in Sweden.


Related: There’s Now an Onion That Doesn’t Make You Cry

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February 12 2015

Scientist duets with slime mould in an evening of plasmodium piano sonatas


It is perhaps the unlikeliest duet in musical history. And for one half of the pair – a single-celled organism that was among the first lifeforms to appear on Earth – it has been a long time coming.

A slime mould attached to a ground-breaking “biocomputer” will take centre stage at a music festival in Plymouth next month, where it will play the piano alongside the computer’s human creator.

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February 12 2015

Urban habitats 'provide haven' for bees


Britain's urban areas are home to more types of wild bee than farmland, a study has found.

Flowers planted in gardens and allotments provide a valuable food source for bees across the year, according to research.


Related: The monarch massacre: Nearly a billion butterflies have vanished

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February 12 2015

Crocodiles just wanna have fun, too


Turns out we may have more in common with crocodiles than we'd ever dream. According to research by a psychology professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, crocodiles think surfing waves, playing ball and going on piggyback rides are fun, too.

Vladimir Dinets, a research assistant professor in psychology, has studied crocodiles for a decade. While doing so, he has observed the animals engaging in play-like behavior.

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February 12 2015

Crows Understand Analogies


People are fascinated by the intelligence of animals. In fact, cave paintings dating back some 40,000 years suggest that we have long harbored keen interest in animal behavior and cognition. Part of that interest may have been practical: animals can be dangerous, they can be sources of food and clothing, and they can serve as sentries or mousers.

A recent research collaboration between Moscow State University and here at the University of Iowa has discovered that crows exhibit strong behavioral signs of analogical reasoning—the ability to solve puzzles like “bird is to air as fish is to what?”.

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February 12 2015

Genomes of Darwin’s finches may explain the shape of human faces


When the HMS Beagle dropped anchor off the Galápagos archipelago in 1835, Charles Darwin was struck by the fact that each small island seemed to be home to a unique finch. The birds he collected—later found to belong to 15 distinct species of the subfamily Geospizinae—helped shape his ideas on evolution and became a textbook example of how species can adapt to new environments.

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February 12 2015

Smokers have thinner brain cortex and could have impaired thinking


A key part of the brain that is needed for thinking skills is smaller in smokers, new research has found. The findings show that smoking has an impact on brain functioning — as well as the heart and lungs.

The outer brain layer or brain cortex is thinner in smokers, researchers have found. And while some of the thickness might come back after they quit, that might not happen.

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February 12 2015

The U.S. government is poised to withdraw longstanding warnings about cholesterol


The nation’s top nutrition advisory panel has decided to drop its caution about eating cholesterol-laden food, a move that could undo almost 40 years of government warnings about its consumption.

The group’s finding that cholesterol in the diet need no longer be considered a “nutrient of concern” stands in contrast to the committee’s findings five years ago, the last time it convened.


Alt: Low-fat diet advice was based on undercooked science

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February 12 2015

The powerful cheat for themselves, the powerless cheat for others


Research has previously shown that upper-class individuals are more likely to behave unethically than lower-class people. But, says David Dubois, lead researcher of a new paper in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, it’s not that simple: both groups behave unethically in different contexts.

Dubois’ research group found that people with higher socioeconomic status (SES) were more likely to behave unethically when the behavior benefitted themselves, while lower-SES people were more likely to be unethical to benefit other individuals.

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February 12 2015

How Hot Peppers Can Ease Pain


Capsaicin—a substance in chili pepper plants that makes them spicy hot—exerts its pain- attenuating effects by triggering a signaling cascade that results in the inactivation of mechano-sensitive transmembrane channels in neurons.


Related: Manly men like it hot!

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February 12 2015

What If Alexander the Great Left His Empire to One Person?


As Alexander the Great lay on his deathbed in 323 B.C., his generals reportedly asked to whom he left his empire. "To the strongest," Alexander said, according to historians.

"And, of course, they all started fighting about who the strongest was".


Related: For Italians, a Lingering Superiority Complex About Roman Empire

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