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March 3 2014

Scientists Are Actually Trying to Revive Extinct Animals, Jurassic Park-Style


De-extinction scientists are planning to bring long-extinct, giant creatures that once roamed the Earth back and put them in a theme park.

And no, that’s not a description of Jurassic Park’s premise.

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March 3 2014

New Clues to Neanderthal-Modern Human Interbreeding


It is almost common knowledge now, thanks to recent DNA studies, that many non-African humans living today have traces of Neanderthal DNA within their genomes --- the evidence, according to geneticists, that anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens) interbred with their contemporary Neanderthal species cousins tens of thousands of years ago in places where they coexisted in present-day Europe and Asia.

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March 2 2014

Neanderthals cleared of driving mammoths over cliff in mass slaughter


Heaps of mammoth and woolly rhino bones found piled up at the foot of a cliff were thought to be the grim results of Neanderthals driving the beasts over the edge.

The piles of bones are a major feature at La Cotte de St Brelade on Jersey, one of the most spectacular Neanderthal sites in Europe. But the claim that they mark the remains of mass slaughter has been all but ruled out by a fresh investigation.

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March 2 2014

No, Medieval people didn't drink booze to avoid dirty water


It seems to be common wisdom that Europeans in the Middle Ages drank primarily beer and wine because water wasn't generally safe to drink. This, however, is a rather persistent myth as water was a regular part of the Medieval diet.

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March 2 2014

Ancient Roman sarcophagus lid, believed stolen, turns up in Queens warehouse


An ancient Roman marble sarcophagus lid of a woman laying on a couch showed up in a warehouse in Queens, earlier this month — and federal investigators think it was stolen.

Today they plan to seize the lid that is believed to have been stolen by Gianfranco Becchina, an Italian antiques dealer who operated a gallery in Switzerland until he was convicted of trafficking thousands of Roman artifacts in 2011.

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March 2 2014

Seeking Answers to an Ancient Mystery


Called 'Globetrotter', a powerful technique has produced an interactive genetic roadmap for understanding how human population interbreeding has illucidated our ancestral connections and even uncovered human events previously undocumented in history.

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March 2 2014

How Earth might have looked: How a failed Saharan Atlantic Ocean rift zone sculped Africa's margin


Break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana about 130 Million years ago could have led to a completely different shape of the African and South American continent with an ocean south of today’s Sahara desert, as geoscientists have shown through the use of sophisticated plate tectonic and three-dimensional numerical modelling.

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March 2 2014

Japan launches net into space to help with orbital debris


Nearly 60 years after the USSR launched Spunik I -- and more than 4,900 space launches later -- a number of objects now circle the Earth. Scientists track nearly 20,000 pieces of space debris that are said to be larger than a softball, but it is estimated that close to 500,000 pieces of untrackable debris -- perhaps millions of the smallest size -- exist in orbit as well. If a single, marble-sized piece of orbital debris were to hit a functional, orbiting spacecraft -- as seen in the movie, "Gravity" -- the results would be catastrophic.

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March 2 2014

Japan researchers testing tiny ear computer


A tiny personal computer that is worn on the ear and can be controlled with the blink of an eye or the click of a tongue is being tested in Japan.

The 17-gram (0.59-ounce) wireless device has bluetooth capability and is equipped with a GPS, compass, gyro-sensor, battery, barometer, speaker and microphone.

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March 2 2014

Finally, A Strip-Proof Screw


The common screw may not have been screaming for a makeover, but consider its shortcomings: stripped heads, tedious pilot holes, endless bit swapping. The company Outlaw has developed a new fastening system that cures all those headaches and could unseat the Phillips head as the bench standard.

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March 2 2014

Peat soils as gigantic batteries


Wetlands, including peatlands, have a high content of humic substances, which are organic compounds that form during incomplete decomposition of biomass. Under anoxic conditions, soil bacteria can use these organic compounds during respiration as electron acceptors. Many organisms (including us humans) instead use oxygen as the electron acceptor.

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March 2 2014

Could Sugar Power Cell Phones Of The Future?


Researchers are charged up about biobatteries, devices able to harness common biological processes to generate electricity. Most biobatteries are unable to generate large amounts of power, but researchers recently developed a prototype version that has the potential to be lighter and more powerful than the batteries typically found in today's portable electronic devices, including smartphones.

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March 2 2014

Baby's Rare Brain Tumor Had Teeth


A 4-month-old infant in Maryland may be the first person to have had teeth form in his brain as a result of a specific type of rare brain tumor, according to a new report of the case.

The boy is doing well now that his tumor has been removed, and doctors say the case sheds light on how these rare tumors develop.

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March 2 2014

Near Wins Stoke Gamblers’ Brains


Almost doesn’t count when it comes to slot machines, but our brains like to imagine it does. A study into brain wave activity by researches at the University of Exeter, in England, and Swansea University, in Wales, has found that the brains of gamblers responded nearly as enthusiastically to almost winning as when the machines actually struck the jackpot.

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March 2 2014

Studying the Birth of a New Language


While working in schools in northern Australia, Carmel O’Shannessy realized the children there had invented an entirely new language.

The indigenous village of Lajamanu, population 600, sits on the southern edge of the subtropics of northern Australia.

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March 2 2014

Global riot epidemic due to demise of cheap fossil fuels


If anyone had hoped that the Arab Spring and Occupy protests a few years back were one-off episodes that would soon give way to more stability, they have another thing coming. The hope was that ongoing economic recovery would return to pre-crash levels of growth, alleviating the grievances fueling the fires of civil unrest, stoked by years of recession.

But this hasn't happened.

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March 2 2014

Crime rates could rise as climate change bites


In a warmer world it might be best not to leave your windows open. As temperatures rise, so do crime rates, suggesting climate change will lead to millions of extra offences in the coming decades. However, factors such as better policing may keep a lid on the problem.

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March 2 2014

Northern lights visit southern UK


For one night only the northern lights came south, seen in spectacular displays of green, pink and crimson as far south as Essex and Jersey.

The light show by the aurora borealis on Thursday night – the result of an unusually clear, cold night combined with a strong solar storm – was also seen in many parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland, and across the north and east coasts of England.

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