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March 5 2014

Elephants Landscaped Ice Age Europe Into a Park


Extinct long-tusked elephants, rhinos and other giant plant-eaters may have landscaped prehistoric Europe into a mixture of open park-like spaces and clumps of forests, until humans came on the scene, new research finds.

Ecologists recently examined beetle fossils for hints of hungry mega-gardeners’ influence on the environment, along with signs that the ecosystem radically changed when humans expanded into Europe.

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March 5 2014

When Trilobites Ruled the World


WASHINGTON — Trilobites may be the archetypal fossils, symbols of an archaic world long swept beneath the ruthless road grader of time. But we should all look so jaunty after half a billion years.

At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Brian T. Huber, chairman of paleobiology, points to a flawless specimen of Walliserops, a five-inch trilobite that swam the Devonian seas around what is now Morocco some 150 million years before the first dinosaurs hatched.

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March 5 2014

New Texts Found in 'Dead Sea Scroll' Caves


An archaeologist says he discovered nine tiny scrolls with biblical text from the Qumran caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were unearthed, according to news reports.

The newfound scrolls, which date back to about 2,000 years ago, were hidden inside three leather tefillin cases, also known as phylacteries, traditionally carried by observant Jewish men.

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March 5 2014

Talking Neanderthals challenge the origins of speech


We humans like to think of ourselves as unique for many reasons, not least of which being our ability to communicate with words. But ground-breaking research by an expert from the University of New England shows that our ‘misunderstood cousins,’ the Neanderthals, may well have spoken in languages not dissimilar to the ones we use today.

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March 4 2014

X-ray analysis suggests Neanderthals spoke languages similar to our own


Researchers have found evidence to suggest that Neanderthals may have spoken languages not too different from ones currently used by humans.

Scientists at the University of New England used 3-D X-ray imaging to examine the hyoid bone from 60,000-year-old Neanderthal remains discovered about 25 years ago in Israel.

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March 4 2014

Neanderthals may have helped East Asians adapting to sunlight


Hominins and their closest living relative, chimpanzees, diverged approximately 6.5 million years ago on African continent. Fossil evidence suggests hominins have migrated away from Africa at least twice since then. Crania of the first wave of migrants, such as Neanderthals in Europe and Peking Man in East Asia, show distinct morphological features that are different from contemporary humans (also known as Homo sapiens sapiens).

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March 4 2014

30,000-year-old virus from permafrost is reborn


French scientists said Monday they had revived a giant but harmless virus that had been locked in the Siberian permafrost for more than 30,000 years.

Wakening the long-dormant virus serves as a warning that unknown pathogens entombed in frozen soil may be roused by global warming, they said.

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March 4 2014

Plants convert energy at lightning speed


A new way of measuring how much light a plant can tolerate could be useful in growing crops resilient to a changing climate, according to scientists from Queen Mary University of London.

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March 4 2014

Live fast, die young strategy spawned Amazon tree boom


A "live fast, die young" life history strategy could have been a key factor behind today's high tree diversity in the Amazon, scientists have suggested.

The researchers hope the findings will shed light on why some groups of trees in the biodiversity hotspot contain hundreds of species.

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March 4 2014

New articles on GrahamHancock.com


Precious Metals vs. Precious Life: Destruction of the Amazon by Sergey Baranov

Sky Cults and UFO Encounters in Ancient Egypt by Xaviant Haze

How to visit Ancient Sites - Mindfulness & Meditation by Gary Evans

The Connection of Fractals, Sound and the Solar System by David Carr

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March 4 2014

Could mushrooms be the cure for cancer?


Behold the mighty mushroom. Neither plant nor animal, the mysterious fungus is a class, or kingdom, of its own, and has fascinated cultures around the world for centuries. But while they do make a tasty omelette filling, does the real magic of mushrooms lie not in their flavour, but in their potential to combat one of our biggest killers – cancer?

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March 4 2014

Study of antibody evolution charts course toward HIV vaccine


In an advance for HIV vaccine research, a scientific team has discovered how the immune system makes a powerful antibody that blocks HIV infection of cells by targeting a site on the virus called V1V2. Many researchers believe that if a vaccine could elicit potent antibodies to a specific conserved site in the V1V2 region, one of a handful of sites that remains constant on the fast-mutating virus, then the vaccine could protect people from HIV infection.

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March 4 2014

Great Ormond Street doctors aim to grow ears from fat


Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London are aiming to reconstruct people's faces with stem cells taken from their fat.

The team has grown cartilage in the laboratory and believe it could be used to rebuild ears and noses.

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March 4 2014

Spending more time in the dark could boost hearing in old age


In the Marvel Comic Daredevil our eponymous hero is the victim of a radioactive spill, leaving him blind but also with an extraordinary heightening of his other senses, particularly hearing.

For Julie, her superhuman hearing isn't the result of radioactivity, but is instead due to the reorganisation of neurons in her brain, enhancing her sense of hearing after the loss of her sight at the age of 16.

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March 4 2014

Women's Brains More Resilient


Women are able to carry higher levels of genetic defects without getting brain development disorders such as autism, supporting the possibility of a "female protective effect," finds a new study.

The study gives clues as to why 50 percent more males typically have an intellectual disability than females, and why boys are four times more likely to have autism than girls.

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March 4 2014

The Scary New Evidence on BPA-Free Plastics


Each night at dinnertime, a familiar ritual played out in Michael Green's home: He'd slide a stainless steel sippy cup across the table to his two-year-old daughter, Juliette, and she'd howl for the pink plastic one. Often, Green gave in. But he had a nagging feeling. As an environmental-health advocate, he had fought to rid sippy cups and baby bottles of the common plastic additive bisphenol A (BPA), which mimics the hormone estrogen and has been linked to a long list of serious health problems.

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March 4 2014

Nepal to force Everest climbers to collect rubbish


Climbers scaling Mount Everest will have to bring back eight kilograms (17.6 pounds) of garbage under new rules designed to clean up the world's highest peak, a Nepalese official said Monday.

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March 4 2014

Iron Man-like Exosuit to Expand Ocean Exploration


Scientists have long believed that organisms and chemical compounds found in the ocean's depths could help them solve many medical mysteries . The greatest challenge has been access. The bioluminescent creatures of interest live hundreds of meters down and cannot survive at surface pressure. Yet neuroscientists interested in studying possible connections between patterns of bioluminescence and human brain activity don’t have the equipment needed to observe deep-sea fish in their native environment.

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