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November 3 2014

How Unconditional Love Helps Kids with Setbacks


Teens who spend some time thinking about situations in which their peers thought well of them, no matter what they did, may have an easier time coping with setbacks, new findings show.

Adolescents in the study who wrote an essay about a time when they felt "unconditional regard" from their peers had fewer negative feelings about themselves after getting a bad report card than kids who wrote about a time when they felt their peers' regard was "conditional," the researchers found.

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November 3 2014

Why you should always make important decisions on an empty stomach.


If you’re anything like me, you get pretty grumpy when you’re hungry (a condition also known as “hangry“). However, according to this study, being hungry also helps you make better decisions. To test this, the researchers forced subjects to fast for a night. When the subjects arrived at the laboratory the next day, the scientists served some of them breakfast, but made the others wait. All of them then took the “Iowa Gambling Task”, a psychological test based on gambling that is supposed to simulate real-life decision making.

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November 3 2014

CT scans ‘unwrap’ secrets of three mummies


Scientists have put three unusually motionless patients through the CT scanner: Egyptian mummies.

One of the mummies already was known to have a brain, but scans revealed she also still has lungs. In many mummies, lungs typically were removed prior to burial.


Alt: Three Egyptian mummies receive CT scans

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November 3 2014

Pharaoh Thutmosis-era temple found by accident in Egypt


A group of suspected looters unearthed a 3,400-year-old underwater temple buried under a house in the Nile Delta.

The temple, which was found 40km from Cairo in the town of Badrashin, dates from the time of Pharaoh Thutmosis III, one of Egypt’s greatest warrior kings.

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November 3 2014

A Beacon in the Land of Pharaohs: What the Great Pyramid Looked Like More than 4000 Years Ago


Though I've never had the pleasure to visit Egypt and contemplate the massive splendor of the Great Pyramid (yet), modern tourists will never truly grasp why sheer size and geometric perfection weren't the only things that made this monument the biggest wonder of the Ancient World.

That's because what remains of the pyramid attributed to the pharaoh Khufu is now almost completely devoid of its outer layer of highly polished limestone blocks.

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November 3 2014

New Artifact-Filled Chambers Revealed under Teotihuacan


Scientists with the Mexican government announced Wednesday the discovery of three new chambers at the end of a tunnel under the ancient city of Teotihuacan. The tunnel was discovered in 2003 beneath the popular tourist destination just outside today’s Mexico City and is among the most important finds in the lost city’s history.

In a press briefing at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, Mexican archeologists say that the new rooms contained thousands of objects, including carved statues, rubber balls, jade from Guatemala and a wooden box of shells.

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November 3 2014

From Ancient DNA, a Clearer Picture of Europeans Today


About 50,000 years ago, humans from Africa first set foot in Europe. They hunted woolly mammoths and other big game — sometimes to extinction. Eventually, they began grazing livestock and raising crops.

They chopped down forests and drained swamps, turning villages into towns, then cities and capitals of empires. But even as they altered the Continent, Europeans changed, too.

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November 3 2014

Researchers evolve a molecule that flips the orientation of life


Even the simplest forms of life, like bacteria, have a handedness, one that's built into the chemicals they're composed of. The complex, three-dimensional molecules that are essential to life can have the same exact set of atoms, yet be physically distinct—one the mirror image of the other. Almost all the amino acids that life uses have a single orientation; same with the sugars.

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November 3 2014

An infinite multiverse: a bad idea or inescapable?


Earlier this week, a cultural center in Red Hook, Brooklyn played host to the sort of debate that's usually reserved for smoke-filled dorm rooms: do we live in a multiverse and, if so, is there another you out there?

But rather than mind-altered undergrads, the debate took place among three physicists, one of whom happens to have a Nobel Prize sitting back home.

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November 3 2014

Time travel and teleporting 'a reality for today's children'


Move over Marty McFly - time travel, invisibility cloaks and teleporting could all happen within today's schoolchildren's lifetimes, experts agree.

Children could be travelling between centuries as soon as the year 2100, while teleportation could become a regular occurence by around 2080, professors from Imperial College London and the University of Glasgow have said.

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November 3 2014

Science Looks into Immortal Pets


Yeast, worms and mice: all have lived longer when treated with various chemical compounds in laboratory tests. But many promising leads have failed when tried in humans. This week, researchers are proposing a different approach to animal testing of life-extending drugs: trials in pet dogs. Their target is rapamycin, which is used clinically as part of an anti-rejection drug cocktail after kidney transplants and which has also been shown to extend the lives of mice by 13% in females and 9% in males.

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November 3 2014

Monkey Puzzle


Monkeys, much like young children, can work out abstract properties of objects by looking at them, according to the latest research.

In a new study by scientists at the University of St Andrews, it was found that non-human primates share the same basic knowledge as a three-year-old child in their understanding of objects.

The researchers behind the study, of capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and bonobos, say that the results suggest that there is more to their world than meets the eye.

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November 3 2014

Can parents make their kids smarter?


Reading bedtime stories, engaging in conversation and eating nightly dinners together are all positive ways in which parents interact with their children, but according to new research, none of these actions have any detectable influence on children's intelligence later in life. A criminology professor examined a nationally representative sample of youth alongside a sample of adopted children and found evidence to support the argument that IQ is not the result of parental socialization.

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November 3 2014

Scientists show IQs on the rise


Human intelligence is thought to improve with each generation and a unique study of people born and raised in Aberdeen has proved that those in north-east Scotland are getting smarter.

The research by scientists at the University of Aberdeen and NHS Grampian has been published in the academic journal Intelligence.

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November 3 2014

Rationing in World War 2 increased intelligence of Britons


This image of children munching gloomily on carrot sticks because there was no ice-cream during World War 2 is a bleak reminder of how rationing dulled eating habits in Britain.

But what these children did not realise is that the enforced austerity actually made them smarter.

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November 3 2014

GPS back-up: World War Two technology employed


Technology developed during World War Two is to be used as a back-up for GPS.

The General Lighthouse Authorities (GLA) have announced that they have installed a system called eLoran in seven ports across Britain.

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November 2 2014

The Leonardo hidden from Hitler in case it gave him magic powers


One of the world's most famous self-portraits is going on rare public display in the northern Italian city of Turin. Very little is known about the 500-year-old, fragile, fading red chalk drawing of Leonardo da Vinci but some believe it has mystical powers.

There is a myth in Turin that the gaze of Leonardo da Vinci in this self-portrait is so intense that those who observe it are imbued with great strength.

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