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January 22 2015

Ageing research: Blood to blood


By splicing animals together, scientists have shown that young blood rejuvenates old tissues. Now, they are testing whether it works for humans.

Two mice perch side by side, nibbling a food pellet. As one turns to the left, it becomes clear that food is not all that they share — their front and back legs have been cinched together, and a neat row of sutures runs the length of their bodies, connecting their skin. Under the skin, however, the animals are joined in another, more profound way: they are pumping each other's blood.

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January 22 2015

Growing Human Kidneys in Rats Sparks Ethical Debate


Researchers say they have developed a new technique that will get more kidneys to people who need transplants, but the method is sure to be controversial: The research shows that it is feasible to remove a kidney from an aborted human fetus, and implant the organ into a rat, where the kidney can grow to a larger size.

It's possible that further work could find a way to grow kidneys large enough that they could be transplanted into a person, the researchers said, although much more research is needed to determine whether this could be done.

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January 22 2015

First round-the-world solar flight to take off next month


ABU DHABI (Reuters) - A plane powered by the sun will attempt an unprecedented flight around the world next month, the project's founders said, seeking to prove that flying is possible without using fossil fuel.

Solar Impulse 2 is set to take off from Abu Dhabi with stopovers in India, Myanmar and China before crossing the Pacific Ocean and flying across the United States and southern Europe to arrive back in Abu Dhabi.

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January 22 2015

Artificial intelligence helps Stanford physicists predict dangerous solar flares


Solar flares can release the energy equivalent of many atomic bombs, enough to cut out satellite communications and damage power grids on Earth, 93 million miles away. The flares arise from twisted magnetic fields that occur all over the sun's surface, and they increase in frequency every 11 years, a cycle that is now at its maximum.

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January 22 2015

Mystery storms rage across face of Uranus


STORMS have clouded Uranus's normally placid face. In the past year, the gas planet has played host to huge cloud systems so bright that even amateur astronomers can see them from Earth – and their cause is a mystery.

"We have no idea. It's very unexpected," says Imke de Pater at the University of California, Berkeley.

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January 22 2015

Researchers find levels of nitrogen in meteorites similar to levels in Earth's atmosphere


A trio of researchers in Germany has found levels of nitrogen in carlsbergite in two meteorite samples match levels found in the human body and the Earth's atmosphere. In their paper published in Nature Geoscience, Dennis Harries, Falko Langenhorst and Peter Hoppe with Universität Bayreuth, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena and Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie respectively describe their analyses of two primitive meteorites found in Antarctica in 1979, and offer theories as to how nitrogen levels found in them came to be there.

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January 22 2015

Meteorite is 'hard drive' from space


Researchers have decoded ancient recordings from fragments of an asteroid dating back billions of years to the start of the Solar System.

They found tiny "space magnets" in meteorites which retain a memory of the birth and death of the asteroid's core.

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January 22 2015

Japan might get to name the most alien worlds


Who gets to name exoplanets? As efforts to officially christen alien worlds gets under way, it looks like Japanese astronomy fans will get the deciding vote.

Currently, planets outside the solar system are saddled with dull scientific designations like GJ 667 Cc or HD 40307 g. Last year the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the scientific body that oversees cosmic naming rights, announced its NameExoWorlds contest to give the public a chance to choose more evocative names for a handful of exoplanets out of more than 1800 discovered so far.

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January 22 2015

Esa favours moon not Mars for next crewed mission


The European Space Agency has outlined its vision for what lunar exploration could be in the future in a new video released onto the internet today. It comes in the wake of a decision to look into collaborating with the Russians over sending a lander to the Moon’s south pole.


Alt: Could humans live on the dark side of the moon? European space chiefs outline ambitious vision for colonies to settle on the lunar surface

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January 22 2015

Closer to Self-Destruction? Doomsday Clock Could Move Tomorrow


The ominous hands of the "Doomsday Clock" have been fixed at 5 minutes to midnight for the past three years. But they could move tomorrow.

Tomorrow (Jan. 22), at a news conference in Washington, D.C., The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists will announce where the hands will rest for 2015.

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January 22 2015

Vinegar-Like Acid Rain May Have Fallen During Earth’s Worst Extinction


Roughly a quarter of a billion years ago, an apocalypse struck the Earth. Known as the Great Dying, it claimed more lives than any other mass extinction known to science, including the one that did in the non-avian dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Over 90 percent of all species on the planet were wiped out, from armor-clad trilobites in the oceans to giant reptiles on land. The host of strange creatures vanished, giving way to the ancestors of modern flora and fauna.

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January 22 2015

Huge crocodile-like reptile roamed the Earth before dinosaurs took over


A new prehistoric giant reptile has been found. The giant crocodile-like animal was 9 feet long, had huge teeth like steak knives and roamed the world before dinosaurs took over it.

It has bony plates on its back, like a crocodile, and legs that lie underneath the body.

The new animal, known as Nundasuchus, was found by a researcher at Virginia Tech. It is not a dinosaur, but one of the large reptiles that roamed the Earth before dinosaurs took over it.

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January 22 2015

'Living Fossil' Frilled Shark Caught Off Australia


A rare frilled shark, whose species dates back 80 million years, was caught in a fishing trawler off Australia's coast.

"It's a freaky thing," Simon Boag, the chief executive officer at South East Trawl Fishing Association, told Australia's ABC Rural. "I don't think you would want to show it to little children before they went to bed."

The association said the frilled shark is often referred to as a "living fossil.".

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January 22 2015

Remains of the Fire Mummies: Ancient Ibaloi people SMOKED their dead 1,000 years ago


A dark cave thousands of feet up the side of a remote mountain in the Philippines is the final resting place of these curious corpses known as 'fire mummies'.

The Ibaloi people, an ancient race from the Philippines, smoked their dead dry for months to mummify them - giving them their firey nickname.

The preserved remains lie in dark caverns 4,000ft up the side of Mount Timbac, near Kabayan in the province of Benguet, 200 miles north of capital Manila.

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January 22 2015

Evidence for ancient bone surgery found at Kuelap Fortress


A study by the University of Florida published in the International Journal of Paleopathology claims to have discovered the first ever evidence for ancient bone surgery found in Peru.

Dr. J Maria Toyne details that two skeletons (dated 800-1535 CE) from the pre-Colombian site of Kuelap demonstrate pathology similar to trepanation. Trepanation is the surgical practice of drilling holes into bones and is the oldest example of surgical intervention.

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January 22 2015

15th-Century Irish Town Found Near Medieval Castle


The medieval Dunluce Castle, located on the craggy rocks of Northern Ireland's coast, is neighbors with a mysterious stone settlement, according to a recent excavation.

The castle dates back to the 15th century, and once housed the powerful MacQuillan family, which controlled a large amount of territory in Northern Ireland. On a recent dig, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency planned to uncover part of the lost 17th century town of Dunluce near the castle. But instead, archaeologists stumbled upon an earlier settlement that dates back to the 15th and 16th centuries.

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January 21 2015

Words emerge from ancient scrolls charred during eruption of Vesuvius


Ancient scrolls that were burned black and buried in ash from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius nearly two thousand years ago have begun to give up their secrets.

Researchers in Italy used a powerful x-ray procedure to read out the first words from two of the Roman scrolls, which belong to the only library to have survived from the ancient world.


Alt: New Tech Could Reveal Secrets in 2,000-Year-Old Scrolls

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