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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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November 10 2014

Ford Police Cruisers Now Tattle When Cops Drive Like Jerks


Everyone’s seen a cop driving like a jerk: Double parking and blocking traffic. Cruising down the highway way beyond the speed limit, with no suspect to run down. Blatantly texting while driving. Pulling the old turn-on-the-siren-just-long-enough-to-run-the-red-light trick. And for anyone who’s fantasized about making a citizen’s arrest of one of their city’s finest, police departments soon will be able to track how their cops are driving, and when they’re behaving badly.

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November 10 2014

That Time When Scientists Zapped Braille Directly Into People's Brains


During the 1970s, while bell-bottoms roamed the earth and The Dark Side of the Moon played on records, scientists were communicating images directly to the brains of blind people. What's more, they were intelligible images.


Related: Entrepreneur, 13, gets Intel funding for low-cost Braille printer

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November 9 2014

Direct brain interface between humans


Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team's initial demonstration a year ago. In the newly published study, which involved six people, researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person's brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of another person within a split second of sending that signal.

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November 9 2014

Scientists recruit robo-roaches for search and rescue


The thought of an intelligent cockroach that's been hard-wired to hunt you down might give you nightmares – or at least leave you feeling a little queasy.

Researchers at North Carolina State University are turning cockroaches into "biobots" that can help pinpoint the location of survivors at disaster sites, such as under the rubble of a collapsed building.

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November 9 2014

3D Printed Aquapura Filters Saltwater: Kickstarter Campaign Aims to End World’s Fresh Water Shortage


Frederick Janson plans to use 3D printing in facing one of the oldest and biggest challenges of the world: providing more fresh drinking water to the masses.

With over 98% of the world’s water in the form of saltwater, the obvious plan of attack is in converting that to fresh water. How difficult could it be to remove salt from fresh water? It sounds very easy with theAquapura, which operates on the very simple principle of using heat in a multi-chambered unit to separate water from salt.

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November 9 2014

Why Google’s Cancer-Detecting Pill Is More Than Just Hype


Before Google started work on a pill that aims to detect cancers and other diseases by sending magnetic nanoparticles into your bloodstream, it talked to Sam Gambhir.

Gambhir is a professor of radiology, bioengineering, and materials science at Stanford University and the director of the university’s Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection—a researcher at the forefront of a movement that seeks to identify cancers far sooner than we do today.


Related: Brain barrier opened for first time to treat cancer

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November 9 2014

How Wikipedia Data Is Revolutionizing Flu Forecasting


Epidemiologist want to forecast disease like meteorologists forecast rain. And the way people browse Wikipedia could be the key, they say.

This time last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta launched a competition to find the best way to forecast the characteristics of the 2013-2014 influenza season using data gathered from the internet. Today, Kyle Hickmann from Los Alamos National Laboratories in New Mexico and a few pals reveal the results of their model which used real-time data from Wikipedia to forecast the ground truth data gathered by the CDC that surfaces about two weeks later.

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November 9 2014

Plant protein could be used for blood, say scientists


A protein found in sugar beet could be used as a blood substitute to help tackle the shortage of blood, researchers in Sweden suggest.

Haemoglobin is the protein that carries oxygen in blood and the team say plant and human versions are very similar.

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November 9 2014

This algae farm eats highway pollution


Putting an algae farm on top of a busy highway might sound bizarre, but this thriving farm in Switzerland is actively filtering pollution from the air.

Plant-like microorganisms called algae are pretty interesting little creatures - some species form expansive 'algal blooms' that harm the environment, whereas others can be used to produce biofuel and food sources. Some can even infect humans and mess with their brains.

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November 9 2014

Pollution halves India's potential grain yield: Study


Air pollution seems to have a direct and negative impact on grain production in India, a US study warned on Monday, with recent increases in smog decreasing projected yields by half.

Analysing 30 years of data, scientists developed a statistical model suggesting that air pollution caused wheat yields in densely populated states to be 50% lower than what they could have been in 2010.


Related: ADHD-air pollution link: Breathing dirty air during pregnancy raises odds of childhood ADHD-related behavior problems

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November 9 2014

Body weight heavily influenced by gut microbes: Genes shape body weight by affecting gut microbes


Our genetic makeup influences whether we are fat or thin by shaping which types of microbes thrive in our body, according to a new study. Scientists identified a specific, little known bacterial family that is highly heritable and more common in individuals with low body weight.


Related: High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice
Related: Vegan Diets Are Best for Weight Loss

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November 9 2014

Little Free Libraries start sprouting in Detroit


The first of 20 new tiny libraries for Detroit was installed Thursday near a park on the city’s west side.

During a ceremonial dig, a small, glass-enclosed wooden box was erected next to the North Rosedale Park Community House. Todd Bol, who founded the Little Free Libraries movement, hauled the libraries in a trailer from his home in Wisconsin.

The little libraries are erected in public places and filled with donated books; passersby are urged to take one or leave one.

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November 9 2014

The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling


When an English archaeologist named George Smith was 31 years old, he became enchanted with an ancient tablet in the British Museum. Years earlier, in 1845, when Smith was only a five-year-old boy, Austen Henry Layard, Henry Rawlinson, and Hormuzd Rassam began excavations across what is now Syria and Iraq. In the subsequent years they discovered thousands of stone fragments, which they later discovered made up 12 ancient tablets. But even after the tablet fragments had been pieced together, little had been translated. The 3,000-year-old tablets remained nearly as mysterious as when they had been buried in the ruins of Mesopotamian palaces.

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November 9 2014

Witchmarks to protect King James I from evil found at Knole


A series of eerie symbols and markings have been discovered under the floorboards of one of Britain’s most important historic houses, scratched into the wood to protect King James I from witches.

The so-called witchmarks were found under the floorboards in a bedroom at Knole, the huge stately home in Kent, during an archaeological survey. They were dated to the early 17th century, when hysteria over witchcraft had reached fever pitch.


Alt: 'Demon Traps' Found in 17th-Century English House

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November 9 2014

2,000-year-old youth organization


In Roman Egypt, 14-year-old boys were enrolled in a youth organisation to learn to be good citizens.

This is according to social historian and historian of idea, Ville Vuolanto, of the University of Oslo, who has joined Dr. April Pudsey, from the University of Newcastle to delve deep into the vast array of material of about 7,500 ancient documents written on papyrus. The texts include literary texts, personal letters and administrative documents. Never before has childhood been researched so systematically in this type of material.

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November 9 2014

Illegal Dig Of 3,400 Year-Old Temple Lands Seven People In Jail


An Egyptian family recently found the remains of a 3,400 year-old temple underneath their home. So they did what any would-be archaeologists would do: They started digging. They've now been arrested by the police for illegal excavation.

As Egyptian newspaper Al Ahram reports, the find was made two weeks ago. But instead of reporting it to the proper authorities, the seven residents of the Giza district started to conduct their own excavation.

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November 9 2014

Population boom and droughts contributed to collapse of ancient Assyrian Empire


Researchers see parallels between decline of Assyrian civilisation and today’s turmoil in Syria and Iraq.

There’s more to the decline of the once mighty ancient Assyrian Empire than just civil wars and political unrest. Archaeological, historical and palaeoclimatic evidence implies that climatic factors and population growth may also have been a contributing factor. This is the opinion of Adam Schneider, from the University of California-San Diego, and Selim Adali from the Research Centre fort Anatolian Civlisations in Turkey. Their findings have been published in Springer’s journal Climatic Change.

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