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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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June 21 2015

Microdosing: A New, Low-Key Way to Use Psychedelics


"Micro-dosing turns out to be a totally different world," he explained. "As someone said, the rocks don’t glow, even a little bit. But what many people are reporting is, at the end of the day, they say, ‘That was a really good day.’ You know, that kind of day when things kind of work. You’re doing a task you normally couldn’t stand for two hours, but you do it for three or four. You eat properly. Maybe you do one more set of reps. Just a good day. That seems to be what we’re discovering."

Study participants functioned normally in their work and relationships, Fadiman said, but with increased focus, emotional clarity, and creativity.

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June 20 2015

Area 51 and extra-terrestrial life both exist, says head of Nasa


The existence of Area 51, has been a badly kept secret for decades and it has fuelled the imaginations of conspiracy theorists and UFO hunters around the world

In 2013 the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) acknowledged its exact location in Nevada, near Groom Lake, in a series of documents released as part of a Freedom of Information request.

"There is an Area 51,” he said. “It’s not what many people think. I’ve been to a place called that but it’s a normal research and development place. I never saw any aliens or alien spacecraft or anything when I was there."


Alt: Aliens are out there and Area 51 is real, head of Nasa says

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June 20 2015

Abducted by aliens? Neurologist finds similarities in alleged victims


Neurologist Dr. Michael B. Russo says that he initially didn’t know what to make of the first few patients who told him they’d been abducted by aliens from outer space.

As part of his regular testing of patients, Russo used his $200,000 dense-array electroencephalography, or DEEG, machine — the only one of its kind in Hawaii — to map the electrical activity in the brains of his patients.


Alt: Neurologist Studies Brain Waves of Alien Abductees

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June 20 2015

BBC reveals mind control experiment – for choosing what to watch next


Paging the Daily Mail: BBC in mind-control shock! Except this story is unlikely to become a front-page scandal, since it involves viewers’ brainwaves controlling their TVs, rather than the other way around.

The broadcaster has revealed details of its latest tech experiment, which involved working with digital agency This Place to create a “Mind Control TV” prototype for use with its iPlayer catch-up service.

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June 20 2015

Why do people hate the sound of their own voice?


Whether you've heard yourself talking on the radio or just gabbing in a friend's Instagram video, you probably know the sound of your own voice -- and chances are pretty good that you hate it.

Your voice as you hear it when you speak out loud is very different from the voice the rest of the world perceives. That's because it comes to you via a different channel than everyone else.

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June 20 2015

Eye trick reveals musicians even see in tune


Musicians don’t just hear in tune, they also see in tune, according to new research.

Researchers designed a scientific experiment to puzzle out how the brain creates an apparently seamless view of the external world based on the information it receives from the eyes.

“Our brain is remarkably efficient at putting us in touch with objects and events in our visual environment, indeed so good that the process seems automatic and effortless,” says Randolph Blake, professor of psychology at Vanderbilt University, who directed the study.

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June 20 2015

Neuroscientists capture the moment a brain records an idea


Cutting-edge brain imaging technology has offered the first glimpse into how new concepts develop in the human brain.

The research, carried out at Carnegie Mellon University and published in Human Brain Mapping, involved teaching people a new concept and observing how it was coded in the same areas of the brain through neural representations.

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June 20 2015

Switching on happy memories 'perks up' stressed mice


Neuroscientists have discovered that artificially stimulating a positive memory can cause mice to snap out of depression-like behaviour.

Brain cells storing a good memory were labelled and then later re-activated, after the mice were stressed.

"Turning on" the memory for just a few minutes eliminated signs of depression.

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June 20 2015

Sixth mass extinction is here: Humanity's existence threatened


There is no longer any doubt: We are entering a mass extinction that threatens humanity's existence.

That is the bad news at the center of a new study by a group of scientists including Paul Ehrlich, the Bing Professor of Population Studies in biology and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Ehrlich and his co-authors call for fast action to conserve threatened species, populations and habitat, but warn that the window of opportunity is rapidly closing.

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June 20 2015

Wild bees 'just as important as honeybees' for pollinating food crops


Wild bees have become as important as domesticated honeybees in pollinating food crops around the world due to the dramatic decline in number of healthy honeybee colonies over the past half century, a study has found.

The largest international survey of insect pollinators has also found that just 2 per cent of wild bee species now account for 80 per cent of global crop pollination – from apples and pears to cacoa chocolate and coffee.


Alt: Bees contribute more to British economy than Royal Family

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June 20 2015

Social brains: Do insect societies share brain power?


The society you live in can shape the complexity of your brain—and it does so differently for social insects than for humans and other vertebrate animals.

A new comparative study of social and solitary wasp species suggests that as social behavior evolved, the brain regions for central cognitive processing in social insect species shrank. This is the opposite of the pattern of brain increases with sociality that has been documented for several kinds of vertebrate animals including mammals, birds and fish.

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June 20 2015

Hawkmoths Slow Brain to Dine in the Night


Getting food can be tough for all sorts of animals, but the hawkmoth has a particular challenge. It feeds at dusk by inserting a long proboscis into a flower to drink nectar. One of the ways the moths seem to cope with near darkness is to slow visual processing in their brains, as if they were using a slower shutter speed in a camera, they are able to allow their brains to gather more light.


Related: Why whistling caterpillars scare birds
Related: Do butterflies hold the answer to life's mysteries?

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June 20 2015

Silver coat lets Saharan ants withstand scorching desert heat


Call it the ultimate sunshade. During the hottest part of the day, tiny hairs on the back of the Saharan silver ant repel the sun's rays and also shed excess heat back toward the sky.

It was their metallic look that intrigued Nanfang Yu from Columbia University in New York. On desert sands they remind him of "a droplet of mercury", he says.

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June 20 2015

Male Bird Sings 'Dad Song' to Advertise His Fathering Skills


The male nightingale’s elaborate song advertises to potential mates how good a father he will be, new research finds.

The quality of the “dad song,” which has inspired well-known composers such as Mozart, turns out to be directly linked to how devoted the bird singer will later be to his chicks, and how often he will feed them.

The study, published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, further reports that multiple song features — complex whistling, trilling, buzzing and more — all seem to be important in communicating dad skills.

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June 20 2015

Some birds ‘sign’ eggs to weed out impostors


In the scrublands of southern Zambia, birds are practicing what’s known as “brood parasitism”—laying eggs in the nests of another bird species. And the victims are fighting back with colors and patterns.

African songbirds that are frequently victimized by brood parasitic cuckoos have taken to creating elaborate patterns on their eggs to help them recognize the forgeries, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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June 20 2015

Who's your daddy? If you're a gorilla, it doesn't matter


Being the daddy isn't important for male gorillas when it comes to their relationships with the kids; it's their rank in the group that makes the difference, says new research published in Animal Behaviour. The authors of the study, from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), say this supports the theory that for most of their evolution, gorillas lived in groups with one male and several females.


Related: Daddy's Here! Why Fathers Call Themselves 'Dad' Around Children

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June 20 2015

Most kangaroos are lefties, study finds


The question of whether you are a righty or a lefty no longer applies just to humans and great apes. It turns out that kangaroos prefer one hand over the other as well.

Most kangaroos prefer to use their left hand to pick up leaves, move food into their mouths, and groom their bodies, according to a study published Thursday in Current Biology.

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