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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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November 13 2014

1,000-Year-Old Tomb Reveals Murals, Stars & Poetry


A 1,000-year-old tomb with a ceiling decorated with stars and constellations has been discovered in northern China.

Found not far from a modern day railway station, the circular tomb has no human remains but instead has murals which show vivid scenes of life. "The tomb murals mainly depict the daily domestic life of the tomb occupant," and his travels with horses and camels, a team of researchers wrote in their report on the tomb recently published in the journal Chinese Cultural Relics.

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November 13 2014

Cappadocia’s 11,000-year-old settlement thrills experts


After 25 years of excavations, Asikli Höyük continues to thrill archaeologists, who believe the number of things left to discover at the site would allow for at least another 25 years of work or more

Professor Mihriban Ozbasaran from Istanbul University, the current head of the excavation and research project at Asikli Hoyuk, was a doctorate student when excavations at the site in the Cappadocia region of Central Anatolia began in 1989.

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November 12 2014

Jesus: married with children? New book drops bombshell


A new book claims Jesus married Mary Magdalene and had two sons with her, based on 1,500-year-old manuscript found in the British Library.

"The Lost Gospel," by Israeli-Canadian writer Simcha Jacobovici and York University Professor Barrie Wilson, bases its claim on the document dating back to 570 AD and written in Aramaic.


Alt: Jesus Christ, Wife Mary Magdalene Had 2 Kids, New Book Claims

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November 12 2014

Germans convicted of stealing from Egypt's Great Pyramid


An Egyptian court sentenced three Germans and six Egyptians to five years jail on Tuesday for stealing fragments of a pharaonic artifact from Cairo's Great Pyramid, a judicial source said.

A court in Giza, south of the capital, sentenced in absentia three Germans -- who had claimed they were researchers -- for stealing pieces of an ancient scroll bearing the name of the Pharaoh Khufu, as well as rock samples, the source said.

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November 12 2014

British Museum releases scans of artefacts to let you 3D print your own museum at home


The British Museum could soon be coming to your living room – if, that is, you have a 3D printer on hand.

Working in collaboration with Sketchfab, an online platform that lets users share and download 3D scans, the British Museum has created 14 3D models of busts, statues and sarcophagi from its collection for anyone to download and print at home.

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November 12 2014

Black Hole Fails to Destroy Mystery Cosmic Cloud


A cosmic gas cloud seemingly destined for a deadly encounter with the gigantic black hole at the core of the Milky Way has surprisingly survived a close pass by the monster's maw.

The reason, a team of astronomers now argues, is that it wasn't a gas cloud after all. Instead, they claim the mystery cloud dubbed "G2" was the puffy outer atmosphere of a star, one with gravity strong enough to withstand the tug of a nearby jumbo black hole.

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November 12 2014

How a giant impact formed asteroid Vesta's 'belt'


Collisions of heavenly bodies generate almost unimaginable levels of energy. Researchers used NASA's ultra-high-speed cannon and computer models to simulate such a collision on Vesta, the second-largest object in the asteroid belt. Their analysis of the images -- taken at a million frames per second -- shows how Vesta may have gotten the deep grooves that encircle its midsection.


Related: Tomorrow, a Spacecraft Will Try to Land on a Comet for the First Time Ever

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November 12 2014

Megasunspot's Solar Outbursts Surprise Scientists


A humongous sunspot — the biggest one seen since 1990 — produced no aurora-causing events despite firing off 10 intense solar flares in less than two weeks last month, scientists say.

"Supersunspot" AR 2192 was so big that it was visible on the sun to people without a telescope (and some viewers did indeed see it through eclipse glasses during the partial solar eclipse of Oct. 23). At a staggering 1.65 billion square miles (4.27 billion square kilometers) in size, it was the33rd largest "active region" ever observed on the sun by astronomers since 1874.

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November 12 2014

As Earth left the last ice age, CO2 rose in fits and starts


Selecting what kind of record to use when studying Earth’s climate history is a bit like selecting a camera lens from your bag. The choice depends on what you want to see, and your options are limited to what's in the bag. Some climate records are long but low-resolution—a wide-angle lens that shows you the big picture. Other records are short but high-resolution—a telephoto lens that lets you get a good look at that duck over there.

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November 12 2014

Verdict Overturned for Italian Geoscientists Convicted of Manslaughter


An appeals court in Italy has overturned the 2012 manslaughter conviction handed down to seven prominent scientists and engineers following a devastating earthquake in 2009. The decision came as a surprise—and a relief—to many of the accused’s colleagues, who worried that pressure from the community, victims’ families, and local press would compel the court to agree with the earlier decision.

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November 12 2014

This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood


The digital health revolution is still stuck.

Tech giants are jumping into the fray with fitness offerings like Apple Health and Google Fit, but there’s still not much in the way of, well, actual medicine. The Fitbits and Jawbones of the world measure users’ steps and heart rate, but they don’t get into the deep diagnostics of, say, biomarkers, the internal indicators that can serve as an early warning sign of a serious ailment. For now, those who want to screen for a disease or measure a medical condition with clinical accuracy still need to go to the doctor.

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November 12 2014

Fearing Bombs That Can Pick Whom to Kill


On a bright fall day last year off the coast of Southern California, an Air Force B-1 bomber launched an experimental missile that may herald the future of warfare.

Initially, pilots aboard the plane directed the missile, but halfway to its destination, it severed communication with its operators. Alone, without human oversight, the missile decided which of three ships to attack, dropping to just above the sea surface and striking a 260-foot unmanned freighter.

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November 12 2014

Dolphin-like robots help scientists explore melting polar ice


Ice sheets on the coast of West Antarctica are rapidly melting and it's predicted that if they continue to collapse, sea levels will rise by at least 3 metres. Scientists have been keeping a close eye on the warm water near the coast, which they think is the main factor causing the ice to melt. But exactly how this is happening has remained a mystery, and now scientists from the California Institute of Technology in the US have obtained some important information on the melting Antarctic ice, with the help of three dolphin-like robots.

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November 12 2014

New Amazon Carbon Maps May Help Limit Deforestation


The vast jungle canopy of the Amazon looks like a solid wall of green from space to the human eye. But satellites and other high tech instruments can provide a much more nuanced view right down to the household level.

That might sound like something the CIA would be interested in, but there’s another audience that could benefit even more: forest managers and scientists looking to sequester the most carbon possible. Now a new study has provided them with that view by creating the most detailed carbon maps ever produced for the Amazon.

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November 12 2014

Anti-organic: Why do some farmers resist profitable change?


Why do some chemical farmers resist a profitable conversion to organic methods? A new study in the Journal of Marketing suggests it may be because making that change feels like switching belief systems.

"The ideological map of American agriculture reveals an unfolding drama between chemical and organic farming... Chemical farmers argue that to make money, one must follow chemical traditions; when organic farmers make more money, it seems "wrong."

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November 12 2014

Landmark 20-Year Study Finds Pesticides Linked to Depression In Farmers


A landmark study indicates that seven pesticides, some widely used, may be causing clinical depression in farmers. Will the government step in and start regulating these chemical tools?

Earlier this fall, researchers from the National Institute of Health finished up a landmark 20-year study, a study that hasn’t received the amount of coverage it deserves. About 84,000 farmers and spouses of farmers were interviewed since the mid-1990s to investigate the connection between pesticides and depression, a connection that had been suggested through anecdotal evidence for far longer.

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November 12 2014

Cancer's 'Frankenstein' DNA mystery solved


The creation of a 'Frankenstein' chromosome that steals the DNA it needs to grow and survive has been detailed for the first time in research led by Australian scientists.

The work, published today in the journal Cancer Cell , shows how an extra chromosome, known as a neochromosome, found in up to three per cent of all cancers, is created.

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