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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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October 12 2014

Google sending its Street View cameras to the desert... on camels


A friend of mine suffers from travel anxiety.

Her thoughts about how she’ll proceed from A to B are fraught with all manner of What Ifs, mainly prompted by not knowing what various stages of the journey will look like. Google Maps has proved to be a boon for her in this regard; its Street View facility, once restricted to urban thoroughfares, has since expanded to cover all kinds of places including, crucially, the interiors of major transit hubs such as airports and rail termini. Using Google Maps, my friend can visually preview the entirety of some of her trips, eliminating surprise and reducing her heart rate in one fell swoop. And if she happens to be planning a trip to the Liwa Desert on the Arabian peninsula any time soon, Google’s got that covered, too, thanks to a camel called Raffia.

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October 11 2014

Z machine makes progress toward nuclear fusion


Scientists are reporting a significant advance in the quest to develop an alternative approach to nuclear fusion. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, using the lab’s Z machine, a colossal electric pulse generator capable of producing currents of tens of millions of amperes, say they have detected significant numbers of neutrons—byproducts of fusion reactions—coming from the experiment.

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October 11 2014

Thermoelectrics for waste-heat recovery: Introducing E1


Alphabet Energy has an inexpensive thermoelectric generator, the E1, for waste heat recovery. The generator captures exhaust heat and converts it into electricity. The E1 uses Alphabet's thermoelectric materials to convert the waste heat.

Matthew Scullin, CEO, in introducing the E1 Thermal Electric Generator in a promotional video, said, "With the E1, waste heat is now valuable." He said the waste heat recovery product meets the oil and gas and mining industry criteria for a strong but simple solution.

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October 11 2014

Burnt Magna Carta Read for First Time in 283 Years


More than 280 years after it was damaged in a fire, one of the original copies of the Magna Carta is legible again.

Written in 1215, the Magna Carta required the king of England — King John — to cede absolute power. Today, the Magna Carta is seen as a first step toward constitutional law rather than the hereditary power of royalty. There were four copies of the document created at the time. One, held by the British Library, was badly damaged in a fire in 1731.


Images here

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October 11 2014

Human fossils from 'oldest Parisian'


Scientists have unearthed rare, ancient human remains in silts close to the River Seine in France.

The left arm bones are dated to about 200,000 years ago, and look to be Neanderthal - although the researchers say that with no other fossils it is impossible to make a full description.

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October 11 2014

A Start-up Has Invented Veggie Burgers That ‘Bleed’


A biochemist named Patrick Brown has come up with yet another alternative strategy to produce entirely meatless hamburgers that look and taste very much like meat. That's one above, looking sufficiently burgerlike; it's even got that pristine medium-rare thing going on. Patties now being made by Brown's Impossible Foods are suffused with something called heme, it turns out, a molecule that comes from the roots of nitrogen-fixing plants but has the iron-tinged character of hemoglobin.

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October 11 2014

This Device Could Detect Dozens of Cancers With a Single Blood Test


Early detection, we’re often told, is the surest way to beat cancer. It’s the reason why, year after year, men and women of a certain age dutifully visit their doctors and undergo uncomfortable tests to screen for things like prostate and breast cancer.

But what about the other hundred or so types of cancer out there—the brain cancers, the ovarian cancers, the leukemias and lymphomas?

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October 11 2014

Did Scientists Just Develop A Viable Cure For Type 1 Diabetes?


In what's being called one of the most important advances to date in the field, researchers at Harvard have used stem cells to create insulin-producing beta cells in large quantities. Human transplantation trials could only be a few years away.

By using human embryonic stem cells, a research team led by Doug Melton created human insulin-producing beta cells that are virtually equivalent to normally functional beta cells in the kind of large quantities required for cell transplantation and pharmaceutical purposes.

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October 11 2014

Gut bacteria protein linked to anorexia and bulimia


A protein made by gut bacteria may trigger a chain of interactions in the body that contribute to eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia.

When the protein is produced, the body makes antibodies to bind to it, but the antibodies also attach to a hormone that controls fullness.

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October 11 2014

That Beer Smell? Designed to Attract Flies


We have fruit flies to thank for beer’s familiar smell, according to new research.

The most prominent odors released by beer are produced by common brewer’s yeast, which evolved the aroma to attract fruit flies. The flies, in turn, benefit yeast by dispersing its cells into the environment.

“Two seemingly unrelated species, yeasts and flies, have developed an intricate symbiosis based on smell,” researcher Kevin Verstrepen of KU Leuven and VIB in Belgium said in a press release.

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October 11 2014

Sustainable city concepts going into action


Researchers are starting work on a Smart Cities and Communities initiative. This project will transform designated urban districts into smart quarters in three forerunner cities and then transfer the concepts to three further cities.

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October 11 2014

Fish moving poleward at rate of 26 kilometres per decade


Large numbers of fish will disappear from the tropics by 2050, finds a new study that examined the impact of climate change on fish stocks. The study identified ocean hotspots for local fish extinction but also found that changing temperatures will drive more fish into the Arctic and Antarctic waters.

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October 11 2014

Cosmic Karma: Mosquitoes Have Flying, Blood-Sucking Parasites of Their Own


In 1922, a scientist named F.W. Edwards published a paper describing a remarkable thing: a flying, biting midge collected from the Malay Peninsula in southeast Asia that he named Culicoides anophelis. What made the midge was remarkable was the thing it bit: mosquitoes.

Yet in the years since, relatively little work has been done on these potentially important blood-sucking midges.

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October 11 2014

Venomous Slow Loris May Have Evolved To Mimic Cobras


What’s slow, fuzzy, and deadly like a cobra? The slow loris, of course! Researchers are arguing that these endangered Asian primates evolved to mimic venomous snakes.

An article published in the Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases suggested slow lorises adopted serpentine markings and movements as defense mechanisms.

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October 11 2014

Garlic injection could tackle tree diseases


Injecting trees with a concentrated form of garlic might help save trees in the UK from deadly diseases.

Operating under an experimental government licence, a prototype piece of technology to administer the solution is being trialled on a woodland estate in Northamptonshire.

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October 11 2014

'Vampire grave' found in Bulgaria


A "vampire grave" containing a skeleton with a stake driven through its chest has been unearthed by a man known as "Bulgaria’s Indiana Jones".

Professor Nikolai Ovcharov – a crusading archaeologist who has dedicated his life to unearthing mysteries of ancient civilisations – said that he had made the discovery while excavating the ruins of Perperikon, an ancient Thracian city located in southern Bulgaria.

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October 11 2014

Father of philosophy comes under forensic scrutiny


After digging up the past of Joan of Arc, Richard the Lionheart and Napoleon Bonaparte, a top forensic sleuth on Friday unveiled a medical secret of Rene Descartes, a founder of modern philosophy.

A hi-tech scan of Descartes' skull revealed he had a massive bony growth in his right sinus, lodged near the bridge of his nose, French medical anthropologist Philippe Charlier reported in The Lancet.

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