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February 14 2015

Hadrian's Wall faces threat from 'night hawkers'


Land around Hadrian's Wall, a Roman ruin and one of Britain's top tourist attractions, is being damaged by illegal treasure hunters known as "night hawkers", officials said Thursday.


Alt: Illegal 'nighthawkers' damage Hadrian's Wall

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February 14 2015

Potential 'killer blow' to King Richard III revealed


New film footage revealing for the first time details of the potential killer blow that claimed the life of King Richard III has been released by the University of Leicester.


Alt: Richard III Killed by Sword Thrust Upwards Into Neck

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February 14 2015

Skeletons in 6,000-Year-Old Embrace Found in Cave


A 6,000-year-old romance has been uncovered in a Greek cave as archaeologists unearthed the skeletons of an undisturbed Neolithic couple locked in an embrace.

Found in the Alepotrypa, or foxhole, one of the Diros caves in southern Greece, the prehistoric remains were positioned curled into the fetal position, as if spooning each other. The grave also contained broken arrowheads.

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February 14 2015

Oldest twin remains found in Siberia


The world's oldest set of human twins, buried with their young mother have been found by a team of researchers investigating an early Neolithic cemetery in Siberia.

The skeleton of the woman was exhumed in 1997 from a hunter-gatherer cemetery in south-eastern Siberia. Found with 15 marmot teeth — decorative accessories which were probably attached to clothing — the remains were photographed and labelled, but were not investigated by anthropologists, until recently.

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February 14 2015

Egyptian Alexandria - Ancient underwater finds revealed the Pharaonic roots of the Ptolemaic City


Alexandria, located on the Mediterranean coast in Egypt, has seen many changes in its 2,300 year history. Founded by Alexander the Great in 331 B.C., at its height it rivalled Rome in its wealth and size, and was the seat for the Ptolemaic dynasty. However, through history not all agreed on the how to regard the Hellenistic city with a royal Egyptian past. An underwater temple discovered by marine divers off the eastern coast shed light on the pharaonic nature of ancient Alexandria.

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February 13 2015

Rosetta stone-style stele unearthed in the Mediterranean coast


CAIRO: A 2,200 year-old “an upright stone slab bearing a commemorative inscription” was unearthed at the Mediterranean coast, Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty announced Thursday.

The stele, which was discovered at Taposiris Magna archaeological site on Lake Mariout, southwest of the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, “dates to the reign of Ptolemy V Epiphanes (204B.C-180B.C) of the Ptolemaic Dynasty (332 B.C.-30 B.C) that has ruled Egypt after the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.”.

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February 13 2015

Chess to be taught in Spanish schools


Spain’s government is set to add chess to the school curriculum after politicians of all stripes unanimously agreed on the proposal.

A Spanish parliamentary education committee announced they had agreed to "urge the government to introduce the Chess in Schools programme in the Spanish education system in accordance with the European Parliament’s recommendations.".

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February 13 2015

Study reveals the poetry of rap, through rhyme


Linguists at The University of Manchester have examined the tracks of artists including multiple Grammy award-winner Eminem and Public Enemy, finding that the rhymes that make them superstars are so intuitive they are not within their conscious control.

Louise Middleton, who is a third year linguistics student, examined the rhyming structures in rap music looking at rhyming patterns, vocabulary size, rhyme rate and the position of the rhyme in or across lines.

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February 13 2015

Happy face or angry face? A dog can tell the difference, study finds


Word to the wise: Don’t play poker with your dog. He can read your face like a book. A new study shows that man’s best friend is remarkably good at discerning happy expressions from angry ones – even when he’s only looking at half of a person’s face.

The authors say the findings, published in the journal Current Biology, are the first to provide solid evidence that an animal can read the expressions of a totally different species (that is, those of humans).


Alt: Dogs Know What That Smile on Your Face Means

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February 13 2015

Apes make irrational economic decisions – that includes you


Just the other day I found myself in the waiting room of an automotive dealership. While my car was being serviced, I flipped through a product brochure. One ad for an oil change boasted that it would clean out at least 90% of used oil. Another for new brakes guaranteed maximum performance for twelve months. No one was advertising oil changes that leave behind 10% sludge, or brakes that begin to fail after only a year.

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February 13 2015

Curious monkeys share our thirst for knowledge


Monkeys are notoriously curious, and new research has quantified just how eager they are to gain new information, even if there are not immediate benefits. The findings offer insights into how a certain part of the brain shared by monkeys and humans plays a role in decision making, and perhaps even in some disorders and addictions in humans.

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February 13 2015

Should the animals we eat chow down on larvae?


By 2050, global meat-eating is expected to rise 73 percent over current levels. Appetites for seafood are booming, too. To help meet this demand, new research is looking down the food chain.

A recent report examines the commercial viability of using housefly larva meal as a sustainable, less-expensive protein alternative to feeding livestock and farm-raised fish.

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February 13 2015

Tiny termites can hold back deserts by creating oases of plant life


Termites might not top the list of humanity's favorite insects, but new research suggests that their large dirt mounds are crucial to stopping the spread of deserts into semi-arid ecosystems and agricultural lands. The results not only suggest that termite mounds could make these areas more resilient to climate change than previously thought, but could also inspire a change in how scientists determine the possible effects of climate change on ecosystems.

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February 13 2015

Found: Two sophisticated mammals that thrived during the age of the dinosaurs


Researchers have discovered what may have been the world’s first burrowing and tree-climbing mammals—two shrew-sized critters that lived in what is today China during the age of the dinosaurs. The fossils add to the growing evidence that, far from cowering in the dinosaurs’ shadow, early mammals were highly successful, specialized animals in their own right.

The new finds “give us a very different view of mammal life during the age of dinosaurs”.

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February 13 2015

Oldest fur seal identified, ending 5-million-year 'ghost lineage'


The oldest known fur seal has been discovered by a Geology PhD student at New Zealand's University of Otago, providing a missing link that helps to resolve a more than 5-million-year gap in fur seal and sea lion evolutionary history.

Otago's Robert Boessenecker and colleague Morgan Churchill from the University of Wyoming have named this new genus and species of fur seal Eotaria crypta. The genus name Eotaria means 'dawn sea lion'.

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February 13 2015

Ancient sexual ‘cult sites’ discovered near Eilat


Over 100 neolithic “cult sites” containing sexual carvings, graves and human-like figures, and dating back roughly 8,000 years, have been found in the Eilat Mountains in southern Israel.


Related: 8000-Year-Old Stone Penises and Vulvas Discovered in Israel

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February 13 2015

Ancient tablets displayed in Jerusalem fuel looting debate


At first glance, the ancient Babylonian tablets on exhibit for the first time at a Jerusalem museum look like nothing more than pockmarked lumps of clay.

But the 2,500-year-old treasures from present-day Iraq have become part of a thorny archaeological debate over how to handle historically significant relics thought to have been dug up in the fog of war by Mideast antiquities robbers.

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