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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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June 24 2015

Fetus Found Inside 17th-Century Mummified Monk's Coffin


When investigators performed a CT scan of the coffin belonging to a 74-year-old Scandinavian bishop who died almost 350 years ago, they came upon a surprise: a four- to five-month-old fetus tucked under the bishop’s feet.

The discovery was unexpected for researchers at the University hospital in Lund who hoped to learn more about the health and lives of people from that period by examining the remains of the extremely well preserved Bishop Peder Winstrup.

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June 24 2015

Ancient Greek 'Antikythera' Shipwreck Still Holds Secrets


An ancient shipwreck doesn't give up all its secrets at once. Greek authorities have approved a five-year extension for an international team of explorers to continue probing the remains of a 2,085-year-old shipwreck known for holding what is considered the world's oldest computer.

The ship, which likely sank between 70 B.C. and 60 B.C. as it trekked west from Asia Minor to Rome, holds plenty of treasure: During the first phase of the project "Return to Antikythera," which ended in October 2014, undersea explorers found tableware, a lead anchor, a giant bronze spear that may have been part of a statue of a warrior or the goddess Athena, and other artifacts.

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June 24 2015

Ancient Greeks Were Afraid of Zombies


The ancient Greeks believed in ghostly versions of the dead who would rise from their graves and stalk the living, according to deviant burials unearthed in the necropolis of a Greek colony in Sicily.

Known as Passo Marinaro, the cemetery near the coastal town of Kamarina in southeastern Sicily, was in use from the 5th through 3rd centuries B.C. The necropolis has yielded approximately 2,905 burials; more than half contained grave goods, mostly terracotta vases, but also figurines and metal coins.

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June 23 2015

Neanderthal-Human Hybrid Unearthed


Between 35,000 and 45,000 years ago, modern humans spread throughout Europe. Around the same time, Neanderthals disappeared from the landscape—but not before interbreeding with Homo sapiens. Recent research has revealed that all non-Africans living today retain a genetic trace—1-3 percent of the genome—of Neanderthal ancestry. And 40,000 years ago, human genomes may have contained twice as much Neanderthal DNA, according to a study published today (June 22) in Nature.

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June 23 2015

The Neanderthal That Got Mistaken For A Cossack


Today, we think that the discovery of neanderthal fossils were a revelation. At the time, they were just another thing to argue about. Here’s why one talented scientist confused a neanderthal with a Cossack.

Neanderthal remains came to light in the 1800s. One of the first sets of remains to be unearthed is what’s now known as Neanderthal 1, discovered in 1856 under meters of mud in a cave. If its discoverers expected praise, they were disappointed. Now we know it to be the remains of an early human. Back then, it was considered everything from a forgery to a failure of scientific observation.

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June 23 2015

Human footprints found along B.C. shoreline may be oldest on continent


Evidence of what could be the oldest family camping trip in North America has been discovered below the shoreline of a remote British Columbia island.

Remnants of an ancient campfire were found nearby.


Alt: Could These Be the Oldest Human Footprints in North America?

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June 23 2015

Early Humans Became More Feminine, Which Led to the Birth of Culture


I have always wondered why our species Homo sapiens, that evolved in Africa about 200,000 years ago, seemed to do nothing special for the first 150,000 years. Because it is not until about 50,000 years ago that the first sign of creative thinking emerged with beautiful cave paintings found in Spain, France and Indonesia.

Around the same time a new sub-species referred to as anatomically modern humans or Homo sapiens sapiens appears.

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June 23 2015

Women cry when they're helpless, men cry for joy - study


Women are known for being the weepier sex. But it seems men are more likely to cry tears of joy.

When reacting to upsetting events, women cry up to four times as often as men, according to Professor Ad Vingerhoets, a leading authority on crying.

However men let the tears flow more often when they experience something positive, for example when their sports team wins an important match.

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June 23 2015

A Chimpanzee Has Rattled Off a Drum Solo


Barney was a fairly normal chimpanzee. A 24-year-old, low-ranking member of a group of five adult male chimpanzees raised at the Biomedical Primate Research Centre in the Netherlands, he generally showed stereotypical behaviors: he played, he banged bottles, he climbed trees. Then, one January day, he walked away from his group and sat down outside, placing an upturned bucket between his feet. He then rattled off the only-known spontaneous, unsolicited chimpanzee drum solo. Primatologists at the center were taken completely by surprise. With no camera nearby, they recorded the five-minute performance with a simple voice recorder.

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June 23 2015

Scientists are creating ‘low carbon cows’ to try and reduce greenhouse gases generated by herds


Scientists have created three herds of 'eco cows' as part of an experiment to reduce the amount of greenhouses gases generated by the production of beef.

The researchers have 90 cows at North Wyke farm near Okehampton in Devon for the project, where they will closely examine every aspect of their environment - particularly what they eat - to try and reduce the amount of harmful gases they produce by up to 50 per cent.

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June 23 2015

Tiny Octopus Is So Cute Scientists Might Name It ‘Adorabilis’


Deep in the ocean’s cold, dark waters lives a species of wide-eyed octopus that will surely warm your heart with pure cuteness.

Up until now, these peculiar creatures have gone unnamed. Now, scientists are preparing to formally name the species, and they’re considering the one word that captures this tiny cephalopod’s essence: Opisthoteuthis adorabilis.

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June 23 2015

Wolves are better hunters when monkeys are around


Through a rare mixed-species association observed between a carnivorous predator and a potential prey, Dartmouth-led research has identified that solitary Ethiopian wolves will forage for rodents among grazing gelada monkey herds. Through consistent non-threatening behavior, the Ethiopian wolves have habituated gelada herds to their presence, foregoing opportunities to attack the juvenile geladas in order to better capture the rodents.

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June 23 2015

India has trained dozens of German Shepherds to protect its tigers


India now has a new class of soldiers to tackle animal poachers—wildlife sniffer dogs.

It wasn’t easy though. These dogs had to undergo a number of gruelling sessions to be trained at detecting wildlife products such as tiger skins, ivory tusks and bones of endangered birds. They are also trained to locate animals that have sustained injuries, which helps authorities to get hold of poachers swiftly.

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June 23 2015

Giant Rats Trained to Sniff for Landmines in Cambodia


Cambodia is training an elite squad of rats, imported from Africa, to sniff out landmines and other unexploded ordnance in the once war-wracked kingdom, authorities said on Friday.

A team of 15 rats, some weighing more than 2 1/2 pounds, were imported from Tanzania in April with the help of a Belgian non-governmental organization, which trains rats to sniff out mines, Heng Ratana, director general of Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC), told AFP.

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June 23 2015

Giant 'Walking Bat' Once Prowled Rainforest Floors


About 16 million years ago, a giant bat used all four of its limbs to stalk around the subtropical rainforest of modern-day New Zealand, a new study finds.

The bat, a newly discovered species (Mystacina miocenalis), is large, about three times heavier than a modern bat, the researchers said. It's related to Mystacina tuberculata, a bat that still lives in New Zealand's old-growth forests.

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June 23 2015

'World's oldest mummified dog' goes under the knife


Sensational images have emerged of the remains of a perfectly-preserved mummified puppy, found sealed in the Siberian permafrost after more than 12,400 years.

Taken during a post-mortem examination by scientists, they show incredible detail about the prehistoric beast including its fur, savage teeth and even what it ate during its last moments.

The dog - believed to be a three-month-old female - was unearthed by accident by two brothers searching for woolly mammoth tusks in the Sakha Republic, also known as Yakutia.

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June 23 2015

100-Year-Old Chalkboards, With Drawings Still Intact, Discovered in Oklahoma School


While preparing rooms for renovations, workers at Emerson High School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma uncovered something they didn’t expect. Usually, they find broken pipes and wires but this time they uncovered chalkboards from a century ago, still bearing the lessons and drawings from children and teachers, reports Tim Willert for The Oklahoman.

The Oklahoma City Public School District posted pictures of the preserved chalkboards to their Twitter account. A spokeswoman from the district says that they are looking into ways to preserve the finds, which according to some of the writings, dates back to 1917, reports Elahe Izadi for The Washington Post.

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