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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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July 20 2014

Dogs Were a Prehistoric Woman's Best Friend, Too


Women in a forested area 8,000 years ago were not only in close contact with dogs, but they were also eating the same food the dogs ate and suffering from one or more illnesses the dogs had.

A new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science reveals that dogs weren’t just prehistoric man’s best friend. At least some women during the Early Neolithic period, and likely their children too, also lived very canine-centric lives.

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July 20 2014

Archaeologists Find Evidence of Significant Plant Use Before Agriculture


At a prehistoric site called Al Khiday, set along the White Nile in Central Sudan, archaeologist have uncovered evidence that shows prehistoric inhabitants there consumed significant quantities of a plant that contains both nutritional and medicinal qualities.

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July 20 2014

Could Giant Viruses Be the Origin of Life on Earth?


Chantal Abergel and Jean-Michel Claverie were used to finding strange viruses.

The married virologists at Aix-Marseille University had made a career of it. But pithovirus, which they discovered in 2013 in a sample of Siberian dirt that had been frozen for more than 30,000 years, was more bizarre than the pair had ever imagined a virus could be.

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July 20 2014

Viral relics show cancer's 'footprint' on our evolution


Cancer has left its 'footprint' on our evolution, according to a study which examined how the relics of ancient viruses are preserved in the genomes of 38 mammal species.

Viral relics are evidence of the ancient battles our genes have fought against infection. Occasionally the retroviruses that infect an animal get incorporated into that animal’s genome and sometimes these relics get passed down from generation to generation – termed 'endogenous retroviruses' (ERVs). Because ERVs may be copied to other parts of the genome they contribute to the risk of cancer-causing mutations.

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July 19 2014

5000-year-old Cochno Stone carving may be revealed


A SET of mysterious, 5,000-year-old rock carvings could see the light of day again, after being buried 50 years ago to protect them from vandals.

The Cochno Stone in West Dunbartonshire bears what is considered to be the finest example of Bronze Age “cup and ring” carvings in Europe.


Related: Scotland's Mysterious Petroglyphs Are About to Become Visible Again

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July 19 2014

Who Were the Ancient Bog Mummies? Surprising New Clues


Cast into northern European wetlands, bog bodies have long appeared as opaque to archaeologists as their dark and watery graves. But new clues are coming in the centuries-old mystery of their origins.

Over 500 Iron Age bog bodies and skeletons dating to between 800 B.C. and A.D. 200 have been discovered in Denmark alone, with more unearthed in Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Ireland.

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July 19 2014

520-Million-Year-Old Sea Monster with Preserved Brain Unearthed


A spectacularly well-preserved sea monster that once prowled the oceans during the Cambrian Period has been unearthed in China.

The 520-million-year-old creature, one of the first predators of its day, sported compound eyes, body armor and two spiky claws for grabbing prey.

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July 19 2014

Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna


It remained a mystery for decades.

Since archaeologist F.Ll. Griffith's excavations in the 1920's at the ancient site of the pharaoh Akhenaten's short-lived new capital city of Akhetaten (modern Amarna), archaeologists have been puzzled about the whereabouts of the remains of the city's commoner population – the people who toiled to build and maintain Akhenaten’s sacred edifices and infrastructure -- and more specifically, the estimated 6,000 people who died during the short 15-year period of the city’s construction and development.

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July 19 2014

Holy Grail Stolen – Or Was It?


The quest for the Holy Grail is on again in village of Weston-under-Penyard, Herefordshire, England after a wooden chalice believed by some to be the Grail was stolen from a woman’s house while she was in the hospital.

The wooden chalice is the Nanteos Cup, which many believe Joseph of Arimathea used to catch the blood and sweat of Jesus at the crucifixion. He was said to have brought it to Britain where it eventually taken to Nanteos Mansion near Aberystwyth, Wales, by seven monks during the reign of Henry VIII.

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July 19 2014

Roman road discovered on an archaeological dig shows pot hole repairs


The excavation at Ipplepen, run by the University of Exeter, is back on site following the discovery of a complex series of archaeological features thought to be part of the largest Romano-British settlement in Devon outside of Exeter.

Wheel ruts found in the newly excavated road surface are thought to be like those at Pompeii caused by carts being driven over them. This is cause for excitement according to archaeologist Danielle Wootton, the Devon Finds Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

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July 19 2014

Waste paper turned into a super-spongy battery


GOT an overflowing wastepaper basket? Now there's a way to use unwanted printouts to store energy.

Traditional batteries use chemical reactions to store large amounts of energy, but they take time to charge. Capacitors store it in an electric field, which means they can charge and release energy quickly. But they can only hold small amounts at a time.

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July 19 2014

Future electronics may depend on lasers, not quartz


Nearly all electronics require devices called oscillators that create precise frequencies—frequencies used to keep time in wristwatches or to transmit reliable signals to radios. For nearly 100 years, these oscillators have relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, much like a tuning fork is used as a reference to tune a piano. However, future high-end navigation systems, radar systems, and even possibly tomorrow's consumer electronics will require references beyond the performance of quartz.

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July 19 2014

Scientists hit a diamond with biggest laser in the world: Here's why


Scientists are trying to determine what happens to matter when it is exposed to the immense pressures at the center of gas giant planets and stars. And to help them figure it out, they have hit a tiny sliver of a diamond with the largest laser system on Earth.

"The goal of the shots is to try and create planetary core conditions on Earth," said Ray Smith, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. "And by that I mean very high pressure and relatively low temperature.".

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July 19 2014

Spaceport UK: Government plan to launch spaceplanes


Build it and they will come. That was the message from the UK Space Agency today as it revealed ambitious plans to build a spaceport somewhere in the UK before 2018. However, no commercial space company has yet demonstrated a spaceplane that is capable of carrying paying passengers.

The plan is to build a spaceport at a remote site where regular airline traffic is low.

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July 19 2014

Voyager may not have entered interstellar space, after all


Nearly a year after NASA trumpeted Voyager 1’s departure from the sun’s protective bubble, two mission scientists argue that the spacecraft never left. Many astronomers are doubtful about the assertion, but the debate illustrates that the transition from solar bubble to interstellar space is not clear-cut.

“My tendency is to think we are out in interstellar space, but I’m not completely convinced,” says Eric Christian, an astrophysicist at NASA.

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July 19 2014

Panning for dark matter in an Australian gold mine


"LV IN the hole!" Luke Norsworthy barks into the radio as our light vehicle bounces into a shaft in the Australian outback.

Norsworthy is the electrical supervisor at Stawell mine, 3 hours' drive from Melbourne. The mine yields some 85 kilograms of pure gold every month. But it may also soon host one of the most important experiments in particle physics – one capable of confirming our best direct observations of dark matter.

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July 19 2014

Is the universe a bubble? Let's check: Making the multiverse hypothesis testable


Scientists are working to bring the multiverse hypothesis, which to some sounds like a fanciful tale, firmly into the realm of testable science. Never mind the Big Bang; in the beginning was the vacuum. The vacuum simmered with energy (variously called dark energy, vacuum energy, the inflation field, or the Higgs field). Like water in a pot, this high energy began to evaporate -- bubbles formed.

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News desk archive...

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