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January 17 2015

Ancient Piece of Leather Found in Burnt City


A Bronze Age piece of leather adorned with drawings has been discovered. The artefact was found during recent excavations at the 5200-year-old Burnt City, known as Shahr-e Sukhteh in Persian, in south-eastern Iran.

It is incredibly uncommon to find organic material from over 5,000 years ago; environmental factors decay delicate items, causing them to rapidly deteriorate over time. As such, the leather found in the Burnt City is an incredibly rare discovery.

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January 17 2015

Woolly mammoth cloning attempt revives ethical debate


Herds of woolly mammoths could be lumbering across the Canadian tundra in the near future if a Korean company's project works out.

Earlier this year, Seoul-based Sooam Biotech took flesh and blood samples from a very well-preserved mammoth. The mammoth, nicknamed "Buttercup," was discovered on an island in Siberia in 2013. Sooam hopes to clone her, bringing back a species that has been extinct for several thousand years – a process that scientists call de-extinction.

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January 16 2015

Scientists Extract DNA from 45,000-Year-Old Kangaroo, Wallaby


Australian researchers have managed to extract DNA from two extinct marsupials: a giant short-faced kangaroo (Simosthenurus occidentalis) and a giant wallaby (Protemnodon anak).

“The ancient DNA reveals that extinct giant wallabies are very close relatives of large living kangaroos, such as the red and western grey kangaroos,” said Dr Bastien Llamas of the University of Adelaide’s Australian Cente for Ancient DNA, who is the first author of a paper published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.

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January 16 2015

Ancient Egyptian fortress unearthed in Sinai


The 3,000 year-old ruins and foundations of the largest known fortress in Egypt were unearthed at the ancient fortified city of Tell Habua near the Suez Canal, said Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al- Damaty Saturday.

“The discovery is significant as it reflects the details of the ancient Egyptian military history. It is a model example of Ancient Egypt’s military architecture, as well as the Egyptian war strategies through different ages."

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January 16 2015

Anthropocene: Earth is already in a new epoch, has been since July 16, 1945, scientists claim


Geologists, climate scientists and ecologists have been busy trying to decide whether we are moving from the Holocene to a new epoch recently, but one team of scientists believes it finished long ago.

Proponents of the term 'Anthropocene' believe that humans have had such a profound effect on the Earth's crust that a new epoch is fitting, and some believe the detonation of the first atomic bomb during a test seems as good a mark of it as any.

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January 16 2015

Humanity has exceeded 4 of 9 'planetary boundaries'


Civilization has crossed four of nine so-called planetary boundaries as the result of human activity, according to a report published today in Science by the 18-member research team. Among them is Steve Carpenter, director of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology and the only U.S.-based researcher on the study.

For the last 11,700 years until roughly 100 years ago, Earth had been in a "remarkably stable state," says Carpenter.

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January 16 2015

Pitcher plant's tricky trap pulls in the ants


Why have a snack when you could have a feast? The pitcher plant has developed a clever way to help it dine on batches of ants at a time rather than individual ants.

The carnivorous plant adjusts the slipperiness of its pitfall traps according to changes in the weather to entice more visitors to their stickly downfall, a new study has found.

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January 16 2015

Sea Turtles Use Earth's Magnetic Field to Find Home


Female sea turtles, known to swim thousands of miles before returning to their birthplace to lay eggs, find their way home by relying on unique magnetic signatures along the coast, a new study finds.

For more than 50 years, scientists have been mystified by how sea turtles do this, said the study's lead researcher, J. Roger Brothers, a graduate student of biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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January 16 2015

Neurotic people make better pet ‘parents’


Helicopter parenting probably isn’t great for human children, but some of that clinginess and overprotection may actually be good for rearing dogs and cats.

An online survey of more than 1,000 pet owners nationwide analyzed the key personality traits and nurturing styles of people who identified as a “cat person,” a “dog person,” “both,” or “neither.”


Alt: Pet owners are more neurotic and needy, claims study

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January 16 2015

Smart shoe devices generate power from walking


German researchers have built shoe-sized devices that harvest power from the act of walking.

The technology could be used to power wearable electronic sensors without the need for batteries.

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January 16 2015

People can be convinced they committed a crime that never happened


Innocent adult participants can be convinced, over the course of a few hours, that they had perpetrated crimes as serious as assault with a weapon in their teenage years. This research indicates that the participants came to internalize the stories they were told, providing rich and detailed descriptions of events that never actually took place. fictitious.

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January 16 2015

Mass surveillance not effective for finding terrorists


In response to the terrorist attacks in Paris, the UK government is redoubling its efforts to engage in mass surveillance.

Prime minister David Cameron wants to reintroduce the so-called snoopers' charter – properly, the Communications Data Bill – which would compel telecoms companies to keep records of all internet, email and cellphone activity. He also wants to ban encrypted communications services.

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January 16 2015

Stressed Out? Social Media May Help Women Cope


Face it, ladies: your DIY projects rarely turn out like the ones you see on Pinterest, and your Facebook posts aren't universally "liked." But a new survey suggests that despite such woes, social networking is still good for you.

The survey found that women who frequently use social media, along with other technologies, to connect with friends and family report feeling less stressed than women who connect less often.

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January 16 2015

New Glasses Transform The Way Colorblind People See The World


This special eyewear is giving many a new outlook.

EnChroma, a company in Berkeley, California, has created colorblindness correcting glasses, which allow those who are colorblind to see hues they may have never experienced before.

It's an improvement that could help a significant number of people.

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January 16 2015

Covering eyes can help witnesses recall crimes, study finds


Depicting justice blindfold may not merely be a figurative assertion of courtroom impartiality: witnesses have been shown to improve their memory of a crime when they close their eyes.

Research by psychologists at Surrey University has found fresh evidence suggesting that encouraging people to block off their vision boosts their ability to remember events accurately.


Alt: Close your eyes if you want to find your car keys

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January 16 2015

‘Text neck’ is becoming an ‘epidemic’ and could wreck your spine


The human head weighs about a dozen pounds. But as the neck bends forward and down, the weight on the cervical spine begins to increase. At a 15-degree angle, this weight is about 27 pounds, at 30 degrees it’s 40 pounds, at 45 degrees it’s 49 pounds, and at 60 degrees it’s 60 pounds.

That’s the burden that comes with staring at a smartphone — the way millions do for hours every day, according to research published by Kenneth Hansraj in the National Library of Medicine.

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January 16 2015

92 Percent of College Students Prefer Reading Print Books to E-Readers


Readers have been dreading the rise of e-books since before the technology even existed. A 1991 New York Times piece predicting the imminent invention of the personal e-reader spurred angry and impassioned letters to the editor. One reader wrote in to express his worry that the new electronic books wouldn't work in the bath.

Twenty-three years later, half of American adults own an e-reading device.

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