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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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May 18 2015

Kids know to use ‘indoor voice’ at age 2


Toddlers as young as two understand that the noises they make can affect people around them—and know how to adapt the loudness of the sounds they make depending on what they’re doing and where they are.

“This research tells us more about what young children are capable of understanding,” says lead author Rebecca Williamson, assistant psychology professor at Georgia State University. “It means that it’s developmentally appropriate to talk to two-year-olds about hearing and ask them to be quiet—it’s not out of their grasp to understand this.”.

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May 18 2015

On a noisy airplane, some foods taste different


In noisy situations—like the 85 decibels passengers are exposed to while on an airplane—foods rich in umami flavor get a major boost, but sweet tastes are suppressed.

Umami describes the savory taste of amino acids such as glutamate in foods like tomato juice.

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May 17 2015

Mozart-loving chickens may answer quest for healthier nugget


In barns filled with classical music and lighting that changes to match the hues outside, rows of chickens are fed a diet rich in probiotics, a regimen designed to remove the need for the drugs and chemicals that have tainted the global food chain.

As food giants face growing pressure to offer healthier produce, Southeast Asian poultry firm Kee Song Group says its use of "good" bacteria in feed and water means it can meet one the industry's biggest challenges: how to mass produce drug and hormone-free poultry at a reasonable price.

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May 17 2015

Researchers find equines express emotion through their whinnies


Horses express their emotions through whinnies - and are surprising adept at it, researchers have found.

Swiss researchers found horse whinnies are made of two different fundamental frequencies.

This allows horses to express both positive and negative emotions, and at the same time convey the strength of these emotions.

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May 17 2015

Bad memories drive lab rats to rescue drenched companions faster


Looking like a drowned rat? Never fear, a dry rat may come to your rescue.

An experiment testing whether empathy can drive behaviour in rats has found that, when a dry rat observes a distressed rat trapped in a wet chamber, it will free it from its cage.

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May 17 2015

New Japan volcano island 'natural lab' for life


A brand new island emerging off the coast of Japan offers scientists a rare opportunity to study how life begins to colonise barren land—helped by rotting bird poo and hatchling vomit.

Researchers say bird waste will be the secret ingredient to kickstart Mother Nature's grand experiment on what is a still active volcano that only poked its head above the waves in November 2013.

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May 17 2015

Ecuador Breaks Guinness Reforestation Record


Ecuador broke a world record for reforestation Saturday, as thousands of people pitched in to plant 647,250 trees of more than 200 species, President Rafael Correa said.

"I have just been informed that we have broken the Guinness record for reforestation," the president said in his weekly address.

Correa said the seedlings were planted all over Ecuador, which boasts varied geography from its Pacific coast, high Andean peaks and low Amazon basin areas.

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May 17 2015

Mother Plants Tell Their Seeds When to Sprout


Mother knows best—even if Mom is a plant. A common flowering plant, Arabidopsis, hands down “memories” of recent temperatures to its seeds to prepare them for incoming spring weather conditions, a new study shows.

In an experiment by crop geneticists in Norwich, England, Arabidopsis individuals exposed to warmer temperatures produced seeds that sprouted more quickly than plants exposed to cooler temperatures—even if the warmer temperatures had occurred several weeks before the parents made the seeds.

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May 17 2015

Yoga and chronic pain have opposite effects on brain gray matter


Chronic pain is known to cause brain anatomy changes and impairments, but yoga can be an important tool for preventing or even reversing the effects of chronic pain on the brain, according to a National Institutes of Health (NIH) official speaking at the American Pain Society's annual meeting.

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May 17 2015

How Aboriginal plant extracts might treat diabetes


A new study has found that traditional Aboriginal and Indian plant extracts could be used to manage type 2 diabetes by reducing instances of weight gain, hypertension and immune suppression.

Diabetes is one of the fastest growing metabolic diseases in the world, so coming up with better treatment options has never been more important. Especially since current drugs are known to cause weight gain, making them far from optimal for patients to use long-term.

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May 17 2015

Microbial DNA in Human Body Can Be Used to Identify Individuals


Call it a ‘gut print’. The collective DNA of the microbes that colonize a human body can uniquely identify someone, researchers have found, raising privacy issues.

The finding, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on May 11, suggests that it might be possible to identify a participant in an anonymous study of the body’s microbial denizens—its microbiome—and to reveal details about that person’s health, diet or ethnicity.

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May 17 2015

No more potholes: Living concrete heals itself using bacteria when it comes into contact with water


Building repairs and potholes cost billions every year - and that's not to mention the amount of roadworks created by ongoing maintenance.

But the days of crumbling structures and potholed roads are numbered after a microbiologist developed a self-healing concrete that mends cracks using bacteria.

And this bacteria can also be added to a liquid and sprayed onto existing cracks formed by decades of wear and tear, as well as onto other materials.

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May 17 2015

Trapping humidity out of fog in Chile


The dry, red earth could almost be mistaken for a Martian landscape. It is in fact the Atacama desert in Chile, one of the driest places on Earth.

Average rainfall here is les than 0.1mm (0.004 in) per year and there are many regions which have not seen any precipitation for decades.

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May 17 2015

These bladeless wind turbines shake to generate electricity


Farms dotted with the gigantic spinning blades of wind turbines have become a standard sight on long-distance road trips, but what if there was another way to capture energy from the wind? A startup out of Spain is working on that very idea. The company's called Vortex Bladeless, and its turbines look like stalks of asparagus poking out of the ground.

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May 17 2015

Startup Beams the Web’s Most Important Content from Space, Free


The world’s poor could benefit from a system that is blanketing half Earth’s surface with a signal that provides free access to Wikipedia and other useful websites.


Related: Britain may be forced to ration the internet, expert warns, as web use could consume 100% of nation's power supply by 2035

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May 17 2015

Galaxies die by slow 'strangulation'


When galaxies stop making stars, their death is usually a slow process that chokes them of the necessary cool gases over about four billion years.

That is the conclusion of astronomers who surveyed thousands of galaxies, living and dead, to assess whether the transition is rapid or slow.

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May 17 2015

Does the Red Planet Have Green Auroras?


Martian auroras will never best the visual splendor of those we see on Earth, but have no doubt. The Red Planet still has what it takes to throw an auroral bash. Witness the latest news from NASA’s MAVEN atmospheric probe.

In December 2014, it detected widespread auroras across Mars’ northern hemisphere dubbed the “Christmas Lights”. If a similar display happened on Earth, northern lights would have been visible from as far south as Florida.

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