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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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February 18 2015

Has America entered the age of 'megadroughts'?


Based on tree-ring records, scientists know that severe droughts coincided with the collapse of the Ancestral Pueblo culture. Great droughts struck in the 1100s and 1200s, at the same time as the abandonment of the stone villages at Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon and elsewhere on the Colorado Plateau.

Now, researchers have used the same tree-ring records to divine the future of drought in the United States.


Related: Taps Start to Run Dry in Brazil’s Largest City

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February 18 2015

Scientists reveal revolutionary palm oil alternative: yeast


A little-known yeast historically used in South Africa’s wine industry could revolutionise the food and cosmetics industries, and help halt deforestation

The ubiquity of palm oil, which appears in everything from margarine to lipstick, is now widely recognised. So too are the detrimental effects of palm oil plantations on the world’s remaining rainforests. So why do we keep using it?

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February 18 2015

Spy agencies fund climate research in hunt for weather weapon, scientist fears


A senior US scientist has expressed concern that the intelligence services are funding climate change research to learn if new technologies could be used as potential weapons.

Alan Robock, a climate scientist at Rutgers University in New Jersey, has called on secretive government agencies to be open about their interest in radical work that explores how to alter the world’s climate.

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February 18 2015

Our Sun May Experience a Surprisingly Explosive Death


Our sun will not explode as a powerful supernova when it eventually runs out of fuel, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be fireworks.

When our sun runs out of hydrogen fuel in its core, the star will puff up into a huge red giant and torment itself with powerful stellar winds, eventually stripping its self bare, creating a vast planetary nebula with a small yet dense white dwarf in its core.

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February 18 2015

Weird Sub-Neptunes and Super-Earths Pop Up in Kepler's Planet Search


One of the most common kinds of planets detected by NASA's Kepler telescope appears to be a type that doesn't exist in our own solar system, a leading astronomer on the Kepler team said Friday.

This type of planet has a size in the range between two and four times Earth's diameter, but it shouldn't be called a "super-Earth" or a "mini-Neptune," said Berkeley astronomer Geoff Marcy, one of the world's most experienced planet-hunters. For now, he's calling them "sub-Neptunes.".

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February 18 2015

Planets Orbiting Red Dwarfs May Stay Wet Enough for Life


Small, cold stars known as red dwarfs are the most common type of star in the Universe, and the sheer number of planets that may exist around them potentially make them valuable places to hunt for signs of extraterrestrial life.

However, previous research into planets around red dwarfs suggested that while they may be warm enough to host life, they might also completely dry out, with any water they possess locked away permanently as ice. New research published on the topic finds that these planets may stay wet enough for life after all.

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February 18 2015

Mars One narrows applicant pool to 100 potential dead Martians


On Tuesday, the Mars One foundation took one small step closer to its mission of sending humans to Mars by announcing the "Mars 100," a group of 100 men and women who've moved on from the initial applicant pool of thousands. The private nonprofit reached that number, divided evenly between men and women, after narrowing down from last year's list of 705 hopefuls—all of whom paid an entry fee of roughly $38 to sign up for what's been clearly advertised as a one-way trip to their deaths.


Alt: Mars One: 'We're all going to die, but it's important what you do before you die'

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February 17 2015

Mystery Mars haze baffles scientists


A mysterious haze high above Mars has left scientists scratching their heads.

The vast plume was initially spotted by amateur astronomers in 2012, and appeared twice before vanishing.

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February 17 2015

Scientists think there could be life on Jupiter's moon Europa. Here's why.


Our best shot at finding extraterrestrial life inside the solar system isn't on Mars. It's on Europa: a moon of Jupiter that likely has a vast water ocean under its ultra-cold, icy surface. And if all goes as planned, NASA will begin planning an uncrewed exploration mission to Europa next year.

"We think Europa has the ingredients for life," says Robert Pappalardo, the mission's project scientist. "Not just liquid water, but probably the right elements and chemical energy that might permit life too.".

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February 17 2015

Adding peptide to brain could shrink meals


Scientists have discovered that administering a peptide and hormone to a specific area of the brain may reduce the desire for food.

The study, which appears in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, could one day lead to medications that treat obesity and binge eating disorders.

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February 17 2015

Poor taste penguins lack umami gene


Penguins can't appreciate the delicate flavours of the seafood they catch thanks to a lack of taste.

New research published today in Current Biology reveals that penguins don't have the genes that encode three of the five basic tastes - sweet, bitter, and umami (a savoury flavour), although they are genetically capable of detecting salty and sour tastes.

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February 17 2015

One-star restaurant reviews show signs of trauma, linguists say


A bad meal out might ruin your night, but the ordeal could leave you traumatised too, according to linguists who analysed hundreds of thousands of online reviews.

Diners who left one-star reviews on the website Yelp adopted the same phrases as trauma victims, using the past tense to distance themselves from the event, and terms such as “we” and “us” to share the pain, researchers said.


Related: Expensive restaurants use embellished language in menus to charge more per meal

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February 17 2015

Cannabis: A new frontier in therapeutics


While debate about recreational marijuana use continues, researchers are investigating the effectiveness of cannabis for treating pain, spasticity, and a host of other medical problems. Experts share their perspectives on the therapeutic potential of medical cannabis and explore the emerging science behind it.


Related: Skunk's psychosis link is only half the cannabis story

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February 17 2015

Psychedelic Drug Could Have Promising Future In Treatment Of Asthma


A potent psychedelic drug, DOI, was recently shown to be effective in treating asthma in a mouse model.

The psychedelic drug DOI (2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine) was invented by chemist Alexander Shulgin in the 1980s. Shulgin's story itself is worth looking into. Over the course of his lifetime, in addition to working out an easier method for synthesizing MDMA (ecstasy), Shulgin invented hundreds of new psychedelic drugs, based on the structure of drugs like LSD and mescaline.

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February 17 2015

Meditating might help older people sleep, researchers say


Older people who have sleep problems found more relief from a mindful meditation program than from a conventional sleep education program, researchers reported.

In another study, researchers found that meditation -- at least for people who did it for years -- may slow age-related loss of the brain’s gray matter.

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February 17 2015

Can skeptics ease their pain with acupuncture?


People with back pain who have low expectations of acupuncture before they start a course of treatment will get less relief than those people who believe it will work, a new study shows.

Conversely, people who have a positive view of back pain and who feel in control of their condition experience less back-related disability over the course of acupuncture treatment.

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February 17 2015

Italian cemetery may provide insights to cholera's evolution


Archaeologists and a team of other researchers are hoping that an Italian graveyard will provide clues about the evolution of the bacterium that causes cholera.

Located near the ruins of the abandoned Badia Pozzeveri church in Italy's Tuscany region, the graveyard contains bodies of cholera victims of the world cholera epidemic of the 1850's.

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News desk archive...

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