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September 21 2014

Chin strap makes electricity from chewing


Engineers in Canada have built a chin strap that harnesses energy from chewing and turns it into electricity.

They say the device could one day take the place of batteries in hearing aids, earpieces and other small gadgets.

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September 21 2014

A real tiny page turner: The world’s smallest book is produced for $15,000


Two brothers from Canada have come up with a novel idea - a book so small you need an electron microscope to read it.

Teeny Ted from Turnip Town, currently the world's smallest book, is a reproduction of a 30-page tale that fits on the width of a human hair.

The reproduction, which is printed with pure crystalline silicon, cost a staggering $15,000 (around £9,250) to create.

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September 21 2014

Mystery of strange pattern in ground near Coventry


Mystery surrounds a strange pattern carved into the ground near Coventry.

The spiral shape was spotted on satellite maps by a historian researching the fabled Knights Templar, who founded the tiny hamlet of Temple Balsall, near Balsall Common, 1,000 years ago.

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September 21 2014

Scientists twist radio beams to send data: Transmissions reach speeds of 32 gigibits per second


Researchers twist four radio beams together to achieve high data transmission speeds. The researchers reached data transmission rates of 32 gigabits per second across 2.5 meters of free space in a basement lab. For reference, 32 gigabits per second is fast enough to transmit more than 10 hour-and-a-half-long HD movies in one second and is 30 times faster than LTE wireless.

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September 21 2014

Japanese construction giant Obayashi announces plans to have a space elevator up and running by 2050


Once the realm of science fiction, a Japanese company has announced they will have a space elevator up and running by the year 2050.

If successful it would revolutionise space travel and potentially transform the global economy.

The Japanese construction giant Obayashi says they will build a space elevator that will reach 96,000 kilometres into space.

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September 21 2014

India scents victory in Asian space race to Mars


The 1.3-tonne spacecraft, carrying an unmanned probe, is set to enter a Mars orbit after 10 months in space. It is India’s first mission to the planet and will search for evidence of life.


Related: How to Get to Mars: NASA and India Face Big Tests at Red Planet

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September 20 2014

New Evidence That We Could Grow Vegetables On Mars And The Moon


Could we grow a garden in the soils of Mars and the Moon? A new study digs down deep into the interstellar dirt and says that, yes, the soil up there is capable of supporting plant germination. In fact, it might even be as good as some of the poorer soils here on Earth.


Related:
1- Four Handy Tips for Growing Your Garden on Mars
2- Download, print, build your Martian home in 24 hours

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September 20 2014

Pupil size shows reliability of decisions, before information on decision is presented


The precision with which people make decisions can be predicted by measuring pupil size before they are presented with any information about the decision, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology this week.

The study, conducted by Peter Murphy and colleagues at Leiden University, showed that spontaneous, moment-to-moment fluctuations in pupil size predicted how a selection of participants varied in their successful decision making.

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September 20 2014

Time dilation measured at 40 percent of the speed of light—in the lab


Einstein is most famous for general relativity, which is really a theory of gravity. But his theory of special relativity has been just as important. Special relativity is all about how to interpret measurements: if you measure the speed of an object from a moving vehicle, how do I reconcile that number with a measurement I make from the side of the road? At low speeds this is a fairly simple task, but at very high speeds things start to get strange. This strangeness arises as a consequence of the speed of light being constant.

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September 20 2014

So what is a supermassive black hole anyway?


The discovery of a supermassive black hole inside a tiny dwarf galaxy has shed new light on the potential number of black holes in the universe.

An international team of researchers has discovered a supermassive black hole in M60-UCD1, a dwarf galaxy some 54-million light years away. M60-UCD1 is about 500 times smaller than our own galaxy, the Milky Way, and 1,000 times less massive. The researchers published their findings Wednesday in Nature.

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September 20 2014

Hints of Mysterious Dark Matter Revealed by Cosmic Rays


A particle detector floating 250 miles (400 kilometers) above Earth has analyzed 41 billion cosmic-ray particles, and the data have revealed new insights into the mysterious and invisible dark matter that physicists believe makes up 27 percent of the universe.

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) detector aboard the International Space Station already gathered evidence of dark matter last year, but the new results are the most precise measurements of cosmic-ray particles yet.

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September 20 2014

Nasa will 'miss goal to find 90% of nearby potentially dangerous asteroids'


Nasa will not meet a goal ordered by Congress to find 90% of nearby and potentially dangerous asteroids larger than 460 feet (140 metres) in diameter, the agency's inspector general said on Monday.

The shortfall comes despite a ten-fold increase in Nasa's annual budget over the past five years – from $4m (£2.5m) in 2009 to $40m (£25m) in 2014 – to track and assess potentially dangerous asteroids and comets. So-called "near-earth objects", or NEOs, fly within about 28m miles (45m km) of Earth.

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September 20 2014

UFO believers claim NASA footage of 'tether incident' proves aliens exist


In the world of UFOs, believers are still talking about the well known "tether incident."

The incident happened Feb. 25, 1996, during Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-75, the 75th Space Transportation System mission flown by one of the four space shuttles.


Related:
1- UFO 'Five Miles Wide' Caught Hovering Above The Ocean In NASA Photo
2- ‘UFO’ spotted over the skies of Portsmouth
3- Is There a UFO on Comet 67P?

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September 20 2014

Could This Severed Arm Prove Bigfoot’s Existence?


It is a question so often lamented in relation to the study of mystery beasts: “If they exist, then why do we never find their bodies?”.


Related:
1- Has the Yeti Come to the Moscow Region?
2- Bigfoot’s local devotees have a belief that can’t be shaken
3- Bigfoot: An Inter-Dimensional Entity

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September 20 2014

Colossal Squid Tests Could Reveal 'Kraken' Clues


Scientists have defrosted a colossal squid in a bid to unlock the mysteries around this rarely seen monster of the deep.

The creature is one of the ocean's most elusive species and this specimen is the length of a minibus.

Dr Bolstad said it is possible ancient sightings of the species gave rise to tales of the legendary kraken sea monster.

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September 20 2014

Bird brains more precise than humans'


Birds have been found to display superior judgement of their body width compared to humans, in research to help design autonomous aircraft navigation systems.

A University of Queensland (UQ) study has found that budgerigars can fly between gaps almost as narrow as their outstretched wingspan rather than taking evasive measures such as tucking in their wings.

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September 20 2014

Humans Evolved To Be Fair For Selfish Reasons


New research suggests we're motivated to seek equal rewards — despite the disadvantages to ourselves — to prevent our partners from being unhappy and to avoid any negative outcomes that may follow.

"Make sure you play fairly," often say parents to their kids. In fact, children do not need encouragement to be fair, it is a unique feature of human social life, which emerges in childhood. When given the opportunity to share sweets equally, young children tend to behave selfishly but, by about eight years of age, most prefer to distribute resources to avoid inequalities, at least among members of their own social group.

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