News Desk Archive

Author of the Month

To sign up to the Graham Hancock newsletter mailing list, please click here.

Page:  <<<  prev  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  next  >>>

 

January 18 2015

Could laser light and nanoparticles replace chemotherapy?


Physicists from the University of Copenhagen and doctors from Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, have joined forces to test whether malignant tumours can be removed by using nanoparticles and laser light instead of unpleasant chemotherapy treatment.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 18 2015

Cancer deaths will be eliminated for all under 80 by 2050, new research predicts


Deaths from cancer will be “eliminated” for all age groups except the over-80s by 2050, if recent gains in prevention and treatment carry on apace, experts have said.

Researchers from University College London (UCL) and King’s College London said the UK was at a “special point in history” and could set a bold ambition to eradicate cancer-related mortality in people aged under 80 “during the course of the coming 20 to 30 years”.


Related: Cancer is the 'best death' – so don't waste billions trying to cure it, says leading doctor

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 18 2015

Sedentary behavior trumps fat as a killer


If you had but one New Year's resolution to keep, maybe it should be to get up and move a little more.

New research shows that for men and women across the spectrum of body mass index and belt size, those who got even a little exercise - burning up about 100 calories a day in physical activity - were less likely to die of any cause over a 12-year period than those who were entirely sedentary.


Related: A Bit of Walking Takes Strain Out of Running a Marathon

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 18 2015

Average life expectancy heading for 100


Previously unthinkable longevity milestone looms with average child born within next generation expected to live more than a century.


Alt: Now that's a gran old age! Average life expectancy for girls born in 2057 will be ONE HUNDRED

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Prolonging lifespan: Researchers create 'Methuselah fly' by selecting best cells


A team of researchers at the University of Bern has managed to considerably prolong the lifespan of flies by activating a gene which destroys unhealthy cells. The results could also open new possibilities in human anti aging research.

Immortality has long been a dream for humans. For example, in many ancient mythologies, immortality is one of the traits that distinguishes humans from the gods.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Meteorites are Byproducts, not Building Blocks


According to a team of scientists co-led by Prof Maria Zuber of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Prof Jay Melosh of Purdue University, meteorites are byproducts of planet formation rather than planetary building blocks.

Meteorites have long been regarded as relics of the early Solar System. These objects are studded with chondrules – millimeter-scale, previously molten, glassy spherules.


Alt: Asteroids May Not Be Planet Building Blocks After All

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Three nearly Earth-size planets found orbiting nearby star: One in 'Goldilocks' zone


NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has discovered a star with three planets only slightly larger than Earth. The outermost planet orbits in the 'Goldilocks' zone -- where surface temperatures could be moderate enough for liquid water and perhaps life to exist.


Related: Planets outside our solar system more hospitable to life than thought

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Lost Beagle2 probe found 'intact' on Mars


The missing Mars robot Beagle2 has been found on the surface of the Red Planet, apparently intact.

High-resolution images taken from orbit have identified its landing location, and it looks to be in one piece.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Solar Panels Floating on Water Will Power Japan's Homes


Nowadays, bodies of water aren't necessarily something to build around—they're something to build on. They sport not just landfills and man-made beaches but also, in a nascent global trend, massive solar power plants.

Clean energy companies are turning to lakes, wetlands, ponds, and canals as building grounds for sunlight-slurping photovoltaic panels. So far, floating solar structures have been announced in, among other countries, the United Kingdom, Australia, India, and Italy.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Thorium Power Is the Safer Future of Nuclear Energy


Nuclear power has long been a contentious topic. It generates huge amounts of electricity with zero carbon emissions, and thus is held up as a solution to global energy woes. But it also entails several risks, including weapons development, meltdown, and the hazards of disposing of its waste products.

But those risks and benefits all pertain to a very specific kind of nuclear energy: nuclear fission of uranium or plutonium isotopes.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Researchers find salmon semen can be used to extract rare earth elements from waste


A team of researchers affiliated with several academic/research facilities in Japan has found that dried salmon semen can be used to extract rare earth elements (REEs) from liquid ore waste. In their paper published in the journal PLOS ONE, the team describes how they came up with the idea, the process they used, and the prospects of using their technique in commercial applications.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Sewage sludge could contain millions of dollars worth of gold


If the holy grail of medieval alchemists was turning lead into gold, how much more magical would it be to draw gold from, well, poop? It turns out that a ton of sludge, the goo left behind when treating sewage, could contain several hundred dollars’ worth of metals—potentially enough to generate millions of dollars worth of gold, silver, and other minerals each year for a city of a million people.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Scientists Drill through 2,400 Feet of Antarctic Ice for Climate Clues


Scientists have drilled into one of the most isolated depths in all of the world’s oceans: a hidden shore of Antarctica that sits under 740 meters of ice, hundreds of kilometers in from the sea edge of a major Antarctic ice shelf. Humans have never glimpsed this place; reaching it required seven years of planning and 450 tonnes of fuel and gear. But understanding what is happening down there, so far from human view, will be crucial for predicting the future fate of Antarctica’s ice sheets amid rising temperatures.


Related: 2014 was Earth's warmest year on record, data show

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Tiny plant fossils a window into Earth’s landscape millions of years ago


An international team led by the University of Washington has discovered a way to determine the tree cover and density of trees, shrubs and bushes in locations over time based on clues in the cells of plant fossils preserved in rocks and soil. Tree density directly affects precipitation, erosion, animal behavior and a host of other factors in the natural world. Quantifying vegetation structure throughout time could shed light on how the Earth’s ecosystems changed over millions of years.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Items lost in the Stone Age are found in melting glaciers


Around 7,000 years ago the Earth was enjoying a warm climate. Now glaciers and patches of perennial ice in the high mountains of Southern Norway have started to melt again, revealing ancient layers.

“Actually we should be slowly approaching a new ice age. But in the past 20 years we have witnessed artefacts turning up in summer from increasingly deeper layers of the glaciers,”.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

The Myth and Enduring Mystery of the Carnac Stones


Though its name bears resemblance to Upper Egypt’s ancient ceremonial temple, the commune known as Carnac, located in southern Brittany, France, is associated with the mysteries of the ancients for more than just its name. For here, a neolithic mystery also exists, involving ancient standing stones numbering in excess of 3,000.

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]
January 17 2015

Archaeologists: Remains of bustling city found near new bridge


There’s a lot archaeologists still don’t know about the American Indian culture in our region; For one, East St. Louis was a bustling city chock full of immigrants. Around 1000 A.D., it was bigger than nearby Cahokia Mounds site and it thrived for about 150 years.

“This is the first big city in North America,” said Brad Koldehoff, the chief archaeologist for the state.


Related: Peru's 'second Machu Picchu' is opening up

[View as single article...] [Follow article link...]

Back to News Desk...

Page:  <<<  prev  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  next  >>>

Enjoy the newsdesk? Please tell others about it:

Tweet
Add Graham via his official Twitter, Google+ and facebook pages.

G+. Site design by Amazing Internet Ltd, maintenance by Synchronicity. Site privacy policy. Contact us.

Dedicated Servers and Cloud Servers by Gigenet. Invert Colour Scheme / Default