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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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November 17 2014

Feelings of Disgust May Lead People to Lie, Cheat


While feelings of disgust may lead people to behaviors like lying and cheating, cleanliness can help people return to ethical behavior, according to a recent study.

Researchers at Rice University, Pennsylvania State University and Arizona State University highlight the powerful impact emotions have on individual decision-making in their latest report.

"As an emotion, disgust is designed as a protection".

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November 17 2014

Autism’s Gut-Brain Connection


Stress can send your stomach into a painful tailspin, causing cramps, spasms and grumbling. But trouble in the gut can also affect the brain.

This two-way relationship may be an unlikely key to solving one of medicine's most pressing—and perplexing—mysteries: autism.


Related: Short men more likely to die from dementia, Edinburgh University finds

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November 17 2014

Fish oil shows promise in preventing psychosis


Seven years after the end of a trial in which young people at severe risk of developing psychotic disorders were given fish oil tablets, most remain mentally healthy, a new study has found.

The study, presented today at the International Early Psychosis Conference in Japan, lends weight to the theory that concentrated fish oil, which contains omega-3 fatty acids, may help prevent the development of psychosis.


Related: Mediterranean diet is best way to tackle obesity, say doctors

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November 17 2014

Brain's taste secrets uncovered


The brain has specialist neurons for each of the five taste categories - salty, bitter, sour, sweet and umami - US scientists have discovered.

The study, published in the journal Nature, should settle years of debate on how the brain perceives taste.


Related: Learning How Little We Know About the Brain

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November 17 2014

Females protect offspring by forcing males to compete through sperm instead of violence


Latest research shows the females of some mammal species will have many mates to ensure unclear paternity, so that males can’t resort to killing their rival’s offspring for fear of killing their own. This forces males to evolve to compete through sperm quantity, leading to ever-larger testicles. Scientists find that as testis size increases, infanticide disappears.


Alt: Male Sexual Aggression: What Chimps Can Reveal About People

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November 17 2014

How man’s best friend could hold the key to anti-ageing


Scientists are targeting a new set of recruits to test anti-ageing drugs: pet dogs. And according to their plans, not any old pooch will do. The researchers want to concentrate their trials on large canines.


Related: New natural supplement relieves canine arthritis
Related: Billions Have Been Spent on Technology to Find IEDs, but Dogs Still Do It Better

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November 16 2014

Woolly mammoth cloning war: Scientists divided over ethics of attempting to revive extinct mammal


Will woolly mammoths stride the Siberian plains once again? DNA samples from an exceptionally well preserved extinct Mammuthus, found in the snowy wastes of Siberia, have raised the prospect of cloning.

But scientists are divided about raising the species from the dead, 10,000 years after becoming extinct.

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November 16 2014

'Ancient monster' surfaces in Siberian river


Extinct reptile with 'toothy grin' found by fishermen as they rafted in remote area of the Yamal peninsula.

Is it a mesosaur? Or some other kind of dinosaur? No-one is quite sure yet. Siberian zoologists are rushing to the site to extract the crocodile-like remains before they are covered by ice and washed away in the spring floods next year.


Related: Farmer Claims Skull Found in Chained Box is From a Werewolf

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November 16 2014

Giant Armored Dinosaurs Breathed Through 'Krazy Straw' Airways


Carrying around an exoskeleton of bony armor is hard work. But armored ankylosaurs figured out a way to shoulder the load and stay cool. These Cretaceous dinosaurs had "Krazy Straw" nasal passages that helped them air-condition their brains, according to a new study.

"These heads are just covered with bone — they just look like rocks with eyes. And yet, when you look inside, they have these noses that go all over the place".

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November 16 2014

Latrines, sewers show varied ancient Roman diet


Archaeologists picking through latrines, sewers, cesspits and trash dumps at Pompeii and Herculaneum have found tantalizing clues to an apparently varied diet there before the eruption of Mount Vesuvius destroyed those Roman cities in 79 A.D.

Much of what residents didn't digest or left on their plates went down into latrine holes, became remnants in cesspits built up over the centuries or was thrown away in local dumps.

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November 16 2014

Medieval chess pieces found in Northampton dig


Archaeologists have found two Medieval chess pieces made from antler during the final stages of a dig in Northampton town centre. Archaeologist Jim Brown said the pieces were "clear evidence" of demand for a "leisure product" in middle to late 12th Century Northampton.


Related: 350-Year-Old High Heels, Tea and Goblets Uncovered at Irish Castle

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November 16 2014

Archaeologists Uncover Massive Fortifications in Ancient City of King Midas


A team of archaeologists have unearthed new evidence of massive, monumental defensive works at the Citadel Mound site of ancient Gordion in Turkey. Excavations have also revealed ancient industrial activity dating back to the 11th century BCE.

Located about 70–80 km southwest of Ankara in western Turkey, Gordion, the ancient city best known as the residence of the legendary King Midas.

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November 16 2014

Tell-tales of war: Traditional stories highlight how ancient women survived


Through the ages, women have suffered greatly because of wars. Consequently, to protect themselves and their offspring, our female ancestors may have evolved survival strategies specific to problems posed by warfare, says Michelle Scalise Sugiyama of the University of Oregon in the US.

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November 16 2014

Karkemish archaeologists dig metres away from ISIS-controlled territory


Archaeology and war don't usually mix, yet that's been the case for years at Karkemish, an ancient city along the Turkey-Syria border where an excavation team announced its newest finds Saturday just metres from ISIS-controlled territory.

Karkemish, dating back more than 5,000 years, is close to the Syrian city of Jarablous, which now flies the black banner of the Islamic extremist group.

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November 16 2014

Climate change 'will make lightning strike more'


Global warming will significantly increase the frequency of lightning strikes, according to US research.

The research, published in Science, was carried out with the help of data from a US network of lightning detectors.


Related: Warmest oceans ever recorded

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November 16 2014

Does Our Universe Bear the Scars of a Collision with Another Universe?


Though many physicists believe it's possible that our universe is one of many in a multiverse, they struggle to find concrete evidence to back up that hypothesis. But now, we may find that evidence — if we look for the wreckage left behind by a collision of cosmic proportions.

Over at Quanta, Jennifer Oullette explores one experiment that could provide evidence for the multiverse. It assumes that our universe was born during a collision with another universe — and that this dramatic event may have left a cosmic imprint behind that we can measure.

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November 16 2014

Philae Comet Lander Falls Silent as Batteries Run Out


The first spacecraft ever to land on a comet has fallen silent, entering a potentially long, cold sleep after running out of power.

The European Space Agency's Philae lander completed its last transmission Friday (Nov. 14) at 7:36 p.m. EST (0036 GMT) before settling into a hibernation state as its batteries ran out.


Related: Philae comet lander alien ‘cover-up’ conspiracy theories emerge

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News desk archive...

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