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Daily alternative news articles at the News Desk for GrahamHancock.com. Featuring alternative history, science, archaeology, ancient egypt, paranormal & supernatural, environment, and much more. Check in daily for updates!

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March 22 2015

Two-dad babies could soon be a reality


For the first time, scientists have shown that it’s possible for two people of the same sex to create a baby, without the need for outside egg or sperm donation. The most obvious benefits would be for homosexual couples who want to have a child together, but the method could also help couples who have been affected by infertility.

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March 22 2015

Researchers may have solved origin-of-life conundrum


The origin of life on Earth is a set of paradoxes. In order for life to have gotten started, there must have been a genetic molecule—something like DNA or RNA—capable of passing along blueprints for making proteins, the workhorse molecules of life. But modern cells can’t copy DNA and RNA without the help of proteins themselves. To make matters more vexing, none of these molecules can do their jobs without fatty lipids, which provide the membranes that cells need to hold their contents inside.

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March 22 2015

Life found in ‘deadest’ part of the ocean


Scientists have discovered evidence of oxygen-breathing microbial life more than 200 feet below the ocean floor—or 12,000 feet below sea level in the Pacific Ocean.

The microbes were found all the way through the sediment from the seafloor to the igneous basement at seven sites in the South Pacific gyre, considered the “deadest” place in the ocean.

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March 22 2015

Unusual asteroid suspected of spinning to explosion


A team led by astronomers from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, recently used the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii to observe and measure a rare class of "active asteroids" that spontaneously emit dust and have been confounding scientists for years. The team was able to measure the rotational speed of one of these objects, suggesting the asteroid spun so fast it burst, ejecting dust and newly discovered fragments in a trail behind it.


Related: Rosetta's comet is spinning down

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March 22 2015

Mercury's Odd Surface Features Mapped by NASA Spacecraft


Two new maps of Mercury taken by a NASA probe have identified never-before-seen formations on the planet's surface.

The previously unidentified regions of Mercury have compositions that differ significantly from the crust around them. Known as geochemical terranes, these zones provide insight into the formation of the outer skin of the planet. The maps appear in two new studies, which suggest that the most recently identified features may have formed not from the planet's crust but from just below it, in the mantle.

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March 22 2015

Helicopter Drones on Mars


NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory recently announced that it is developing a small drone helicopter to scout the way for future Mars rovers. Why would Mars rovers need such a robotic guide? The answer is that driving on Mars is really hard.

Here on Earth, robots exploring volcanic rims, or assisting rescuers, can be driven by remote control, with a joystick. This is because radio signals reach the robot from its control center almost instantly.

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March 22 2015

Possible fatty acid detected on Mars


A fatty acid might be among organic molecules discovered on Mars by Nasa's Curiosity rover.

However, it's not possible at this stage to determine whether the compound has a biological or non-biological origin.

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March 21 2015

Humans Butchered Elephants 500,000 Years Ago, Ancient Tool Suggests


Stone tools that are half a million years old have been unearthed in Israel — and they still have traces of elephant fat clinging to them.

The new discovery shows that ancient humans used tools to process and butcher large animals, researchers say.

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March 21 2015

Red Lady cave burial reveals Stone Age secrets


Some 19,000 years ago, a woman was coated in red ochre and buried in a cave in northern Spain. What do her remains say about Paleolithic life in western Europe?

SHE was privileged to have a tombstone, and her grave may have been adorned with flowers. But the many who, for millennia after her death, took shelter in El Mirón cave in northern Spain must have been unaware of the prestigious company they were keeping.

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March 21 2015

An analysis of modern DNA uncovers a rough dating scene after the advent of agriculture.


Once upon a time, 4,000 to 8,000 years after humanity invented agriculture, something very strange happened to human reproduction. Across the globe, for every 17 women who were reproducing, passing on genes that are still around today—only one man did the same.

"It wasn't like there was a mass death of males. They were there, so what were they doing?" asks Melissa Wilson Sayres, a computational biologist at Arizona State University, and a member of a group of scientists who uncovered this moment in prehistory by analyzing modern genes.

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March 21 2015

Earth's climate is starting to change faster, new research shows


Earth is now entering a period of changing climate that will likely be faster than what's occurred naturally over the last thousand years, according to a new article, committing people to live through and adapt to a warming world.

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March 21 2015

Why Spring Gets About 30 Seconds Shorter Every Year


Spring arrives on Friday, and you might want to make the most of it. The season of flowers and showers actually gets shorter every year by about 30 seconds to a minute, due to astronomical quirks, researchers say.

This year, spring officially starts at 6:45 p.m. EDT on March 20, according to the U.S. National Weather Service (NSW). At that exact moment, which is called the vernal equinox, the Earth's axis will reach a halfway mark, where it points neither toward the sun (as it does on the summer solstice) nor away from the sun (as it does on the winter solstice), said Gavin Schmidt, the director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City.

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March 21 2015

Growing nickel from trees


Phytomining is a method for literally ‘farming’ metals by growing hyperaccumulator plants and then harvesting the biomass rich in a particular metal. The potential for phytomining is greatest for nickel because of the occurrence of vast areas of ultramafic soils that are naturally enriched in nickel and occur around the world, and also because there are a number of potentially suitable hyperaccumulator species to be used as ‘metal crops’.


Related: Amazon's trees removed nearly a third less carbon in last decade – study

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March 21 2015

Plants Thrive in Psychedelic, Underground Farms


When it comes to the future of farming, could sun and dirt become a thing of the past?

Scientists at the Dutch firm PlantLab are developing agricultural methods that allow plants to flourish in boxes underground rather than in open fields. The psychedelic hydroponic conditions consume less energy, space and water than conventional methods.


Related: Dew-Collecting Greenhouse Grows Veggies in the Desert

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March 21 2015

Some mushrooms glow, and here's why


Did you know that there are mushrooms that actually glow? Aristotle was aware of this intriguing fact more than 2,000 years ago. He also was the first person to ask a simple question in print: Why? Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 19 finally have a good answer. The light emitted from those fungi attracts the attention of insects, including beetles, flies, wasps, and ants. Those insect visitors are apparently good for the fungi because they spread the fungal spores around.


Related: Human Bodies Glow, Proving That The World Is Weirder Than We Can Imagine

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March 21 2015

Look, your eyes are wired backwards: here’s why


The human eye is optimised to have good colour vision at day and high sensitivity at night. But until recently it seemed as if the cells in the retina were wired the wrong way round, with light travelling through a mass of neurons before it reaches the light-detecting rod and cone cells. New research presented at a meeting of the American Physical Society has uncovered a remarkable vision-enhancing function for this puzzling structure.

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March 21 2015

The myopia boom


Short-sightedness is reaching epidemic proportions. Some scientists think they have found a reason why.

The southern city of Guangzhou has long held the largest eye hospital in China. But about five years ago, it became clear that the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center needed to expand.

More and more children were arriving with the blurry distance vision caused by myopia, and with so many needing eye tests and glasses, the hospital was bursting at the seams.

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News desk archive...

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